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Hi guys. Is it safe to use small magnum primers for .38 spl? If so, how many percent should I reduce the load? I use ADI AS70N which I believe is shipped in the US as Universal Clay. The reason I asked, I could get the primers (Federal) real cheap. Is it worth it?

TIA
vega
 

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I've never tried that in a 38special...
BUT...If a guy was to load down by 15% to start...he MIGHT be oK with re: to higher pressure...Of course...I'd never try it on anyones' guns but mine...I know what condition they're in and what they can handle...Have a care...this isn't something to toy around with...Be absolutely certain you know what you are doing and the chances you're taking...a 357 magnum might handle those easily and a light framed piece from some manufacturer that was a bit spotty with QC could ruin your day...permanently...Just make sure to measure accurately...


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No problems, just start about 15% below max. and work it up from there, using a chronograph. Normally they develop more pressure and have more velocity variation than standard primers, YMMV.
 

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In my experience with my loading and chronograph in the 38 special, I found that switching from regular federal primers to magnum fed primers was the equivalent of a .02grain increase. That was my experience, and you should start low and work your way up. The magnum primers are for proper burning of large amounts of powder in large capacity cases. Using a slower powder like you are it should not be a problem, but shooting a high charge of fast powder(bullseye) would have bad results. I had to use fed mags during the summer of '95 thanks to everyone hoarding primers after brady went into effect. Have a good one, DC

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...One other thing.
They may NOT have a gradual increase. You may get to a certain point and get a spike. So...have a care and DO NOT GET CARELESS on the way up...You should be able to get a load that works just fine...When you do...stop, enjoy it and don't push your luck trying to get "just a little more" outta' the dang thing


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I read a technical article published in American Rifleman or Shooting Times (or... one of those) where rifle-primers were tested for pressure -- standard vs. magnum primers in pressure barrels and using chronographs, etc. (sounded fairly scientific, and I'm easily impressed anyway...)

The surprise was that for many / most loads and powders, the pressure DROPPED (was lower) with the Magnum primers.

This does NOT automatically apply to all loads in all firearms -- but it sure did run opposite of logical linear thinking.

Some brands of Mag. primers burn longer, not just 'hotter' or 'bigger' so combustion improves, and pressure-over-time curves are altered, etc.

One of the guys in Hodgdon's testing lab published a comment recently (on another shooting / reloading board) about mag-primers mechanically breaking down powder kernels, which in turn, changed the powder 'burn-rate' which in turn, increased pressures substantially.

Ya get 10-engineers in a room, and ask a question -- Ya get 12 or 13 different opinions every time. Ya get 10-engineers and ONE accountant in the room, ya get NO OPINIONS at ALL !!! --CC
 
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