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Discussion Starter #1
ok, it's not 1911 related, but i've been getting a bunch of different answers from Marlin, so I figured it might be worth posting here.

I've got a friend who smoothed up the trigger on his 1930's era marlin model 39-A with an emery buffer (one of those pink nail-board type things that some women use). Didn't work out too well for him - trigger didn't lighten up much, but hammer started falling to the half-cock notch. probably a lesson here about free-hand trigger jobs.

I don't know anything about marlins, suggested he either have a real gunsmith who knows the firearm work on it, or see if Marlin can sell him new parts at a reasonable cost. short story is marlin sent out a couple of different parts, none of them fit (some were for a different serial # range, and wouldn't even fit in the receiver, others were for the correct serial #, but tolerances were still <way> off and would have required substantial re-shaping to fit in the receiver).

After trying to fit in the second set, I got tired of jerking around with marlin's replacement parts and just re-cut his hammer and sear (sear on this is really just the top of the trigger). Used my Ron Power fixture to stone in the angle on the sear and just re-cut the hammer notch with a file and used my spyderco triangluar sharpening stones.

Ended up with a consistent 4.5 lb trigger pull, no creep, no hammer follow after 50 or so dry-fires (have not had a chance to range test it yet).

Question is this: does anyone know (by rumor or personal experience) whether these parts were heat treated or just surface hardened? I would like to lower the pull a bit to 2.5 lbs or so, but if the material is only surface hardened, then I am a little concerned that I may have exposed the soft (non-treated) metal by taking off a few thousands when I re-cut the sear.

If this is the case, I don't want to take any more off before I treat the metal, otherwise whatever trigger job I end up with will only degrade over time because the sear is too soft too hold its shape. If anyone has any experience with these parts, I'd appreciate your thoughts on this.

Thanks,
Jared
 

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Case Hardening??

I don't know the answer to your question, but I have a related one. Is it possbile to use Kasenit case hardening compound to harden parts like these?

Thanks. . .

Hankster
 

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Kasenit would be the normal answer, but Marlin used a lot of fancy finishes, like color case hardening and gold plating on their hammers and triggers, and the heating required to used Kasenit would ruin the looks (you have to get the part red hot).

FWIW, I think it is probably true that you have a trigger pull that will deteriorate. I don't know of another alternative, though sending it back to Marlin would be one option. Since I don't have either the gun or the parts I have no idea whether they can be made to fit or not, or whether the whole action has been redesigned over the years.

Jim
 

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Yoy may have better luck finding a replacement part with Numrich or at a gun show.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks for everyone's replies. kasenit was my first thought if I had to surface harden the parts myself, but I've never used it and was hoping I could avoid that route. I've read up on the instructions and it doesn't seem too difficult, but I've said that before on projects which went south soon afterwards...

The original parts (which I have recut) don't have any fancy finishes, so I wouldn't lose too much if I have to use kasenit. The replacement parts from Marlin, none of which actually fit, were gold plated (or finished with some gold-colored surface finish). even the parts which were supposed to be (according to marlin) the correct items would require quite a lot of grinding, so I'm inclined just to stay away from them - for all that aggravation, I'll just heat-treat and do a light stoning on the original parts if the trigger degrades after the first few hundred rounds of .22.

Apppreciate everyone's suggestion, thanks for the replies.

Jared
 
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