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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone familiar with the spring in question???

I've been fiddling with improving the trigger on mine for some time now.

It seems to me that if I cut a few coils off of the firing-pin spring, I could maybe lessen the trigger pull a bit.

Now, there appears to be ENTIRELY to much pressure on that spring to begin with.

When you pull the trigger, you can feel and hear how much pressure is on it by the audible "THWACK" of it's release.

I'm just curious if anyone else has attempted this and how it worked out for ya.
 

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The stronger firing springs are for the harder primers in the military ammo. If your going to play with cutting the spring i would look at wolf springs to see if they offer a lighter spring first. If not i would buy an extra spring to cut and play with. If you have two exact springs you could cut one down until it will won't fire military ammo then cut the other one a tad longer so it does. You need to measure it at every cut so you know were the spring pressure falls off to where it won't work. Keep in mind it still has to be reliable.

You can also put some moly on the sears mating parts too. It will lessen the trigger pull. I would do the work on the sear first by lubing it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The stronger firing springs are for the harder primers in the military ammo. If your going to play with cutting the spring i would look at wolf springs to see if they offer a lighter spring first. If not i would buy an extra spring to cut and play with. If you have two exact springs you could cut one down until it will won't fire military ammo then cut the other one a tad longer so it does. You need to measure it at every cut so you know were the spring pressure falls off to where it won't work. Keep in mind it still has to be reliable.

You can also put some moly on the sears mating parts too. It will lessen the trigger pull. I would do the work on the sear first by lubing it.
Good info!!!

Just to let you know what I've already done...

1. Shimmed Sear Spring

2. Polished all trigger metal to metal contact points

3. Polished Sear/Trigger engagement surfaces

I must say, the pull is MUUUUUCH shorter and lighter...but still too heavy for my taste.

I don't have a gauge, but it's about twice as hard to pull as the trigger on my 1911 which is set at 3.5lbs.

I'm guessing the Mosin trigger is 6-7lbs.

I had not thought of moly coating the Sear/Trigger engagement surfaces.

Seems like a good idea.

I forget the name of the company, but somebody sells an upgrade trigger for the Mosin for like $80 that is supposed to radically improve trigger pull, but I'm seeing what I can get away with for next to nothing.

I do primarily shoot Russian Surplus ammo through it...so if the primer is tougher, I agree that I should probably get a spring to play with and keep one stock.

Again, GREAT post!!!

Thanks!!!
 

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If you cut a couple of coils off of the firing pin spring, you're not going to notice much trigger pull difference, but you will notice that the primers don't get hit as hard. Some older mil-surp has to be hit REALLY hard. I know it costs as much as a Mosin, but I bought one and it was the best thing I could do for accuracy to it.

http://huberconcepts.com/Mosin-Nagant_Trigger_Replacement.htm

Occasionally they come up on eBay. Keep an eye out. I put one in my Mosin and my 1903a3 and I've never looked back. John makes a great trigger and has great customer service. One of the nice things about his Mosin trigger is that it's fully adjustable. The sear rides on a ball bearing and makes ALL the difference.

Edit: I got my trigger pull all the way down to 1.5 lbs before I backed it off to 3 lbs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you cut a couple of coils off of the firing pin spring, you're not going to notice much trigger pull difference, but you will notice that the primers don't get hit as hard. Some older mil-surp has to be hit REALLY hard. I know it costs as much as a Mosin, but I bought one and it was the best thing I could do for accuracy to it.

http://huberconcepts.com/Mosin-Nagant_Trigger_Replacement.htm

Occasionally they come up on eBay. Keep an eye out. I put one in my Mosin and my 1903a3 and I've never looked back. John makes a great trigger and has great customer service. One of the nice things about his Mosin trigger is that it's fully adjustable. The sear rides on a ball bearing and makes ALL the difference.
THAT'S IT!!!

That's the trigger I was talking about.

I might have to just bite the bullet and shell out the dough for one of those.

It costs about as much as I paid for the rifle, but if it really improves the trigger pull that much I should probably quit screwing around and just get one.

THANKS!!!
 

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I cannot say enough about John's product. I even lost the ball bearing a couple of years back (being stupid of course.) I sent him an email asking to buy a new one and he sent me 2 new ones free of charge. Seriously good stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you cut a couple of coils off of the firing pin spring, you're not going to notice much trigger pull difference, but you will notice that the primers don't get hit as hard. Some older mil-surp has to be hit REALLY hard. I know it costs as much as a Mosin, but I bought one and it was the best thing I could do for accuracy to it.

http://huberconcepts.com/Mosin-Nagant_Trigger_Replacement.htm

Occasionally they come up on eBay. Keep an eye out. I put one in my Mosin and my 1903a3 and I've never looked back. John makes a great trigger and has great customer service. One of the nice things about his Mosin trigger is that it's fully adjustable. The sear rides on a ball bearing and makes ALL the difference.

Edit: I got my trigger pull all the way down to 1.5 lbs before I backed it off to 3 lbs.
1.5lbs???

THAT'S IT!!!

I'm getting one!!! :rock::rock::rock:
 

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However far down you go, just make sure that you bump the stock on the ground pretty hard, cocked on an empty chamber, to see if the firing pin lets go. At 1.5 lbs, the firing pin would hold on it's own, but if you bumped it too hard, it'd let go on it's own. The point of engagement for the bolt and sear is often rounded off from lots of use. At 3 lbs, mine holds firm no matter what.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
However far down you go, just make sure that you bump the stock on the ground pretty hard, cocked on an empty chamber, to see if the firing pin lets go. At 1.5 lbs, the firing pin would hold on it's own, but if you bumped it too hard, it'd let go on it's own. The point of engagement for the bolt and sear is often rounded off from lots of use. At 3 lbs, mine holds firm no matter what.
Right on!!!

Have you done any other mods to yours???

I've floated the barrel on mine, and placed a small thin layer of cork at the end of the stock to give a LITTLE bit of upwards force near the end of the barrel.

This REALLY HAS improved the accuracy of the rifle.

It maintains it's level of accuracy no matter how long I shoot it.

I was going to bed the receiver, but I've decided to get one of those ATI synthetic stocks for it.

I'll bed it to the ATI stock rather than the wood one in case I ever wanna put it back in original condition.

Good look on the "Drop Test"!!!

I'm actually familiar with this test.

Like I said, I've done a bit of work to improve the trigger, and the Drop Test is crucial when shimming the sear spring.
 

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I've got an ATI stock on mine as well. With the stock and the trigger, zero stays pretty much on the money. If I really wanted to, I could do a glass bed job. However I do not think that is necessary for a recreational shooter.
 
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