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Will the good news is that the current administration is pushing hard for an all electric zero emissions grid. What could possibly go wrong? :rolleyes:
 

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Article here about the TX power crisis.

Failure to prepare is preparing to fail, and an awful lot of people remain clueless through no fault of anyone else but themselves. The ones who survive the outages are given an opportunity to mend their ways and prepare for the next outage or other disaster. But too many won't. Darwin Award types.

It isn't as if TX has never had debilitating weather issues, and this was totally out of the blue. And yet we see long lines for food handouts or at the grocery stores, which of course all utilize just-in-time stocking strategies for economic reasons. The Great TP Crisis of 2020 is lost on these people. That was a very benign dress rehearsal for a real shortage crisis.

Power outage?
-- Battery LED lanterns, lots of extra batteries for all devices.
-- Ways to stay warm with your own body heat. Space blankets cost about a buck and do surprisingly well. Everyone should have a few of these around, along with plenty of blankets, sleeping bags, winter clothing. Dress in layers. There is zero excuse for people freezing to death unless they live alone and have cognitive issues. Even people who can't afford a generator or make a fire (apartment-dwellers for example) have no excuse for freezing. Except their own stupidity.
-- If possible, have an alternate heat source such as a fireplace or a gas stove.
-- Drinking water of course should always be kept available; say a week's worth for every person in the household. (Water heaters are a readily-available supply of 40 gallons or so. Filter that water with coffee filters, at least; and a tabletop ceramic water filter system etc. should be part of preps anyway.)
-- Food. Buy healthy stuff that you can eat without heating up, or have an alternate way of doing so such as a campfire or grill.

The most important factor is the will to make it through. Suffering can be reduced a lot, and death to near zero. Prevention/preparation always beats cure, yet with every natural disaster we see giant herds of people expecting someone else to save them. None of this is difficult; people just have to do it. That's what is so frustrating.

It's about how to prioritize time and money. Instead of eating expensive and unhealthy junk food--save money, buy healthier food you prepare yourself and spend a couple of bucks on space blankets.

I know I am preaching to the choir here, mostly. And doing a little venting as well. It seems like 3/4 of the population think that if they are watching their favorite Netflix show while stuffing their faces with chips, life is good. What could possibly go wrong?

The Greek storyteller Aesop lived from 620 - 564 BC; one of his stories was about the industrious ant and the lazy grasshopper. So you can see this problem is endemic in human nature.
Our problem stems from ERCOT not following through with beefing up the grid, insulating, etc 10 YEARS AGO. Obviously there was no political interest. I didn’t lose power. Neighbor across the street (80’s) lost power. Apparently if your source has certain facilities- like nursing home, hospital, fire station , PD , etc You get power. I have lived here 75 years, except 66-70, and seen iced roads only as far south as Austin ( Dec 71). The 1978 freeze was rough. But this one included neg degrees. ! IMHO there is no reason for Texas to not have sufficient power at hand for the state ( yesh , yeah - transformers blow, power station crash, I mean AVAILABLE to the state. No rolling brown/black outs. We didn’t have ‘rolling’ anything unless you count rolled over like a steam roller. People lost power not just hours- DAYS. Food lost. Pipes frozen and broken. I will be ordering a GENERAC as soon as I can get them out to estimate. This mess was incompetence and lazy.
 
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Right on brother! Some of my family live in Kemp, TX & they called me, a north central living Michigander, about what they could do to get their machinery started & such. They persevered & made do with what they had. Kudos to all in Texas that made their mind up to continue on.


A note to my northern and midwestern neighbors...

Summers in Texas can go 100 to 125 for months on end.
Our home designed to keep us cool.
Big windows, reflective roofs, heavy duty air conditioners.

It has NEVER snowed in Galveston in recorded history.

There are no snow plows, snow shovels, snow clothing,
salt trucks, snow tires or chains, basements,
antifreeze rated below15, or any experience driving on ice.

A lot of people are in danger today.
It's scary for some, deadly for some.

How about cool it with the one-upping and just be supportive.
 

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Well of course heat goes up the chimney--and also radiates out into the room the fireplace is in. Same with wood stoves. We are not talking 100% efficiency here. But fireplaces have been used for hundreds of years at least--because they work. They keep people warm and provide a way to cook. The net gain is much more heat in the room than before the fire was lit, no matter how much heat is wasted up the chimney.

If fireplaces "sucked heat out of the room", people would have stopped using them about 15 minutes after they were invented. What bizarre nonsense. If fireplaces sucked heat out of the room, they would be called air conditioners.....

Yes. If you have a functioning fireplace, you have no excuse for freezing. Whose fault is it if you didn't lay in a supply of wood? If you didn't maintain your fireplace so that it is functional, whose fault is that? Don't come up with excuses, get it done.

To address your second sentence: I am not one-upping anyone in this thread--as I have already said. (It amazes me that I have to point this out. Twice no less.) You are taking offense where none is given.
What the hell? A fireplace and wood burning stove are two entirely different things. We had a wood burning stove in my childhood home, and I currently have a worthless fireplace in my "apartment" or condo or whatever you want to call it. A fireplace does not heat the room it sucks the hot air out of the room by way of the updraft it creates right up the flue and out of the chimney. And the damper must be kept closed at all times the fireplace is not being used. What you just posted is bizarre nonsense. The logical fallacy that if it doesn't work it wouldn't exist is very odd. Or that I need to keep wood around for it.. jeez. I have an insert in it for looks which I never turn on. The only functional purpose it has is decoration or ambience. I've been wanting to knock that wall away and get rid of it for years, for the extra space.
 

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you do know - a massive thinning of the herd would be the best thing possible for the USA, right?
 

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What the hell? A fireplace and wood burning stove are two entirely different things. We had a wood burning stove in my childhood home, and I currently have a worthless fireplace in my "apartment" or condo or whatever you want to call it. A fireplace does not heat the room it sucks the hot air out of the room by way of the updraft it creates right up the flue and out of the chimney. And the damper must be kept closed at all times the fireplace is not being used. What you just posted is bizarre nonsense. The logical fallacy that if it doesn't work it wouldn't exist is very odd. Or that I need to keep wood around for it.. jeez. I have an insert in it for looks which I never turn on. The only functional purpose it has is decoration or ambience. I've been wanting to knock that wall away and get rid of it for years, for the extra space.
"A fireplace does not heat the room"

It's very inefficient, but a fireplace does heat the room. To say it doesn't is bizarre.
 

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Hey folks im acused of being a prepper, I live 5 mi east of 35 in Kyle, I live in my gun shop. And am lucky enough to be close to the hospital. I had water. Lost running water real early. My therm in the shop seemed stuck at 0. F. I'm sorry but when the powers that be don't care enough to hire people from Tx to head their board, then we're all screwed. I was far from prepared. And I had just gotten out of the hospital getting my belly drained for the 3rd time in two months, lost my mind in the middle of the crspstorm from amonia poisom in my head. Any one that wants to home spend a summer down here come on. Just don't stay. I just turned the damn ac on today. Besides the fact that I can't get to the range, I have ,5 guns I've built that haven't been out thru their paces. I'm trying not to be nasty but if I hear the word unpressedented one more time I'm going nna start shooting. I lived in TulsaOk during the ice storm bsime yeas back. And that was 3 weeks of hell, in an apartment, using the stove to stay warm. And a big beaver. And that wasn't nothing compared to what I just went thru. So help me.......
 

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Good timing on this thread. Just had an ice storm here in the Blue ridge mountains. The grid is down. Currently running on PTO generator hooked up to the Kubota. I can run the whole house for a little more than a gallon of Diesel per hour. Here I am up on the net while my artesian well continues to pump out +/- 700 more gallons per day that I actually use.
I have to get down to the sawmill later on though. They just called me to let me know that They have another big pile of shorts that they want to move for cheap. Just the ticket for the Vermont castings stove in the house or the Jotul in the shop. Probably check on the neighbors on the way out.
The steam shower should be getting good and hot about now. We will check back later. View attachment 605096 View attachment 605097 View attachment 605098
Where's the Jotul? We had a #6 years ago.
 

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If not frozen, you can unscrew a sprinkler head then drink from the pipes with a straw. Your toilet tanks have a few gallons too. Water heater, even more.

No offense to my Texas friends, but here's my experience with the DFW area of Texas. My house in Plano suffered from roof-and-skylight-shattering hail, hurricanes (including a back yard & garage flood) , frozen / broken pipes, a cracked slab from months of sun-baked soil, plus a tornado sucked the trees from the yard & tossed them onto the house.

That ONE house accounted for over 80% of my total maintenance budget for SIX rental homes!!!

Screw it. We sold that sucker last year. Meanwhile, my one in Austin has been just fine. At least up until this latest mess. No idea, I can't reach my prop mgr.
You would not want to drink the water straight from a sprinkler system. There's a reason the systems have a backflow protection to them. The lines often get parasites and worms in them. You don't want that making it's way back into the house, and you definitely wouldn't want to drink any water from out of the heads without boiling first.
 
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