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This article and others that will come out will let people know what is really going on. Abbott tried to ramp up power for the coming storm and the Feds wouldn't let him! Green energy policy trumps lives. They forced him to buy insanely expensive outside power. Abbott should have done a press conference calling them out, and then just overridden their dictates, flipped 'em off, and gone ahead under a declaration of emergency.

The Demsheviks are sealing their own doom in the '22 elections (if they can't steal it again).
Now THAT I can agree with...
 

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I don't think the OP realizes that fireplaces actually suck heat out of the room. Being a little too high on the 'haha I prepped and you didn't haha mountain.' is never a good thing. I have a fireplace, but can't hook up a generator, so apparently I have no excuse for freezing in my "apartment". But then living in the upper midwest, winter is sometimes a 7 month season for us. So somehow I've learned to adapt over all these years.
 

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Believe me when I tell you that hearing how to do things from Yankees is nothing new to a lot of Texans. It most often occurs as OUR milk and honey drips from THEIR chin.

If I had a saw buck for every time I got lined out by hearing about "how we did it up North" I could have simply taken a Cancun vacation.

My granny told me that this is actually the root of one of her favorite expressions, "Bless his heart".

Well, I know in my heart that most are genuinely worried that we don't have the sense to pour pizz out of our own boots. That's why we Texans wait for their guidance.

Hey, nothing personal and believe me, nothing new.

I am running low on advice on how I should be reloading ammo though. It's been at least an hour.

They honestly mean well. It's not their fault that I hear nails on a chalkboard when someone with a northern accent tries to help.
For me, a northern accent comes from north of Interstate 10, not just the Red River.

But hey, thanks anyways.
 

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Hell, I don't have any winter jackets left cause I had to burn em all in the fireplace to stay warm.
 

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I can see people in Texas having food and water supplies on hand to sustain themselves for a couple of weeks like anywhere else. But, who would have ever thought a Texan would need to be prepared for Arctic conditions with no electricity or water??? I know I would have never seen THAT coming. Godspeed to all of the great Americans in the great state of Texas.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
I don't think the OP realizes that fireplaces actually suck heat out of the room. Being a little too high on the 'haha I prepped and you didn't haha mountain.' is never a good thing. I have a fireplace, but can't hook up a generator, so apparently I have no excuse for freezing in my "apartment". But then living in the upper midwest, winter is sometimes a 7 month season for us. So somehow I've learned to adapt over all these years.
Well of course heat goes up the chimney--and also radiates out into the room the fireplace is in. Same with wood stoves. We are not talking 100% efficiency here. But fireplaces have been used for hundreds of years at least--because they work. They keep people warm and provide a way to cook. The net gain is much more heat in the room than before the fire was lit, no matter how much heat is wasted up the chimney.

If fireplaces "sucked heat out of the room", people would have stopped using them about 15 minutes after they were invented. What bizarre nonsense. If fireplaces sucked heat out of the room, they would be called air conditioners.....

Yes. If you have a functioning fireplace, you have no excuse for freezing. Whose fault is it if you didn't lay in a supply of wood? If you didn't maintain your fireplace so that it is functional, whose fault is that? Don't come up with excuses, get it done.

To address your second sentence: I am not one-upping anyone in this thread--as I have already said. (It amazes me that I have to point this out. Twice no less.) You are taking offense where none is given.
 

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Discussion Starter #49
Believe me when I tell you that hearing how to do things from Yankees is nothing new to a lot of Texans. It most often occurs as OUR milk and honey drips from THEIR chin.

If I had a saw buck for every time I got lined out by hearing about "how we did it up North" I could have simply taken a Cancun vacation.

My granny told me that this is actually the root of one of her favorite expressions, "Bless his heart".

Well, I know in my heart that most are genuinely worried that we don't have the sense to pour pizz out of our own boots. That's why we Texans wait for their guidance.

Hey, nothing personal and believe me, nothing new.

I am running low on advice on how I should be reloading ammo though. It's been at least an hour.

They honestly mean well. It's not their fault that I hear nails on a chalkboard when someone with a northern accent tries to help.
For me, a northern accent comes from north of Interstate 10, not just the Red River.

But hey, thanks anyways.
Great, another guy with a chip on his shoulder. This time against non-southerners. Grow the f**k up. We are all Americans.

The long lines of people in TX looking to others for help, whether buying food, gas etc, are proof of people not preparing. I didn't make anything up. And AGAIN, this happens everywhere; TX is just the latest example of this.

The problem started when we went from being 90% rural to 90% urban. We came to rely on all of the city utilities, and grocery stores. Any disruption of these flows became a crisis, because we no longer knew how to cope; and the situation just gets worse with succeeding generations.

I'm getting a bit fed up with the jerks and dumbasses on here. Gonna take a break for awhile. I'm sure some will say good riddance.
 
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Remember how the toilet paper aisles looked back in the day?
That's how the all the stores look right now.

The trucks couldn't run for over a week, and I fear the warehouses
had already been drawn down by the year long lock down.

There is no milk, bread, meat, canned food, water, etc on the shelves.

There was no gasoline at the pumps for nearly two weeks.
That was the first step in recovery - fortunately a simple one.
But gas prices are skyrocketing. As expected.

The damage done in the cities due to frozen water pipes is truly
catastrophic. Damage assessments will eventually run into the
billions of dollars.

That said, there have been no incidents of zombie apocalypse.
People are turning out in the millions to help neighbors, provide
food, water, clothing, blankets, and emotional support.

Those of you predicting the worst in humanity - are just wrong.
Shame on you.

And God Bless Texas!
 

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Remember how the toilet paper aisles looked back in the day?
That's how the all the stores look right now.

The trucks couldn't run for over a week, and I fear the warehouses
had already been drawn down by the year long lock down.

There is no milk, bread, meat, canned food, water, etc on the shelves.

There was no gasoline at the pumps for nearly two weeks.
That was the first step in recovery - fortunately a simple one.
But gas prices are skyrocketing. As expected.

The damage done in the cities due to frozen water pipes is truly
catastrophic. Damage assessments will eventually run into the
billions of dollars.

That said, there have been no incidents of zombie apocalypse.
People are turning out in the millions to help neighbors, provide
food, water, clothing, blankets, and emotional support.

Those of you predicting the worst in humanity - are just wrong.
Shame on you.

And God Bless Texas!
Yes....I've been there. I lost everything in a tornado, along with a lot of other people. Several people nearby lost their lives. You really see the good side of humanity when tragedy strikes. It's very encouraging, especially when the media.....and some people ....only focus on the negative.
 
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With two homes in the most affected Texas areas, I had a front-row experience with the cold weather calamity. I'd rather call it a calamity than a disaster, because it was simply a mass of cold air; not a flood, earthquake, tornado, massive wildfire, etc. Moving masses of cold air are a historical reality, and it's happened before... and it will happen again. A similar mass of cold air (even colder than the current calamity) moved into Texas in December 1982... and it stayed around for longer than the current calamity.

Another reason I'd call this situation a calamity rather than a disaster is that I've spent long time periods of my life in very cold places...Canada, North Dakota, Norway, etc. In these places, zero to 20 degrees Fahrenheit in winter is a normal day, perhaps even a good weather day. The difference is simply a modicum of planning in places where cold weather is the norm rather than the exception.

The most basic survival preparations have been well discussed here, in this subforum. Those discussions combined with my own practical experience were very valuable. I was prepared. I cannot say that the calamity was much fun... it was not. And the damage to the gardens in one of my homes remains to be assessed...more than 400 plants.

But there were not any rocket science "surprises" in any of this; and there shouldn't have been so many reactions along the lines of "this has never occurred before and could not possibly have been predicted". It most certainly has occurred before and future occurrences can also be predicted...only the year/date is uncertain.

Unfortunately for many of those who do not own their own homes, things were much worse. There's only so much space in many apartment units and only so much those residents can do when the entire building suffers major failures...power, insulation, plumbing/flooding, sometimes evacuation orders...and there's no backup plan.

A lot of ill-planning and bad decisions occurred at many Texas power generation units. Instruments froze, pipes froze, wind turbines weren't equipped with heating packages... and thus froze, etc. Even gas wellheads froze in many places, cutting off gas supplies to some gas-fired generation units. Coal-fired generation units, which were present and came to the rescue in the 1982 arctic blast, had been permanently shuttered. All of this could have been prevented. But a short-term focus on the next quarter's profits was what drove the poor decision making among the energy related units that failed.

Perhaps some Federal assistance might be a good thing. But there's no reason for other Americans to pay tons of money to relieve a power generation system and its overseers from willfully ignoring the certainty of an arctic cold front occasionally making its way into the South. Similar observations could be made relative to building codes and water main construction....it wasn't good enough to survive that which was has occurred before and thus is predictable.
 

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There were also progressive politics involved...

An Emergency Order from the Biden administration’s Department of Energy shows Texas energy grid operator
ERCOT was instructed to stay within green energy standards by purchasing energy from outside the state at a
higher cost, throttling power output throughout the state ahead of a catastrophic polar vortex.
Info Wars
 

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With two homes in the most affected Texas areas, I had a front-row experience with the cold weather calamity. I'd rather call it a calamity than a disaster, because it was simply a mass of cold air; not a flood, earthquake, tornado, massive wildfire, etc. Moving masses of cold air are a historical reality, and it's happened before... and it will happen again. A similar mass of cold air (even colder than the current calamity) moved into Texas in December 1982... and it stayed around for longer than the current calamity.

Another reason I'd call this situation a calamity rather than a disaster is that I've spent long time periods of my life in very cold places...Canada, North Dakota, Norway, etc. In these places, zero to 20 degrees Fahrenheit in winter is a normal day, perhaps even a good weather day. The difference is simply a modicum of planning in places where cold weather is the norm rather than the exception.

The most basic survival preparations have been well discussed here, in this subforum. Those discussions combined with my own practical experience were very valuable. I was prepared. I cannot say that the calamity was much fun... it was not. And the damage to the gardens in one of my homes remains to be assessed...more than 400 plants.

But there were not any rocket science "surprises" in any of this; and there shouldn't have been so many reactions along the lines of "this has never occurred before and could not possibly have been predicted". It most certainly has occurred before and future occurrences can also be predicted...only the year/date is uncertain.

Unfortunately for many of those who do not own their own homes, things were much worse. There's only so much space in many apartment units and only so much those residents can do when the entire building suffers major failures...power, insulation, plumbing/flooding, sometimes evacuation orders...and there's no backup plan.

A lot of ill-planning and bad decisions occurred at many Texas power generation units. Instruments froze, pipes froze, wind turbines weren't equipped with heating packages... and thus froze, etc. Even gas wellheads froze in many places, cutting off gas supplies to some gas-fired generation units. Coal-fired generation units, which were present and came to the rescue in the 1982 arctic blast, had been permanently shuttered. All of this could have been prevented. But a short-term focus on the next quarter's profits was what drove the poor decision making among the energy related units that failed.

Perhaps some Federal assistance might be a good thing. But there's no reason for other Americans to pay tons of money to relieve a power generation system and its overseers from willfully ignoring the certainty of an arctic cold front occasionally making its way into the South. Similar observations could be made relative to building codes and water main construction....it wasn't good enough to survive that which was has occurred before and thus is predictable.
Some pretty good observations made here along with those of cavelamb in the subsequent post. My takeaway from it all is that relying on government, state, national or otherwise. To be looking out for your best interests at any given time. And under any given set of circumstances. That this is a fools errand at best. Unfortunately all too many people without the wherewithal to provide for them selves in times of crises are to often led to believe that the government will actually pull through for them. They appear to be very successful at rounding up votes by promoting this myth.
 

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Some good info here. We should all prepare the best that we can and help out our neighbors. You can't count on the government, and usually it just makes things worse by throwing money at bureaucrats. Pray for Texas. Hopefully, this is a once in a lifetime event.
 

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It seems that about everything that could go wrong in Texas did go wrong. At least from the national news. Tough to watch. 1000x worse to live it. I lived through some real nasty unexpected cold snaps in western North Carolina mountains in the early 1980’s. Ate a lot of small game. Roads were finally cleared of ice and snow with bulldozers. Plumbing fittings and pipe were essentially unavailable for 2 months where I lived. Since that time I have never run a hot or cold water pipe in an exterior wall. Valves and drain cocks are cheap for what they do. 60 years ago I watched my father pitch all of the plumbing downhill in a seasonal cottage. Took 10 minutes tops to winterize the place each fall.
 

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found this morning...

A synopsis of what happened - and why...

Also, Governor Abbot, this morning, said that Texans are not responsible for the outrageous bills that were sent out. Film at 11.

Now, as the snow across Texas melts and the lights come back on, answers remain hard to come by.
What’s clear is that no one — neither the power plants that failed to cold-proof their equipment nor the grid operator charged with safeguarding the electric system — was prepared for such an extreme weather event. What happened in those two hours highlights just how vulnerable even the most sophisticated energy systems are to the vagaries of climate change, and how close it all came to crashing down.

The warning signs started well before the cold set in. Nearly a week before the blackouts began, the operator of a wind farm in Texas alerted the grid manager, known as Ercot, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, that ice from the impending storm could force it offline, an early signal that capacity on the system would likely be compromised.

On Thursday, a natural gas trader trying to secure supplies for his company’s power plants for the holiday weekend was surprised to see prices surging.

The reason? There were concerns that gas production in West Texas was at risk of freezing off, which would crimp supplies for power generation.

And Sinn, the owner of Aspire Commodities, noticed from his computer in San Juan that day-ahead power prices on Texas’s grid were climbing, a sign that the market was anticipating scarcity.

By Saturday, a considerable amount of capacity was already offline, some of it for routine maintenance and some of it due to weather. This is because in Texas peak demand is associated with summer heat so many plants do routine maintenance in winter.

Wind was the first to go, as dense fog settled over turbine fleets, freezing on contact. The slow build-up of moisture over several days caused some of the blades to ice over, while connection lines began to droop under the weight of the ice until power production from some wind farms completely ceased.

But because the resource makes up a minor share of Texas’s wintertime power mix, grid operators didn’t view it as a big problem. Then gas generation began declining. That was inconvenient, but not unmanageable. There was still plenty of supply on the system.

On Sunday, the mood in the control room grew tense. As the cold deepened, demand climbed sharply, hitting and then exceeding the state’s all-time winter peak. But the lights stayed on. Magness and his director of system operations, Dan Woodfin, watched the monitors from an adjoining room, satisfied that they had made it through the worst of the crisis.

“We thought maybe we are OK for the rest of the night,” Magness said.
They weren’t.

At 11 p.m., the green dots on the monitor overlooking the control room turned red. Across the state, power plant owners started seeing instruments on their lines freezing and causing their plants to go down. In some cases, well shut-ins in West Texas caused gas supplies to dip, reducing pressure at gas plants and forcing them offline. At that point, virtually all of the generation falling off the grid came from coal or gas plants.
“Contrary to some early hot takes, gas and coal were actually the biggest culprits in the crisis,” said Eric Fell, director of North America gas at Wood MacKenzie.

Back in Taylor, the town northeast of Austin, where Ercot is based, orange and red emergency displays began flashing on the giant flat-screens that lined the operators’ workstations.
“It happened very fast — there were several that went off in a row,” Magness said.
In the span of 30 minutes, 2.6 gigawatts of capacity had disappeared from Texas’s power grid, enough to power half a million homes.

“The key operators realized, this has got to stop. This isn’t allowed to happen,” said Magness.

By that point, the temperature outside had fallen to 5 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 15 Celsius). Across the state, streets were icing over and snowbanks piling up. Demand kept climbing. And plants kept falling offline.

No one in the room had anticipated this. And it was about to get worse.

The generation outages were causing frequency to fall — as much as 0.5 hertz in a half-hour. “Then we started to see lots of generation come off,” Magness said.

To stem the plunge, operators would have to start “shedding load.” All at once, control room staff began calling transmission operators across the state, ordering them to start cutting power to their customers.

“As we shed load and the frequency continued to decline, we ordered another block of load shed and the frequency declined further, and we ordered another block of load shed,” said Woodfin, who slept in his office through the crisis.

Operators removed 10 gigawatts of demand from 1:30 a.m. until 2:30 a.m., essentially cutting power to 2 million homes in one fell swoop.

The utility that services San Antonio, CPS Energy, was one of those that got an order to cut power.
“We excluded anything critical, any circuit that had a hospital or police,” CPS chief executive Paula Gold-Williams said Friday. “We kept the airport up.”

Alton McCarver’s apartment in Austin was one of the homes that lost power. The IT worker woke shivering at 2:30 a.m., an hour after the blackouts began, and tried turning up the thermostat. “Even my dog, he was shaking in the house because he was so cold,” he said.

McCarver wanted to take his wife and 9-year-old daughter to shelter with a friend who still had power, but the steep hills around their home were coated in ice and he didn’t think they could make the drive safely. “You’re hungry, you’re frustrated, you’re definitely cold,” he said. “I was mostly worried about my family.”

The power cuts worked — at least in so far as Ercot managed to keep demand below rapidly falling supply.
But the grid operator shed load so rapidly that some generators and market watchers have wondered whether they exacerbated the problem.

What’s more, frequency continued to fluctuate through the early hours of the morning, potentially causing even more power plants to trip, according to Ercot market participants. The Sandy Creek coal plant near Waco was one them, falling offline at 1:56 a.m. in tandem with the frequency dip, according to data from the plant operator.

Ercot, however, maintains that the frequency stayed above the level at which plants would trip.

And as blackouts spread across the state, power was cut not only to homes and businesses but to the compressor stations that power natural gas pipelines — further cutting off the flow of supplies to power plants.

Power supplies became so scarce that what were supposed to be “rolling” blackouts ended up lasting for days at a time, leaving millions of Texans without lights, heat and, eventually without water. Even the Ercot control center lost water, and had to bring in portable toilets for its staff.

“It’s just catastrophic,” said Tony Clark, a former commissioner with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and a senior adviser at law firm Wilkinson Barker Knauer LLP.

By Friday, when Ercot declared that the emergency had ended, 14.4 million people still lacked reliable access to public water supplies, and the crisis had already cost the state $50 billion in damages, according to Accuweather.

Meanwhile, some generators made a windfall as energy prices soared to $9,000 a megawatt-hour during the crisis. In all, generators have earned more than $44.6 billion in electricity sales alone this year — more than 2018-2020 combined, according to Wood Mackenzie. Those earnings don’t take into account any hedges that may have been in place.

In the wake of the blackouts, the Public Utility Commission of Texas announced an investigation into the factors that led to the disaster.

But at least the lights were coming back on. In the afternoon, shell-shocked people trickled out of their homes to soak up the sun. “It feels crazy standing outside in the 40 degree sunlight,” said Cassie Moore, a 35-year-old writer and educator, who offered up her shower and washing machine to her boss and friends who were still without power or water. “In this same spot a few days ago I was worried that my dogs might freeze to death.”
—With Javier Blas
 

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I’m still waiting for more people and msm to discuss this....... nothing so far
Trump isn't the President, so you get crickets from the msm. Imagine IF Trump were President. Then again, this may not have happened if Trump were President. He would have had the DOE help Texas obtain more energy. He would never have done what the Biden administration did.
 
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WeatherBELL service was putting out info and warnings weeks before.
Joe Bastardi claimed part of problem was breaking through all the impeachment noise in the media to get the warning out.

He said this storm was same as a Cat 5 hurricane as far as damage potential was concerned and should have received the
same public warnings.

Many commodities and future traders use his services.
 
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