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What are the steps involved in changing the trigger pull in your 1911. if it makes any difference, more specifically a springfield loaded or a springfield XD(M)? also, what would be the tools required for this modification?
 

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If you aren't a seasoned 1911 shooter or setting up a bullseye gun please don't go that light,it can get you in trouble.If your trigger is just heavy adjusting the spring only can get you 4lbs easy but working the sear will eliminate the creep so it breaks cleaner.You don't have to work the hammer at all for a nice trigger and save the price if a jig but it won't get you the "ah,beautiful" job.I use Ed Brown's sear jig and Tom Wilson's hammer jig with a fine India stone and fine ceramic one-one day I'll reak down and spend the money on a good Arkansas(sp?) stone.I don't like the fixed pin blocks so I use the frame mounted ones to compensateif the pin holes are off spec.Brownells has a nice looking adjustable pin block but it ain't cheap. Trigger fitting can be done with a fine file and stone or fine sandpaper on a block.

Hope this helps and thank you for your part in serving this country- although I'm tired of you guys dying for this fiasco.Be safe man and hope you come home soon!

Oops,don't know squat about the XD setup,sorry.Also ran into your other post you know your way around with a gun I take it.Those 2lb triggers are nice.
 

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The tools are the easy part (all you need is money). Get a Brownell's catalog. But before you touch anything with a stone you have to understand exactly how the parts all interact with each other on the gun you are wanting to modify. For 1911 work the standard reference is Jerry Kuhnhausen's 1911 Shop Manual Vol 1. It is well written and should keep you out of trouble mainly because he is constantly telling you what NOT to do. (He has seen a lot of mistakes) Bill Wilson's book on custom 1911 work is pretty good but the photography is so bad you can't hardly tell what he is describing. There are also a number of DVDs out there but I am not familiar with them since I started smithing before the digital age. Read everything you can find and talk to people who have a good smithing reputation. Go slow and expect to screw up parts in the beginning. The most important thing to learn on trigger work is how far you can go before you create an unsafe situation for the customer. Good Luck.
 

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The easiest way to work on 1911 triggers is with a dremel.
 

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What if I like everything about my trigger except that it has the tiniest bit of creep?
(It's an EGW Kit in a four inch Kimber)
I don't believe the sear has any relief cut as George leaves that up to the fitter for exact feel in the individual gun desired. Excellent parts. Add relief and the creep will disappear.

LOG
 

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What are the steps involved in changing the trigger pull in your 1911. if it makes any difference, more specifically a springfield loaded or a springfield XD(M)? also, what would be the tools required for this modification?
first off, which weapon do you have? a 1911 and an XD are totally different animals and require completely separate methodologies for modifying the trigger pull.
 

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What if I like everything about my trigger except that it has the tiniest bit of creep?
(It's an EGW Kit in a four inch Kimber)
Does your trigger have any amount of play (vertical or horizontal)?
If you pull the trigger, even sightly different w/ a little play like that it will seem like there is a lil creep. Pulling the trigger straight will help.
Disregard if the above does not apply.:)
 

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Does your trigger have any amount of play (vertical or horizontal)?
If you pull the trigger, even sightly different w/ a little play like that it will seem like there is a lil creep. Pulling the trigger straight will help.
Disregard if the above does not apply.:)
Nope, it's straight back, weighted pre-travel, of sorts. It might be a 16th of an inch, give or take. If I apply pressure through the creep, but not enough to actually release the hammer, then, prior to reset, the creep is gone when I do pull the trigger all the way through. This sounds like a job for someone qualified.
 

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maestro,
Can you further define 'qualified'.
We have recently seen a post by an individual that uses a Dremel to finish his trigger jobs.
:confused:
 

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Nope, it's straight back, weighted pre-travel, of sorts. It might be a 16th of an inch, give or take. If I apply pressure through the creep, but not enough to actually release the hammer, then, prior to reset, the creep is gone when I do pull the trigger all the way through. This sounds like a job for someone qualified.
I'll agree w/ the "qualified".
I had a shop fix the trigger on my .45 recently, it had lots a creep, w/ a heavy spot in the middle. They used the factory trigger and it feels real good. I don't remember what it was like from the factory, seems creep free now and according to their work list, "4 1/2# trigger job, std. carry".
 

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For those in SE TX, the term "qualified 1911 gunsmith" can be defined by two words: "Gary Dean".

ymmv
 

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