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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so im new to reloading and im waiting on a few supplies but i couldnt help playing around with everything and i noticed that the 45acp cases weigh in *deprimed* COMPLETELY different, i mean large amounts, have any of you noticed this? does it cause any issues when weighing out with powder for consistency checks? or am i just reading to much into this lol
 

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There is a signficant difference in empty, deprimed cases depending on headstamp (manufacturer). I haven't kept records, but 5-6 grains, or even a little more, comes to mind between one headstamp and another. Within a given headstamp, the variance seems to be +/- a couple of grains at most.

I'm personally an advocate of weighing loaded rounds looking for squib (no powder) loads and have been successful doing so. The rounds have to be weighed by headstamp however, or the data is so jumbled that its not very usable. I just sort loaded rounds by headstamp, weigh them, and look for the grossly low-weight examples and go from thre.

Some one will be along who will claim this doesn't work, but it does--for me.
Haven't missed one yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks i was just making sure i wasnt the only one, but i mean some of the differences was outstanding i had some SPEER 45acp brass deprimed and noticed a +/- of .25 in some, which to me was just mind boggling. i have sorted them and im keeping a detailed record of all cuz its just interesting data to me, so far the most inconsistent seems to be the Wolf ammo.
 

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Most of us don't reload any wolf ammo ( I think its all steel anyway / not brass ) - but you're right, there is a big deviation in the weight of cases - especially between different head stamp brands.

Because of that / you would have difficulty weighing a completed cartridge - and veryifying the powder drop of 4.5 grains say in a finished cartridge. The other variance you're going to find is in the bullets / depending on the brand you use a 230gr bullet ( like Rainier Ballistics, I've seen vary 4 or 5 grains ) ....

What it comes down to / you have to be sure your procedures are 100% - especially on powder drops. You won't be able to rely on weighing the final cartridges - to make sure you got the right powder drops.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
im using a lock and load progressive and i figure i will just weigh the case once i reprime it, then load the powder and re-weigh that case to see, till i get it down. ive heard this powder drop is pretty accurate.
 

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so im new to reloading and im waiting on a few supplies but i couldnt help playing around with everything and i noticed that the 45acp cases weigh in *deprimed* COMPLETELY different, i mean large amounts, have any of you noticed this? does it cause any issues when weighing out with powder for consistency checks? or am i just reading to much into this lol
Have you measured the case length? That might account for some of the difference.
 

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Well, welcome to the world of reloading. No components are precise, nor are they dimensionally consistent, nor can you rely upon a single manufacturer from year to year. Sorry, dudes. Even gunpowder varies from lot to lot. And if you think the components vary, the operator is clearly the most variable and least reliable part of the whole process. That's why we have to be methodical and meticulous about everything we do, and stick to published data and conventional practices.



Please, don't think that you can bet your life on being able to weigh a complete cartridge and tell if it's missing powder. The bullet weight will vary plus or minus 2 grains, and the cases will vary plus or minus 2 or 3 grains. If you're missing 4.5 grains of powder, you won't be able to bet your life on it. Or your fingers. Or eyes.
 

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might be a dumb question
No, not a dumb question.
All safety related questions are smart questions.

Do you have any books or manuals to go with that press? Hornady manual has excellent chapters on the process. How about Lyman, Speer, Sierra? ABC's of Reloading? Nosler? Or even Lee?
 

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Well, welcome to the world of reloading. No components are precise, nor are they dimensionally consistent, nor can you rely upon a single manufacturer from year to year.
Nick speaks the gospel here

I remember when I built my first chopper back in 73’ (56’ Panhead)
Everything I bought for it that wasn’t HD was marked “CUSTOM”

That really meant you had to bend it, grind it, cut it, beat on it or break it to make it fit or work.

The variations in Handloading components is very similar
Inspection and measuring are a rigor of the pastime.
(I miss that old Panhead)

Good Luck :)
 

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Weighing loaded rounds is not a reliable method for determining "no powder" or "too much." Too many variables as Nick outlined. Period. New reloaders have a choice. You can heed this warning, or you can take a chance with your gun and health.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
i currently have the latest hornady book, and the latest Lee book. ive read both of them, seperated all the brass not by maker, but by similar weights. i plan on sticking to what ever the book says specially because from what i have read they keep it on the safe side so they dont get to many issues :biglaugh: once the rest of my pieces get here i can load a case or 2 and give them a shot, im sure i will have alot more questions as time rolls on, being that this is a hobby where its test and tune its good to know people that have been perfecting it for a lot longer than me :biglaugh:
 

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I'm new to reloading too. I think weighing finished rounds to determine how much powder they hold is misguided. A heavy bullet combined with a heavy case could hide a low powder charge.
Why not do the weighing where it is most accurate? Weigh individual charges and put them in the cases. You don't have to do each one. It's no more work, it's probably less.
Here's how I do it; I drop a charge into a brass case, dump the charge into the scales pan, watch the balance indicator bob up, then down to the proper level indicator, pour it back into the case and move on to the next case.
I weigh out every fifth or tenth case I'm loading. The powder thrower is reliable.
Use those scales when they will do you the most good; as you're charging the cases. This is the most accurate way.
For safety, I load up (charge) 50 cases in a loading block. I take the loading block outside into full sunlight and look over the batch to see that they are nearly the same level in each brass case. Eyeballing the batch this way will reveal any uncharged / double charged cases.
btw. I shoot 45 ACP out of a Kimber 1911 pistol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
oh i never ment that i would weigh out the finished round i ment after its primed then i know the constant, throw the powder, then weigh, get the powder measure right then, like you said weigh every 5th or 6th round, i dont mind doing it, its actually relaxing
 

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Cool, darkside. To make the job faster, weigh a dozen primed cases before you start loading and write their weights on the side of the brass with a Sharpie. Then use one of those cases every 10 rounds to check your powder charge.
 
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