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Hello All Around,

Just purchased a Remington 11-87 police semi-auto gas operated shotgun and ready to take it to the range for the first time. Took it out of the box and inspected it for damage and cleaned off excess lint and cardboard shavings from all moving parts and tested the action. Seems ready to go now. Question: I am told by some folks to apply a bit of oil to all moving parts before shooting the gun and others say not to apply any lubrication at all - it just fouls up the system.

What is correct now? Apply lube or not ?

And anything else I should observe before test firing the 11-87P the first time?

Many thanks!
 

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Light lube works best. No lube will not.

The outside of the mag tube and gas piston/action sleeve get a very light coat lest they do make a sludge.

The other action parts like the bolt only need a light coat, but going heavy won't hurt, it'll just be messy. I like to use grease on the locking block.

ETA:
The gun will develop some heavy wear patterns fairly quickly. That's normal. Watch the rails in the receiver as they can get razor sharp. It's best to lube the contact points and just wipe down the other areas with a lightly oiled rag.
 

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Watch the rails in the receiver as they can get razor sharp.
This is no joke, be careful when cleaning inside the receiver, if you aren't careful you'll be oiling it with blood from a finger you didn't even know was cut. If you do wipe down in there, and you will periodically want to do so, I just take it down and use a thick wad of paper towels with my chosen cleaner to get it cleaned up and lightly lubed (typically just break free CLP).

Light lube will work fine, just like Rick stated.
 

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Take it apart and thoroughly clean & lubricate it prior to first use. Better a little too wet with oil than too little oil for break-in. Try to clean it after each use for the first several outings.
After you get 5-10 boxes through it, you should be able to be more sparing and targeted about oil application. Enjoy the new shotgun!
 

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Like most gun makers, Remington ships their guns with a sticky coat of a preservative to prevent rust during shipping and storage.
This coating is not intended to be on the gun during use.
Unless removed this will gum up the gun and cause problems.

Read the owner's manual. It specifically states that the gun needs to be cleaned before use.
That's to remove the factory preservative.

There are a number of ways to do this, one that Remington recommends for their Police guns is to field strip the gun per the manual and spray it dripping wet with something like Rem-Oil or CLP Breakfree.
Allow to soak 20 minutes for the lubricant to dissolve and flush off the factory coating and to coat the parts with a "using" lubricant.
Wipe off the excess and reassemble the gun.

Also, use a cleaning rod and patches with some bore solvent to clean the bore and chamber.
If you have screw-in chokes, remove it and clean and lube the choke and the threads in the barrel.

Doing this will not only remove the gummy factory lube and apply a using lube, it will also allow you to become familiar with the workings of the gun, to look for any possible factory defects, and to remove any debris left in by the factory or from shipping.
It's not uncommon to find sawdust, metal shavings, or Styrofoam or cardboard left inside.
 

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Light lube works best. No lube will not.

The outside of the mag tube and gas piston/action sleeve get a very light coat lest they do make a sludge.

The other action parts like the bolt only need a light coat, but going heavy won't hurt, it'll just be messy. I like to use grease on the locking block.

ETA:
The gun will develop some heavy wear patterns fairly quickly. That's normal. Watch the rails in the receiver as they can get razor sharp. It's best to lube the contact points and just wipe down the other areas with a lightly oiled rag.
Exactly Right. Anytime you have metal on metal you want lubrication. You don't have to get crazy, just a light coat of oil. You also don't have to get anything special plain old gun oil will do just fine.
 

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The Parkerized 11-87? I've had one of those for 20 years - it was a real police issue that was surplussed out. They put black fore end and pistol grip stock on it with an extended mag, so I just left it as-is. I've shot it a few times and it's a nice semi-auto.

 
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