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I have seen references to "Commercial Colts". I know I have read about this somewhere, but cannot find it. Could someone please enlighten me?

thank you

Richard
:)
 

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Colt Produced 1911s for the military and civillians. Up until colt started the 70 series all civillian colts had either a C prefix(early) or C suffix(later) My 1953 colt has a C suffix even though colt had quit producing 45s for the military.


DSK if I am wrong on anything feel free to correct me:D
 

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You're right. In a nutshell, back when Colt was an active supplier of 1911's to the government you had the military M1911/M1911A1 and the civilian "Government Model", a name which caused confusion for obvious reasons. Since it was confusing to many people to get straight the fact that the Government Model was actually the civilian gun and the M1911/M1911A1 was the military one, a lot of folks simply called them either the commercial or the service models. Colt themselves used similar terminology, as they marked military parts like slides with G for Government contract and S for commercial Sales.

So G means government contract for the M1911 while S means commercial for the Government Model. Confused yet? :p
 

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Is there any truth to the rumor that when Colt was still producing military guns, the commercial models were the military contract rejects? Did the military guns show more care in fit and finish, or were they about the same?

--tdow
 

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Yes and no. The Ordnance Department inspectors were trained to be extremely anal-retentive regarding maintaining original design specifications and quality control. Often times when a defective part or two was discovered the ENTIRE batch was rejected. For example, if a couple of barrels were found to be out of spec the entire batch was rejected, and the factory suddenly found itself with a lot of parts that were perfectly fine but couldn't be used for the military contract. So they were re-inspected by factory inspectors, and if given the go-ahead used in the commercial guns instead.

Again, remember that a part didn't actually have to be defective to be rejected. If drawing specs called for a part to be heat-treated and finished using a certain process, and a different process was used without authorization, then it was often rejected. As a result Colt learned the utility of mix n' match on their commercial guns very early on. :rolleyes:
 

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There was an article in Handgunner, about Paul Liebenberg, and it featured a "Commercial Colt" that he had built. The story suggested that "Commercial Colts" were rejects that were somehow dumped on gunsmiths to be rebuilt/reclaimed; the implication was that ALL Government Model pistols were rejects of some kind. Since Colt wasn't making any G.I. pistols in the 1950s and 1960s, the story left a rather weird impression; where did the guns go that weren't rejected? And who was doing the rejecting?
 

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I dont see how my 1953 model could be a reject. The pistol is tighter and alot better fit than my Kimber. Racking the slide is glass smooth. There is no sound of metal on metal scraping like my kimber. What few rounds Ive shot the colt is very accurate too.
 

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RickB said:
Since Colt wasn't making any G.I. pistols in the 1950s and 1960s, the story left a rather weird impression; where did the guns go that weren't rejected? And who was doing the rejecting?
You can't have something rejected by somebody that isn't buying it in the first place. Sounds like an issue of gun writer headsapce and timing.... go figure.
 
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