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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Article here about the TX power crisis.

Failure to prepare is preparing to fail, and an awful lot of people remain clueless through no fault of anyone else but themselves. The ones who survive the outages are given an opportunity to mend their ways and prepare for the next outage or other disaster. But too many won't. Darwin Award types.

It isn't as if TX has never had debilitating weather issues, and this was totally out of the blue. And yet we see long lines for food handouts or at the grocery stores, which of course all utilize just-in-time stocking strategies for economic reasons. The Great TP Crisis of 2020 is lost on these people. That was a very benign dress rehearsal for a real shortage crisis.

Power outage?
-- Battery LED lanterns, lots of extra batteries for all devices.
-- Ways to stay warm with your own body heat. Space blankets cost about a buck and do surprisingly well. Everyone should have a few of these around, along with plenty of blankets, sleeping bags, winter clothing. Dress in layers. There is zero excuse for people freezing to death unless they live alone and have cognitive issues. Even people who can't afford a generator or make a fire (apartment-dwellers for example) have no excuse for freezing. Except their own stupidity.
-- If possible, have an alternate heat source such as a fireplace or a gas stove.
-- Drinking water of course should always be kept available; say a week's worth for every person in the household. (Water heaters are a readily-available supply of 40 gallons or so. Filter that water with coffee filters, at least; and a tabletop ceramic water filter system etc. should be part of preps anyway.)
-- Food. Buy healthy stuff that you can eat without heating up, or have an alternate way of doing so such as a campfire or grill.

The most important factor is the will to make it through. Suffering can be reduced a lot, and death to near zero. Prevention/preparation always beats cure, yet with every natural disaster we see giant herds of people expecting someone else to save them. None of this is difficult; people just have to do it. That's what is so frustrating.

It's about how to prioritize time and money. Instead of eating expensive and unhealthy junk food--save money, buy healthier food you prepare yourself and spend a couple of bucks on space blankets.

I know I am preaching to the choir here, mostly. And doing a little venting as well. It seems like 3/4 of the population think that if they are watching their favorite Netflix show while stuffing their faces with chips, life is good. What could possibly go wrong?

The Greek storyteller Aesop lived from 620 - 564 BC; one of his stories was about the industrious ant and the lazy grasshopper. So you can see this problem is endemic in human nature.
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
For longer-term situations than a week or two as in TX, we need a ready supply of water, food, and ways to stay warm. That is the basic cave-man minimum requirement.

A rainwater-catchment system to replenish the water supply; or a well with a hand-operated pump, because gas for the generator might not be available forever.
Six months or more of long-term storable food. Canned food for shorter term; most canned food has a shelf life of around a couple of years, and should be rotated. Some things such as honey are good indefinitely.
Ways to stay warm, as previously noted.
Other necessities such as medicines, first aid supplies etc.
Some method of protecting your stuff from two-legged predators.

During a prolonged disaster, there will be a massive die-off of those who didn't prepare. You and your family need to survive that period. Call it a month or two. It will be lawless due to desperation.
 

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I take it Missouri didn't have a power loss on a massive scale. And of course, Texans wouldn't have a clue about survival and preparation. They're just a bunch of idiots. Thank God for the always prepared, always informed, and always judgmental, old men on the 1911 Forum to point out the failings of 29 million proud Texans.
 

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I take it Missouri didn't have a power loss on a massive scale. And of course, Texans wouldn't have a clue about survival and preparation. They're just a bunch of idiots. Thank God for the always prepared, always informed, and always judgmental, old men on the 1911 Forum to point out the failings of 29 million proud Texans.
OP is one of the more gifted ones we have :rolleyes:
 

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In a day and age where things operate reliably 99.9% of the time, not everyone makes the decision to spend lots of time and money planning for the .1%. I don't...and so far I've been just fine.
 

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I take it Missouri didn't have a power loss on a massive scale. And of course, Texans wouldn't have a clue about survival and preparation. They're just a bunch of idiots. Thank God for the always prepared, always informed, and always judgmental, old men on the 1911 Forum to point out the failings of 29 million proud Texans.
OP is one of the more gifted ones we have :rolleyes:
I don't think Tom meant any harm at all. The outcome in Texas would have been the outcome anywhere in the US that is not used to extreme cold. I think Tom was pointing out that we can all find ourselves in a big mess if we're not prepared.

He even pointed out that he knew he was preaching to the choir here. I've never seen Tom post anything negative. As far as I can tell, he always means well and his posts are full of wise points.

He is right. We all need to be prepared for the worst....even things we think may not happen to us.

I know my info shows I haven't been a member long.....but I've read many of Tom's posts. I have been a reader on this site for at least 10 years. I was a member here a long time ago and just didn't have time to contribute. I can't even remember what my user name was then. Tom has been around for a couple of years. He is quite full of good info that he doesn't mind sharing. Give him the benefit of the doubt.
 

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People in general don't prepare long term unless they live that way now. People in the Alaskan bush live like they are on a long term collapse.
 

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In a day and age where things operate reliably 99.9% of the time, not everyone makes the decision to spend lots of time and money planning for the .1%. I don't...and so far I've been just fine.
well sure, you spend what you can afford. no one is saying to go all in. but if you use that .1% logic on prepping, you should probably not be a gun owner either. :)
 

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Add to the above great ideas: Know how to turn off your water from the outside.. If all your preps get ruined by frozen pipes bursting you are in deep poop.

Hold on now.

If you are going to shut off water from outside make sure you open a tap in the house
to relieve pressure or you for sure WILL break pipes.
 

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A note to my northern and midwestern neighbors...

Summers in Texas can go 100 to 125 for months on end.
Our home designed to keep us cool.
Big windows, reflective roofs, heavy duty air conditioners.

It has NEVER snowed in Galveston in recorded history.

There are no snow plows, snow shovels, snow clothing,
salt trucks, snow tires or chains, basements,
antifreeze rated below15, or any experience driving on ice.

A lot of people are in danger today.
It's scary for some, deadly for some.

How about cool it with the one-upping and just be supportive.
 

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A not to my northern and midwestern neighbors...

Summers in Texas can go 100 to 125 for months on end.
Our home designed to keep us cool.
Big windows, reflective roofs, heavy duty air conditioners.

It has NEVER snowed in Galveston in recorded history.

There are no snow plows, snow shovels, snow clothing,
salt trucks, snow tires or chains, basements,
antifreeze rated below15, or any experience driving on ice.

A lot of people are in danger today.
It's scary for some, deadly for some.

How about cool it with the one-upping and just be supportive.
good to hear from @cavelamb !

it's true, just moved from chicago and couldn't believe the lack of salting and trucks. and the driving knowledge is really bad....people don't know the packed snow at intersections is pure ice. All common knowledge in states where this happens every year. Not down here.
 

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Well, as a rural Tx resident who went w/o power and just got water back after a week- I take exception to some of the stuff written but do agree with some. I'm no prepper at all, but as a hunter and fisherman own most of the gear needed to make it a week or so on my own.

The biggest issue we saw, beyond the collapse of electric and water systems was that SO MANY here have generators, heaters and back up systems and 4wd vehicles, the gas stations ran out of gas for generators on day 2&3. Without any salt or sand trucks locally, the fuel trucks couldn't make it in to re-supply. We prepare for what we think may happen in our lifetime. Do you store more than 25 gallons of fuel year round?

This week has been uncomfortable, and highlights the failures of the electric and water infrastructure... and each of us have things that need to be addressed. But to suggest that the people of Tx who had issues in a 500 year event are generally unprepared is about as friendly as it would be for us to mock people after an f4 for a lack of tornado shelters and soft building codes.

We had sustained snow and ice in several places not seen in recorded history. Should the people of Hawaii also have snow shovels just in case? :rolleyes:

When the roles are reversed, I'll do my best to just pray that your hardships are short lived.
 

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A not to my northern and midwestern neighbors...

Summers in Texas can go 100 to 125 for months on end.
Our home designed to keep us cool.
Big windows, reflective roofs, heavy duty air conditioners.

It has NEVER snowed in Galveston in recorded history.

There are no snow plows, snow shovels, snow clothing,
salt trucks, snow tires or chains, basements,
antifreeze rated below15, or any experience driving on ice.

A lot of people are in danger today.
It's scary for some, deadly for some.

How about cool it with the one-upping and just be supportive.
Where's the one upping? I'm trying to find it. Some things are just how you choose to take them....and there is no tone or expression with the written word. Sometimes, it's easy to take things the wrong way. I think everybody sympathizes with the unfortunate situation in Texas. As with anything, there are lessons that can be learned.
 
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What's happening in Texas will be a short term event. It's awful that the Americans there have and are suffering through this. I think the OP's intent was to bring into perspective that conditions in our country, with our infrastructure in particular, are primed for other events, possibly longer term. The point was that we can prepare now as best we can and this is something we can all take as a warning while we pray for the people who are suffering and help them in any way we can.
 

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Many of the Elite Texan's are Investment Gamblers. The Laws of Natural Physics do not gamble or bluff.
The Laws of Natural Physics in respect to electrical power grids is believed to be 20% Renewable Energy.
Texas gambled with their 25% Renewable Energy and lost the bet.
Fusion generated power for the grid is the long term answer and our elected idiots should understand it.
Making Laws that do not work with the Laws of Natural Physics is STUPID!
 

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A note to my northern and midwestern neighbors...

Summers in Texas can go 100 to 125 for months on end.
Our home designed to keep us cool.
Big windows, reflective roofs, heavy duty air conditioners.

It has NEVER snowed in Galveston in recorded history.

There are no snow plows, snow shovels, snow clothing,
salt trucks, snow tires or chains, basements,
antifreeze rated below15, or any experience driving on ice.

A lot of people are in danger today.
It's scary for some, deadly for some.

How about cool it with the one-upping and just be supportive.
I think, if this bit of history is correct, it has snowed a good number of times in recorded history in Galveston, Texas.

A white Christmas in 2004....wow!

 
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