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Just bought one brand new. Are there any parts that you guys would recommend that I change out to make it better or more accurate???
 

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I would spend the money on ammo. Unless there is something malfunctioning, I wouldn't change anything. As far as accuracy, a lot of that depends on your individual accuracy/proficiency. My firearms are all far more accurate than I am, so the only things I've done recently was change out a couple of front sights to fiber optic, but that was more due to my eye sight decline than accuracy of the pistols.
 

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First, shoot the piece with different kinds of ammo at a set distance. You have to be able to " establish a baseline " so that you will exactly know if there is anything that needs changing to " improve " the gun.
 

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Yes, it may not need anything. My milspec ati just needed new grips, because the old ones were ugly. I usually replace the slide release with an extended one, and this one also may need a trigger job or adjustable trigger.

I'll find out after I shoot it some more.
 

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MSH only on mine only because my other 1911's have that other wise I would have left it alone. Shoots well.
Yes. MSH. I can't stand my arched housing and will be switching it out soon to a flat MSH.

Briney11, shoot the gun first. You just might like it how it is. Keep an eye on your ejector as they seem to loosen up.
 

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I've replaced everything on my Mil-Spec, turning it into a full custom gun but first I shot it quite a bit to find what I liked and didn't. I replaced the ILS, installed a beavertail safety and installed C&S ignition parts before the opportunity to have custom work done. I didn't do the beavertail that well and the 'smith welded it and re-did it. :)
 

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I recommend:

Replace MSH and guts with a quality unit (Wilson, Brown, Springfield)

Wolff 20lb mainspring, standard extra power firing pin spring

EGW steel firing pin
 

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Don't replace anything major until you shoot it. A lot. It is fully capable of 25 yd 2"-3" groups out of the box if you do your part.
Once you break it in after a few hundred rounds, the trigger will be smoothed out, and it should function flawlessly just as it is.
At that point you will be able to determine what changes you might want to make.
 

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+1 on what proffett said...!
Just shoot the snot out of it and enjoy!!! As you shoot it more, you'll naturally come to see what you need to do to it. They're great guns!!!
 

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Don't replace anything major until you shoot it. A lot. It is fully capable of 25 yd 2"-3" groups out of the box if you do your part.
Once you break it in after a few hundred rounds, the trigger will be smoothed out, and it should function flawlessly just as it is.
At that point you will be able to determine what changes you might want to make.
This is what I did with mine. It's been 100% reliable and more accurate than me. After 500 rounds or so I knew what I wanted to do to make it right for me.
 

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Shoot it first, you may be surprised. I have two stock milspecs (NM prefix on each). Both shoot exceptionally well. 50 yard groups put 5 shots in a ragged US quarter sized group (I posted a picture of the target on another thread on this forum).

My load was 4 grains of Bullseye over a 200 grain homecast SWC bullet (SAECO flat base #69), sized .452" and crimped to .470".

For potential changes, mostly for ergonomics, I'd consider getting a trigger job for a crisp 4 lb pull, and a proper length trigger. The stock trigger is a "short" trigger. I like a "long trigger" myself (tip: check the actual length of the triggers, not all "long" triggers are the same size. Fold over some cardboard /plastic and tape in on the front of the trigger untill you find it "right", then measure the length from the back/front.)

Preference is for the mainspring housing. I like the arched better, with chechering, and use a "Zinns grip"-as in Brian Zinns- (fits in the thumb crease of my hand very well for alignment).

Check your ejector. One of mine was extended. One was not, and the extended ejector through brass out at 4 o'clock. The non-extended ejector tossed the empty brass over and into my head.

Here's my thoughts on "accurizing". Shoot a rested, two-hand series of groups at whatever distance you choose (10, 25, 50 yards), and get a good base-line for what the potential accuracy is of the pistol. Then, shoot the same ammo at the similarly chosen distance, but with one or two hands (depending on how you choose to shoot it for your purposes). Then compare groups sizes at that distance. If your unsupported group size is twice as big as your rested group size, then that tells you have the potential to improve group size solely by improving your shooting technique.

I am aware that all errors are additive, and a firearm that puts all it's shots in one hole has more accuracy potential, but that is just POTENTIAL. Work on your technique. You'll have more fun getting familiar with your milspec that way.

The trigger pull and length ("fit") are important for a basic pistol. After those "modifications", just shoot it, dry fire it, and work on trigger control, and sight alignment.

Great gun.
 
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