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Discussion Starter #1
Been looking at speeding up my reloading and was looking at the Lee progressive press' I have always used Lee products and have absolutely nothing to complain about. Right now I am using the Lee Classic Cast turret and love the thing, but just want something faster. So, what is the difference, pros and cons of the two aforementioned press set-ups. Looking and googling, I can't see which one is better or more convenient. Will be used for 45acp and 357. Any ideas or experience with the two is appreciated.
 

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The biggest difference is the number of stations: The Master has 5 the 1000 has 3. I use all five on my Master as I got the factory crimp dies.

What I like about the master is the ease of changing calibers. It takes me less than two minutes to swap calibers. I load .357, .44, and .45ACP.

Out of the box the Master is not quite right, there are a few mods and tweaks that it needs, nothing major but once you're done with them the reliability difference is amazing.

If you do decide to get one go here and watch all the videos before start assembling it.

http://loadmastervideos.com/

If you are mechanically inclined and don't mind messing around with a brand new press the Master is a great deal for the buck, if not get a Dillon.

I'm very happy with mine.
 

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If you are mechanically inclined and don't mind messing around with a brand new press the Master is a great deal for the buck, if not get a Dillon.
Or, if you're mechanically inclined and can afford a Dillon, get a Dillon! :) I guarantee you I'm a lot more mechanically-inclined than the guy who designed the Loadmaster! :biglaugh:
 

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I guarantee you I'm a lot more mechanically-inclined than the guy who designed the Loadmaster!
You might be, and there might be a better press out there, but not at the cost at which you can buy a Loadmaster. I loaded over 10,000 rounds of 45ACP on mine, and though there were hiccups, and it required a bit of upkeep, it turned out some very consistent ammo at a reasonable rate per hour.


Whelen
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I knew I'd get some anti Lee advice, all fine and dandy, but I have never had a Lee product let me down or not perform to my expectations so I figured they'd continue to get my business until such a thing happens. Seems like one can alleviate many Lee problems by keeping it cleaned, keep the primer tray at least 25% full and make fine adjustments during set-up, is this correct in regards to their progressive presses?
 

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I've had several Pro 1000's and two friends had Loadmaster presses. Both use the same priming system, which performed equally well/poorly.
 

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I bought a Pro 1000 in December, I'm on my second hundred rounds with it. I'm getting closer to trusting it completely. I like it's simplicity, a child can tune and adjust it. I figure if I buy a second press it will be a load master. When I started reloading a year ago with my old RCBS single stage JR2, I had a lot of wrecked rounds and adjustment goof-ups. The wonderful thing about progressive is, You make more wrecked rounds FASTER!!!!!!

John
 

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For cast bullets, use Dillon seat dies

Regardless of which press you buy, choose your dies carefully. The Dillon seat die allows you to disassemble for lube clean-out without losing adjustment. With Lead bullets, invariably the lube will build up and give incrementally deeper seating.

By the same token, the Lee size dies go further down the case, and I like them over the Dillon size dies.

CDD
 

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Go to Youtube and look at the Load Master videos made by Shadow500 and Darwin-T. Everything you want to know about a Load Master and more. I would go with the LM over the Pro 1000 because the Pro 1000 isn't going to give you a great deal more than the CT and it will only hold three dies.
Rusty
 

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i have 2 loadmasters and a pro 1000 the pro 1000 has loaded most of all my ammo to date around 7500 rounds,i only went with a loadmaster so i could factory crimp.and this was only necessary because of the 12lb spring i was running on my 1911.
i liked the way the pro 1000 seated the primers with better "feel"because it was the only thing happening at the time.the loadmaster dosent give me the same feel but i have only loaded around 1500 shells so far.

really the pro 1000 is a great press for the money,the only deciding factor is if you need more than 3 stages.then the loadmaster is what you want

as for the dillon fans i think if you are to inept to get the lee running you really should stick with factory loads.the dillons are overpriced,but maybe blue paint costs more?
pete

ps if i was getting a press tomorrow id research the horndy lock and load
 

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I have a Pro1000 I got off ebay for .45acp...It works great, with Lee dies, and Ive never had any problems. Keep the primer tray full and the primer feed slots clean, and you wont have problems.

Also:keep powder out of the moving parts...haha tends to gum things up a bit!
 

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I looked at both the LM and the Pro1000 several years ago - chose the Pro 1000 since the LM had too many things going on at once - seemed sort of Rube Goldbergish...I have loaded about 40 -50K rounds on my Pro 1000. I started with the Lee turret and now use it only for the factory crimp dies. I load all rounds first on the Pro 1000 then run them thru the turret for factory crimp. I keep one turret loaded with 3 different factory crimp dies. Goes fast but gives you a chance to examine each round after crimping. However, if Lee would come up with a 4 station Pro 1000 I would jump on it.

Regards
Jim
 

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At one time I had three Pro-1000's, each set up for a different caliber. I finally sold them and bought a Dillon RL550B.

My only regret was not doing it sooner:bawling:
 

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you guys are killin' me

While I use (like 22 LEE die sets) and recommend many LEE tools (like their chamfer tool, their primer pocket cleaner, their funnel, their dies, their Loader, their Reloader press -- yes, I actually recommend it), I suggest much greater satisfaction with a Dillon progressive.

Significantly greater (I mean you NEVER hear of anyone saying their Dillon was a giant POS and trading it for a LEE, ay? Ever?)

Currently mounted presses include a broken LEE Reloader (broke on its very first stroke) that I use for mounting a Lyman 'M' flare / powder drop-through die with a Hornady/Pacific powder measure on top.
It sits 7" to the left of my Bonanza Co-Ax.
Across from it sits my Lyman Crusher II.

On my main bench I mounted a Dillon XL650.
Under that bench sits a LEE Challenger, broken during its first session (and been back in its box ever since).

On top of my main bench I've got an unmounted Hornady L-N-L I'm refurbishing for a friend (he got it for free, which was a fair price).

So, if one really wants to produce quality ammo fairly rapidly, I most highly recommend testing the Dillon waters.....
I have friends using the Dillon SDB, the 550, the 650, and the 1050.

I use my Dillon to make 600--1,000 rds per hour; takes longer to inspect and box than to make it.
I only make handgun ammo.

(I even figured out how to make 41 AE on mine LOL).
 

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So far, so good, on the Pro 1000. I've done some tweaks on the primer feed, I'll post my country boy farmer mods to it later. But primers now feed faultless to the end of the tray. Cost, $.20. And, a small mod to the powder dispenser to maintain it's reliability, cost, new SS bead chain 1 foot from ACE HDWE, $.59 and 1 small zip tie.

So, the most trouble I had was learning how to adjust the case feed, (I've now mastered it), and getting the dies adjusted for each caliber. Now once the dies are adjusted on the turret, I'm good to go on a caliber change. I changed from .45 cal to 10mm (after getting dies adjusted the first time) and had good ammo in about 5 minutes. I keep a carrier and turret for each caliber. Total investment, 3 calibers $275. I'm cautious, still checking powder weight every 10 or so, and I managed to knock out 200 rounds of 10mm in an hour. I think with practice, and preloaded trays of primers/cases I can get that up to 500. Not bad for a $275. investment. What I like is a lot of the press parts are hardware store items!!!! Besides, if I had a Dillon I couldn't spend time redesigning stuff, I could become bored reloading. The Lee Pro 1000 I think will work out fine for me, it produces enough to match my consumption, and to top it off, makes some FINE looking reloads!

John
 

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I don't know

I made 8,500 40 S&W rds in one day on my XL650, and it was pretty boring.
Even more boring boxing them.

Why (look down)
 

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I have a Pro1000 I got off ebay for .45acp...It works great, with Lee dies, and Ive never had any problems. Keep the primer tray full and the primer feed slots clean, and you wont have problems.

Also:keep powder out of the moving parts...haha tends to gum things up a bit!
Compressed air is your friend. I just blow mine out about once every 100 rounds or so. I don't prime on the press. I can decap and prime 100 cases in front of the TV in 1/2 an hour.
 
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