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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's been nigh on 25 years since I reloaded any brass that needed the primer pocket crimp removed.

Now I'm in that situation again. My press is a Hornady LnL progressive.

What's the best bang for the buck out there for removing crimps?
 

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Hornady reamer if its a smaller quantity(couple hundred maybe). $10
RCBS Swage tool (only for a single stage press)$30
Dillon Super Swage is top of the line $100
 

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He said 'bang for buck'...

Best bang for the buck?
Your pocketknife.

Next best bang for the buck?
A carbide countersink bit from the hardware store. $4.

Almost as good bang for the buck?
Any champfer tool.

The nextest best bang for the buck?
A used RCBS primer pocket swage with punches for large and small primers.

The nextestest bang for the buck?
Dillon swager. It's an excellent tool, but costs nearly a hundred bucks to do the same thing as the first 3 tools above. It is smooth and easy to use. And it's fairly quick. But Dillon really gets ya on accessories, and the Super Swage is certainly a money maker. For Dillon, that is. But it truly is a well-made tool, so give it serious consideration if you have the money.

Everyone else makes a good tool (swager or reamer) and they are all worth considering, but also quite costly. They surely get ya on the extras.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
As it turns out I'm also going to need a case trimmer.

I prefer to swage the primer pockets rather than removing brass from them.
 

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The Dillon tool is fast and easy if you have a lot to do. I use the LE Wilson case trimmer. Pretty inexpensive, and does a great job. LE Wilson tools are well made.
 

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Hornady reamer if its a smaller quantity(couple hundred maybe). $10
RCBS Swage tool (only for a single stage press)$30
Dillon Super Swage is top of the line $100
I am currently doing .223 brass for my Colt AR and I can tell you that doing 1000 pieces by hand is enough to hint at what carpel (sp?) tunnel must feel like :barf: Can someone explain the RCBS swage tool. Obviously, it is mounted in the press but will it work for a turret model like my Lee Classic Cast? I really need something else to do this and the price seems right.

Photos anyone?

Thanks
 

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Trim tool

I use a Lee had trim tool for my AR rifle brass. I only trim about 50 at a time while watching TV. I use my D550 for reloading, and still get minute of angle 5 shot groups at 100yds. That's good enough for my needs.
 

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RCBS swaging tool will work on a Lee turret press. Grumpa, pictures don't really show you how it works. See if you can find a video online, or someone locally to show you.

As herd48 says, LE Wilson tools ar very well made. A little expensive, but last a lifetime and you can't go wrong if you can afford it.

Lee's little setup with the case length gauge and cutter works surprisingly well, it's cheap and easy. If it ever gets dull, the cutter is very inexpensive to replace. However, it only cuts to one predetermined length. No problem there, unless you have a weird chamber that requires a certain non-standard trim-to dimension.

If you're doing a thousand cases and you have a drill press (even a small one) look into a carbide countersink bit. I can do thousands with no sweat. It's the best favor I ever did myself to handle crimped primer pockets.

Note on reamed vs. swaged primer pockets:
  • A swaged pocket looks just like a crimped pocket. You cannot tell visually if the crimp has been removed. Unless you mark the case somehow, you won't know whether to swage the next time you tumble and prep. Also, some pockets are crimped so tight that even a swaging tool leaves them too tight.
  • If you're not careful, you can ream a pocket too deeply. The primer will blow out if it's not supported on the side. But if reamed lightly, you can always identify a reamed primer pocket by eye inspection. So you never have to prep that pocket again.
The choice of tool is yours. There is no right or wrong, regardless of what we Internet Forum jockeys tell you. It's always your choice.
 
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