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Discussion Starter #1
I picked up a NIB SA Loaded Champion last week. I did my normal cleaning and lubrication before I tried to fire it. The trigger was very heavy feeling when I dry fired (with a snap cap). When I did get to fire it I couldn't hit my 4" spinner target at about 15 yards. I coudln't tell if it ws the sights or the heavy trigger causing me to be erratic with my firing. I decided that this pistol was not for me. The next day my wife spoke with one of the distributors we buy guns from, who asked her if I lubricated the main spring. I normally don't go through the process of taking the MSH off to have access to oil the main spring. LAst night I took the time to remove the MSH and oiled the plunger that rests on top of the main spring. After assembling the pistol the trigger was noteceably lighter. So I went a little farther and put some oil on the sear and hammer connection. Once again it felt noticeably smoother. I use TW25-B grease on the rails and at the barrel bushing, and I use BreakFree CLP on the other metal to metal contact areas. I usually have a fairly "wet" pistol at least until I have 400 or more rounds through it. Admittedly I know just enough about pistols and 1911's in particular to be very dangerous. Is there any other routine maintenance or lubrication that I should be doing?
 

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Interesting.

My Champion (though the accuracy pleases me) has a bit of a heavy trigger pull as well. I'll try doing some extra lubrication in there, I've detail stripped it but didn't bother oiling as it looked OK to me. I don't usually make a habit of oiling the MS.
 

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I put a thick, nasty teflon/moly engine assembly lube on my mainsprings. Not sparingly, either. Since it doesn't get much dirt or gunk on it, it stays in good shape over a long period of time, and is very slick. I use grease mostly on the internals of the gun, as those areas are not readily accessible without stripping the gun, and I don't want to have to worry about lack of lube. I recently detail-stripped a gun that I haven't had apart in two or three years, and the grease (Wilson Ultimalube) on the hammer, sear, disconnector, and trigger bow was still there, doing the job. I use oil on areas that I can access with field stripping, or with no disassembly at all (rails, bushing, barrel lugs, hammer strut).
 

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I have a related question from a fellow 1911 newbie...

I prefer to dunk my guns in Simple Green and water (aside from the barrel). To me, it gets things perfectly clean. I do this with all my semiautos, and using an air compressor to dry I have had zero issues.

With my TRP, I can remove the firing pin and extractor, and still dunk the gun. However, I am hesistant to dunk the frame, with the MSH sealed off and likely to retain water and therefore rust. Does anyone remove the MSH every time they clean the gun? If not, how are the rest of you obsessive-compulsive gun cleaners taking care of your frame?
 

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I clean the frame internals only when I have the gun detail-stripped for replacement of a part, spring, whatever. The internals probably don't "need" cleaning any more often than 1000-2000 rounds. I certainly wouldn't dunk an assembled, or even field-stripped, 1911 in a busket of water.
 

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i dont lube the sear and hammer contacts at all execept on the sides of them. i leave the engagement points bone dry. as far as lubing the mainspring housing i just put a dab of wilson grease on top of the cap where the hammer strut touches.
as far as the heavy trigger goes i would just replace the ils, guts and all and replace it. drop a 18lbs hammer spring and tune the sear spring for a nice clean trigger pull. but if you plan on using it as a carry gun i would just leave it alone and shoot/dry fire the piss out of it.
i wouldnt dunk my gun in a bucket to clean it, especially when its still together, but thats my own opinion. i detail clean it every couple of months only because i shoot a lot in a month and keeping on top of cleaning is a pain in the butt and im lazy.
 

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I use nothing but moly for lubing all my guns rifles, pistols and revolvers. Just a little on the frame rails on my 1911, also on the bottom on the slide too where the trigger hits, on the full length guide rod & recoil spring too if you have one and on the barrel bushing too. Also in semi-auto rifles in the gas system too on the pistons besides on the bolt/bolt carriers. On trigger sears it can reduce the trigger pull by up to 50% right away and more as it works in. I see a lot of used semi-auto rifles and pistols and i see so many dry worn recoil springs I ask myself why when just a little moly would solve that.

Moly reduces all wear, all friction and prevents galling. It works into the small pores of the metal so there is no metal to metal contact its actually moly against moly thus "No Wear" and "No Friction" at all. The gun will cycle faster and smoother. My 1911a1 with its #18 spring and with using moly has a very fast cycle time. It stays wet and were you put it too even over long term storage its ready to rock n roll at anytime. Moly also fights corrosion too and it doesn't attract dirt. Like what more can you ask a lube to do?

Its a crime that i see so many used 1911/1911a1's with excessive wear on the front part of the frame rails because of an improper lube was used. Its a shame these guns have to have this much wear when it could of been avoided if they only used moly in the first place. You can use what lube you want to but i never pay for the same gun twice I'll never have to replace mine and i hammer them too as long as you use the right lube "moly" you will never hurt them or see any kind of wear at all. Moly my guns never leave home without it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I've heard of "moly" but I don't know who sells it, nor what form it comes in. Can you tell me what brands are available?
 

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ltcdwb said:
I've heard of "moly" but I don't know who sells it, nor what form it comes in. Can you tell me what brands are available?
I get mine from www.mcmastercarr.com they are an industrial supply company. Just do a search for moly anti-seize then halfway down the page is moly "premium" anti-seize they will send you TS-70 paste. The premium blend has more of a % of moly in it. Any industrial supply company should have it. Or go to www.tsmoly.com i use the TS 70 paste. Just a little will do. If yoy take your 1911/1911a1 apart and with the empty slide on the frame rails with moly work it in back and forth to burnish it in. Once it loosens up(the drag is gone) its ready to assemble the barrel and barrel bushing just put a little on the barrel/bushing too. I put a little on the bottom of the slide too so the hammer face gets some too. If you want to do the trigger sear with moly you can do so too. Assemble the gun and add a little more to the frame rails if it needs it but not too much. I like to run the slide by hand to work it in more after its assembled too. Then wipe off the excess on the outside. Now its ready to test fire and work that moly in more buy firing and cycling the 1911/1911a1. If it doesn't cycle you have too much moly in it remember its a learning process too on how much to use like i said just a little will do. It will get smoother as it works in more too. :rock:

With a semi-auto gun with moly in a very cold hunting/outside situation after the gun has been well used with moly you can just about run it dry in cold very weather because its still in the pores of the metal. I will wipe some out and leave very little moly in it in a very cold situation. It will still cycle and no wear will occur. Moly isn't temperature sensitive like grease is but i still won't leave it with too much in it just to besafe.

My very first chinese sks from the late 80's still has the bluing inside the reciever where the bolt/bolt carrier rides. Moly works that good to reduce all wear.
 
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