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Discussion Starter #1
I'd like to hear comments from more experienced 1911 users on the subject of loose ejectors. I have 2 different guns with loose ejectors now, a Kimber and and Auto Ord. Both of the ejectors are "standing up" on the rear leg, even tho the front is still held down by the crosspin. There doesn't seem to be any interference or marking from the hammer or the slide on the ejectors. Fitted too loose at the factory?
Thanks!
-Sparks
 

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The only problem that I've had with a loose ejector was caused by the magazine hitting it. The ejector extends forward over the magwell, and some magazines were hitting it, either as they were locked in place, or as the gun was fired. Check to see if the upward travel of your mags is stopped by the floorplate contacting the frame, or the top of the mag contacting the ejector.
 

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Are they actually loose?? Or just standing up?? Have you tried knocking them back down with a teflon or rawhide hammer? There should be enough interference between the rear post and the drilled hole to hold it in place once it is seated.

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Originally posted by Newton:
Are they actually loose?? Or just standing up?? Have you tried knocking them back down with a teflon or rawhide hammer? There should be enough interference between the rear post and the drilled hole to hold it in place once it is seated.

Plus a drop of lock-tite on the post wouldn't hurt!
 

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Yeah...That's true. Locktite never hurt anything.....

PS: Shane...Email sent.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The ejectors are standing tall on the rear pin and they are loose. If the magazines were hitting, then it seems like the front
would bend or break off, but this rear leg has got me puzzled. Yes, if I smack it with a soft hammer, it goes down, but it is still loose and comes back up. I guess that means that the front leg is either bent or cracked. I'll report the rest when I put the new parts in.
-Sparks
 

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Sounds like you may need to replace the ejector. You need to be carefull because the front post CAN and WILL break off. That will complicate a replacement. Let us know how it works out, and if you need any details on how to remove the old one and install the new one, let us know.

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Newton,

I would like to see how to replace the ejector. Can you post the method?
 

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It may be that the holes are a bit on the big size and the ejector has not been tensioned.

If the ejector isn't broken/damaged when you get it out of the frame, bend the front leg forward or backward slightly until the ejector fits snugly in the frame, then replace your pin. I prefer to bend mine forward.

You can bend the leg several ways by bracing some portion of the leg/ejector against a vise and hitting it with a brass or hard plastic mallet. Use small-medium taps - DONT smash it.
 

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The ejector is held in place by the slide while the gun is assembled. By pinning the ejector in place simply assures that it won't be lost during disassembly. It serves no functional use and the weapon will fire and function without it being pinned in place.

7th

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Originally posted by 7th Fleet:
The ejector is held in place by the slide while the gun is assembled. By pinning the ejector in place simply assures that it won't be lost during disassembly. It serves no functional use and the weapon will fire and function without it being pinned in place.

7th

7th, I'm not sure I agree with this! The pin (if installed correctly) actually will "pull" the ejector down onto the frame. The leg of the ejector will need to be notched slightly to allow the pin to go past it, and by placing that notch slightly higher than the bore line of the pin hole, the pin will force the ejector down when the pin is pushed into place. The slide does not hold the ejector in place at all. In fact, you don't even want the slide to touch the ejector for reliability issues (and keeping your ejector from breaking!!!).

Lock your slide back and take a look at the ejector. This is how your slide is positioned when the empty brass hits the ejector. If it wasn't pinned (or at the very least force fitted and lock-tited), what would prevent the ejector from flying out the ejection port along with the spent brass?



[This message has been edited by shane45-1911 (edited 06-14-2001).]
 

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Shane pretty much has it down pat. The only thing that varies slightly from what he said is that the ejector is installed in the frame forcibly. Pressed or hammer punched that is. Then where the pin hole is already in the frame, a small drill is used to put the "notch" in the front post using the pin hole as a guide. Then the pin is installed using a hand press. The rear post/drilled hole is where there is supposed to be enough interference to hold the rear portion down on the frame. The front post/drilled hole doesn't need interference due to the notch/pin combination. As for the removal part, one needs to have a very small punch to punch out the pin. Then carefully grasp the ejector in a vise with enough force applied to withstand a hammer hit, dust cover up oriented. Using a rawhide or lead filled plastic hammer, strike the frame rails just in front of the ejector while supporting the frame with a good grip to prevent the frame from flipping and falling. One or two smacks, and the frame will be in your hand with the ejector still in the vise.

Edited to fix a spelling error


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[This message has been edited by Newton (edited 06-14-2001).]
 

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Slide does not and isn't intended to hold the ejector in the frame. Ejector should be held in frame by friction with the pin as security. Yes, the gun will generally function without the pin but obviously wasn't intended to be used this way...kinda like your car will drive with a flat tire but should you really do it?

Also, I don't recommend drilling the notch using the pin hole as a guide - especially with a hand held drill (actually, just don't do it). The rounded ejector post will cause the drill bit to flex and enlarge the pin hole and possibly break the drill bit.

The post should be marked with the ejector in the frame. The ejector should be removed and the notch filed into the post. The pin should install with some friction but should not be hammered in with great force.

Also, you shouldn't have to hit the frame with a hammer to get the ejector out. It will wiggle out of most frames if the ejector is secured in the vise properly.

As always, if you are going to work on your gun, consult Kuhnhausen or some of the other reputable books/manuals or get some training as there is a lot of bad advice in circulation on the net.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The award goes to Rick, who mentioned magazine interference. After pulling the ejector in the Kimber out, I see there is battering just at the lower edge of the face, (from the magazine). In other words, it was incorrectly fit at Kimber. The legs are not bent, but they slide easily into the holes in the frame. I ordered a couple new ones from Brownells, which I hope are oversize and a bit tighter fit in the legs.
A comment about the slide holding the ejector in: you better hope so if that's all there is! If someone wants to try it, pull the pin on a sloppy-fit ejector and see how many rounds it takes to jam up! Not me, thank you.
-Sparks
 

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Originally posted by Sparks:
A comment about the slide holding the ejector in: you better hope so if that's all there is! If someone wants to try it, pull the pin on a sloppy-fit ejector and see how many rounds it takes to jam up! Not me, thank you.
-Sparks
I'm not sure I understand this comment. Again, the slide does NOT hold the ejector in place. It is friction-fitted into the frame, with a pin securing it for extra safety. THE SLIDE DOES NOT TOUCH THE EJECTOR.
 
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