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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings all, I have a friend that is considering selling his Colt Cobra .38 spec, and I don't know enough about it yet. It has an unshrouded ejector, it says Cobra .38 spec CT6 on the left side of the barrel. It has a small "L" also on the left side on the frame behind the trigger. It is obviously a used gun, with little wear and I suspect very few rounds put through it. The Colt logo on the left side is incompletely stamped.:bawling: :grumble: The bluing is in pretty good shape, no wear marks seen... but not that deep shiny blue that I expect from Colt.
Questions:
1. What is a fair price to offer him for it?
2. How much does the incomplete horsey affect value?
3. Would this make an acceptable pocket-holster gun?

It seems to function well, I was able only to put 5 rounds through it yesterday, shooting at one of those 5 liter beer kegs out in the country. My friend claims I hit the can all five times, but I only found one hole through it...:scratch: Is it possible that .38 would deflect from this?

thank you in advance for your answers and opinions,
Mongo
 

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In order:

1. Value depends entirely on actual condition, and where you are.
Some areas, Colt Cobra's sell for more or less than other areas.

A good range would be: An older Cobra in 80%--$250 to $275.

In 95%--$325 to $350.
Prices where you are may vary higher or lower.

2. The incomplete pony has no real effect on a shooter gun. It might effect an unfired 100% new in the box gun.
The Cobra has an aluminum frame that's anodized.
The steel parts are blued, so the aluminum and steel parts have a slight color difference.
The aluminum seldom has the same bright blue color as steel guns.

3. The Cobra is one of the all-time great carry revolvers.
The only down side is, these older versions aren't rated for +P ammo.
True, a lot of people then and now, shoot standard .38 Special for practice, and load +P for "business".

Trust me, the .38 Special doesn't bounce off cans without leaving a nice impact dent.

Sorry to tell you, but you flat missed.
This is easy with short barreled revolvers. You really have to pay attention to the fundamentals when shooting snubby guns.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you dfariswheel for your reply. I do have a few more questions... I have since found out that this model is not rated for +p ammo, yet I've also seen the phrase "practice with regular ammo, and carry +p for 'business' use". So, just how bad is shooting +p out of this model? It is a lightweight frame, will even a few rounds of +p damage it? and if so, how does the frame get damaged? It looks like I will be picking this gun up next spring when I get back to go turkey hunting with it's current owner. I look forward to becoming proficient with a .38 snubby.
 

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Since the factory did NOT recommend shooting +P ammo through the older pre-1972 models, you're on your own shooting +P ammo in any amount.

Shooting over-pressure ammo in ANY revolver not specifically designed for it, can cause the frame to stretch, the ejector to impact the breech face with such force that it causes impact marks, the cylinder can develop end shake, and in general the gun to get battered and loose.

This is "unlikely" to happen when shooting a few +P loads occasionally, but again, you're on your own.

Many people figured that if they actually had to use the revolver in a real "situation", the LEAST of their worries would be causing accelerated wear to their gun.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
In doing my research on this gun, I found an interesting tidbit... this is the model gun used by Jack Ruby to kill Lee Harvey Oswald! (not sure how to substantiate this though) I will end up picking up this gun, probably spring of '06 for a pretty good deal. I am not going to get hung up on whether or not I can shoot +p through it. I figure regular 'ol .38 hollowpoints ought to do the job if I can become proficient with shot placement.;) I found a pic of one that looks like the one I'm going to get, except the pictured one has a heck of alot of holster wear showing.
 

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Standard .38 loads ok

A comment on +P loads, you do not need them. Depending on your carry situation, I would go with 125 Gr. hollow points designed to burn all the powder in a 2" barrel or the old FBI load, 158 Gr. Lead Semi-wadcutter, H.P. or Flat. Hollow points can fill up and not open if they pick up a lot of heavy winter clothing and shooting through and hitting a second person will be the biggest factors to consider. If carry for critter protection, no question, go with the 158 Gr. Lead SWC Flat Point. My 2¢ worth.
 

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Cobra load

when I carried mine,I used a lead 148 gr hollow base wadcutter,loaded reversed over a moderatel load of a fast burning powder. I could keep this load in the10 ring at about 30 -40 ft. It is not a bad carry gun ! Good luck
 
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