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Discussion Starter #1
I've been a Springfield Armory guy for a long time. Have two and love them both. What's making me consider a Para is the LDA. I hadn't paid it much attention but then saw one and dry fired it. That trigger is just amazing. It seemed butter smooth with no creep or stack. Just plain amazing.

So I have a few questions. First, there is a lot of controversy over cast vs forged frames etc and MIM vs cast or forged parts etc. What type of material does Para use? I am not afraid of cast parts etc, and for me the jury is still out on MIM, I'd just like to know what they use.

The gun that got me looking at a para was one of the CCW models - commander length barrel with officer's frame. I also saw a Tac-Four which appears to be a hi-cap commader sized pistol. For anyone who has both, what have your experiences been with hi-cap vs single stack models? Any differences in reliability, handling, performance? Never had a hi-cap 1911 and dont know what to expect.

Also, how hard is it to conceal the high cap models? Are they any thicker than say a glock 30?

Thanks,
Brian
 

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I can answer some questions...

what have your experiences been with hi-cap vs single stack models? Any differences in reliability, handling, performance? Never had a hi-cap 1911 and dont know what to expect. Also, how hard is it to conceal the high cap models? Are they any thicker than say a glock 30?
I have had pretty good luck with my Para's. The reliability is about the same for the full cap vs. single stack. As with any 1911, run at least 500 rounds through it to break it in. Besides, I like to get 500 rounds to know the gun anyway. If you will use this for CCW, run the ammo you will shoot to make sure it's reliable. Yeah, that gets expensive with Corbon. I reload, and carry reloads.

Handling will be different for each. I have smaller than average hands, and the single stacks to "fit" me better, but I have way more double stacks anyway. I can control the single stacks better - but launching 15 rounds downrange sure it fun!

I had trouble concealing my 12.45 LDA in a holster on my waist, so I bought the Para Carry instead. With my love handles the thick grip stuck out too much. I suppose it'd have been cheaper to just lose the weight :p As a matter of fact I've been carrying the Para Carry all the time for the past 2 weeks and no one, not even family members have noticed it on me. I don't think the double stack Para's are thicker than Glocks - but a Glock expert can set me straight. I shot a friends Glock compact .40 (don't remember the model) and would definitely stick with the steel guns like Para. That Glock bucked like crazy.

One last thing: I'd consider one of the "carry" models with the bobbed grip safety and bobbed thumb safety like the Tac-Four, Para Carry, Para CCW, or the many others. I find them much more comfortable to carry and conceal. My 12.45 has a regular beavertail and I cannot conceal that very well, but it works fine in the summer for fanny pack carry.

Well, that should answer some of your questions.:)
 

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jedibrain said:
So I have a few questions. First, there is a lot of controversy over cast vs forged frames etc and MIM vs cast or forged parts etc. What type of material does Para use? I am not afraid of cast parts etc, and for me the jury is still out on MIM, I'd just like to know what they use.
Last time I checked, the LDA guns ahd MIM for their hammers and triggers and the extractors are cast. I think the safety levers and slide stops are MIM, but am not 100% sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
BERGER said:
Uh, Springfield Armory uses MIM parts too.
Agreed, they do. Like I said, not afraid of them, just wanted to know what is in there.

Thanks for the replies too...very helpful.

Here is another question: How hard is it to detail strip an LDA? I can do a regular 1911 no sweat, but I'm sure this is more complicated. What this is leading me to is the next question: How hard would it be to covert an LDA model into one of the 'carry' models with the bobbed hammer and GS? I ask because I have seen a used LDA or two around in the past, and if its doable I may elect to go that route and replace the necessary parts to get to a 'carry' configuration.

Thanks again,

Brian
 

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I've heard horror stories about detail stripping the receiver on an LDA and tiny springs flying everywhere never to be seen again. I have never tried it on mine. I know it is harder to do than a standard 1911.
 

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. . . Also, how hard is it to conceal the high cap models? Are they any thicker than say a glock 30?

Thanks,
Brian
FWIW. . .I have owned both a Glock 30, and a Glock 29. Their external dimensions are the same. I now own and carry a P12.45 which I find is easier to conceal than either. Both the grip and the slide areas appear to be a little thinner than the Glocks. The grips especially, my Glocks were both gen 3 (with the finger grips), and the grips flared at the base somewhat. The grips were also shorter, and didn't fill my hand without using the Pearce grip extensions.

Kevin
 

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I carry a P14 concealed, spring, summer, fall and winter. You can if you're committed.
 

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jedibrain said:
Here is another question: How hard is it to detail strip an LDA? I can do a regular 1911 no sweat, but I'm sure this is more complicated.
The slide strips the same as a Colt Series 80. Don't even try to strip the frame.

My 7.45 LDA has digested around 4,500 in the last 9 months -- mostly full power 230 grain fmj. It does show a bit of wear, but it's nothing excessive. It doesn't show any signs of wearing out soon. The "weak" MIM parts seem to be working just fine so far. So are the "stamped out of a beer can" cams and levers in the frame. They may not look overly robust, but they work just fine.
 
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