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Ok, so today I bought my first rifle (non .22 that is).

I got a beautiful barely used Marlin 336 30-30 for $180!!

So, I guess I have to clean from the muzzle end right?

If not, then how do I go about it.

How clean does the barrel need to be? Should I just use patches or should I use a bronze brush too?

Give me some tips please.

SBLars
 

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You could use a pull-through kit like the ones from Otis. They basically consist of a plastic covered cable which draws the brushes, patch/holders from the breech end. If you do clean from the muzzle with a rod, you'll want to be very careful not to rub the barrel crown with the rod or snag brush shafts/base on it. These are often steel and might damage the crown and affect accuracy. Also, make sure you pass brushes all the way through one way.

No harm in using a brush first time around to clean the bore with some good solvent. Then use patches, and then dry patches until they come out clean. Finally a clean dry patch with something to protect the bore from rust - some solvents are safe to use for this and contain a protectant. Just make sure you swab this out dry before shooting. Also, do not neglect the chamber. Make sure any solvent/lube is swabbed out of there too. I recently came across a product called the "Chamber Maid" at;

http://www.cjweapons.com


You'd have to contact them and see if they have one for the 30-30. If they don't, you can improvise something to get something in there, as well as the locking lug recesses for cleaning. Just make sure anything you cobble together is brass or plastic so as not to scratch anything up. I always swab out the chamber finishing up with a clean-evaporating solvent (no lube/oil or "protectants"). You do not want ANY oils or other stuff lining the chamber when you shoot the gun.

A TINY smidge of grease on the locking lug engagement surfaces is a good idea.

As far as the bolt and action as a whole, I would be very careful as to what and how you lube - as any excess is liable to seep down into the buttstock and rot the wood. Any lever rifle I have had, first time, and then every 6 months or so, I take the stock off and use a spray cleaner/solvent (like Tetra Gun) into, and work the action - including a blast into the firing pin hole. I then stuff it in the bolt-open position with clean rags and or paper towels, and stand it upright. A paper towel piece wadded into the buttstock screw hole at the rear of the receiver, and every other gap to soak up excess lube. Let it stand for 24 hours in a warm dry place. Out in the hot sun for several hours is good. The heat helps to "run" any excess lube out into the rag/paper. Finish up with a good wipe of all exposed surfaces, and re-attach the buttstock and forend.

A good investment would be to track down an owner's manual for the rifle, and seek out anything else you can find out about it on the web using search engines.

You are going to find that there are as many opinions about cleaning guns as there are people that own and shoot them. I would get a good kit to start with like Hoppes, and follow the instructions given. Then try other products and ideas later if you believe they have real merit. I would stay away from Outers cleaning kits - they use their own particular threads on the rods etc, and nothing else will fit them. Hoppes's are universal.

Hey, sounds like you picked up a nice rifle for $180!


[This message has been edited by LAK (edited 10-17-2001).]
 

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The bolt is easily removed from the Marlins, allowing the barrel to be cleaned from the breech end. If I recall properly, one only has to remove one screw, allowing the lever to be removed and the bolt can then be withdrawn. Marlin will send you a manual that covers this.

Rosco
 

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I have a 336 and all you have to do is remove the screw securing the lever in the reciever, and pull it out the bottom. Then the bolt can be removed. As usual, Rosco, is on target.

Mine is in .35 Remington and it is one deer slayer. Bought it in 1974 for $85 new. I am always going into pawn shops around here looking for a 336 with a straight stock in 30-30. One will show up sooner or later at a give away price.

------------------
John

"And by the way, Mr. Speaker, The Second Amendment is not for killing ducks and leaving Huey and Dewey and Louie without an aunt and uncle. It is for hunting politicians like (in) Grozney and in 1776, when they take your independence away".
Robert K. Dornen, U.S. Congressman. 1995
 
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