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Discussion Starter #1
I've heard this discribed as "two in the heart one to the head". Anyone familiar with this? I assume it originated in Mozambique? What is the proper drill, how fast and at what range should it be used?
 

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Originally posted by BB:
I've heard this discribed as "two in the heart one to the head". Anyone familiar with this? I assume it originated in Mozambique? What is the proper drill, how fast and at what range should it be used?
If I recall correctly it was inspired by a report someone sent in to Jeff Cooper about the leader of a patrol who ran into a "terr" in Mozambique. I think he was armed with a S&W 39 (no idea what ammo but likely it was ball). He shot the guy something like 8 times in the chest at very close range with no visible results and then... with only one round left he put one "between the running lights".

Jeff pointed out that one should not take quite so long to figure out that this was not working. As Einstein wrote: "Insantity is trying the same thing over and over and expecting different results". So he introduced a drill into his curriculum that dealt with two shots to the body and one to the head.

Been a long time but I think that is the way the story goes.

There are 3 "Mozambiques" (though at shorter range than the drill is done at Gunsite) in the IDPA Classifier. It is not done concealed (unless you want). My partner Dalton does it in about 1.7, all A's. But most people slow down in a match to make sure they don't drop a point. I imagine 2 would be adequate at 5-7 yards. 2.5 is good at 10 yards.

Cordially,
Jim Higginbotham
 

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Most people are taught to shoot for the upper torso since the head's a tough shot. Maybe the last one in the head's more like a coup de grace.
 

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Folks...

Not to step on coat tails. The drill did orginate in Mozambique, but there were some slight differences. The individual was a well respected and close friend of Col. Cooper who had been in that neck of the woods "training". When he decided to depart and through regular channels, the airport he came across a lone gunmen armed with an AK-47. For whatever reason the youth unslung his weapon and decided to make contact. Recognizing the extreme of the situation he deployed his trusty BHP (common to the area) and proceeded to place two solid center punch hits to the upper torso, standard response. Came to the guard and had begun to admire his work when he realized the youth was marginally interested in his response and proceeded to hasten his actions. Realizing the gravity of the situation he attempts to remedy the situation with one well placed round to the head. Unfortunately he misses and hits the C-spine instead and drops our antagonist.

For clarity sakes, a Mozambique drill would be two to the chest in rapid succession or standard response. Break the sights and come to the guard to access. Realize the unwanted effects and transition to a dedicated head shot.

We are more apt to suggest a Failure to Stop drill. Very similar, but different. Controlled/accelerated pair to the chest and as the front sight comes back into your focal plane after the second shot, immediately superimpose it on the head or where the head would be. If the head is in visual press off the round. We may assume our intial shots were marginally interesting due to drugs/alcohol or the presence of armor or we missed. If the head is not where it is suppose to be, follow the threat to the ground and make sure they do not need any extra wieght to help.

The premise behind this drill is the assumption our shots were not effective when the front sight is superimposed on the head. Time is not present to break the sights at the guard to reassess and then transition to the dedicated head shot. Therefore, we remove the reassess and press off the round. Either case both drills are very effective. Hope this helps.

Later,


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Director of Training

The HALO Group

[This message has been edited by DOT, The HALO Group (edited 03-13-2001).]
 

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BB, something else to consider. While two to the heart sounds like a great idea, then one to the head, if you actualy have that much control and your target isn't moving around, there is no reason to put two shots to the heart.

Here is the deal. Two shots anywhere should not be closer than about 3-4" apart. Why? Because the wound and wound channel damage created by the first shot will be the same damage area of the second shot. In other words, the second shot will be damaging already damaged tissues. This can result in there being no significant change in the disposition of the intended target. By separating your rounds a little, more actual damage will be done.

Of course, where you heard two to the heart may have just been your instructor's way of saying two shots center of mass and the instructor never figured you would land both shots in the heart given target movement and shooter movement.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So in short, we're talking about a DT COM to the upper torso followed by targeting the head (or where the head should be) without breaking sights; if heads is present (assume failure to stop) then shoot. And the drill should be used at any range, or is there a max range you would use this at? If so, what do you guys suggest for longer ranges?

Double Naught Spy,
Yeah, actually that was how our SSDF training instructor descibed the drill- "two to the heart, one to the head, guarantees the target is dead"
Marines!



[This message has been edited by BB (edited 03-13-2001).]
 

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BB...

That is a pretty good summary. The max distance we do this drill is at 10 yards. After that it gets pretty tough. Past 10 yards we would suggestion continuing to apply hits to the COM. How do you know what distance you are at, you won't. The best thing to do, train at the different yard lines and determine what you are capable of under stress. After that you will have a pretty good idea of your effectiveness with the technique. Hope this helps.

Later,


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Director of Training

The HALO Group
 

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Why on earth would you put 2 in the chest and _then_ 1 to the head if you have the ability and the sitution allows to get a head shot first ???

If the BG is on the ground and still moving then that is called The " Coup`DeGras " (sp) and has been around since the Roman Legionary used his short sword to "cleanup" the battlefield.
 

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Originally posted by Blackjack:
Why on earth would you put 2 in the chest and _then_ 1 to the head if you have the ability and the sitution allows to get a head shot first ???
A reasonable question. In my view, the head is too tough a shot to use as "plan A". Absent visible body armor, going for the center-of-mass is a better, quicker to execute "plan A". If "plan A" doesn't work, then its time to go to "plan B"...a head shot. It's still a tough shot, but tough sh*t
, no one ever said life would be fair.

You also might want to rethink your "on the ground but still moving" criteria. He may be on the ground and continuing to attempt to use deadly force on you. If that's the case, then the fight is still on. If he's simply "moving" then you may move out of the realm of lawful self-defense if you strike additional blows.

Rosco



[This message has been edited by Rosco Benson (edited 03-13-2001).]
 

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Rosco

Thanks for the clarification, just trying to understand " The Drill " and the reasoning behind it.

>>> You also might want to rethink your "on the ground but still moving" criteria. <<<

Just for the record not my Criteria in any way if the fight is over.
 

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Originally posted by DOT, The HALO Group:

<snippage>Folks...

Not to step on coat tails. The drill did orginate in Mozambique, but there were some slight differences. The individual was a well respected and close friend of Col. Cooper who had been in that neck of the woods "training". When he decided to depart and through regular channels,
Not stepping on coat tails at all
I think the story you relate is the same as reported in a Gunsite Gossip sometime in the early 90s and involves a guy named Mike Rouseau (or something like that).

The model 39 and 8 shot story was told to our 499 class as we sat around a campfire at Gunsite in 1980, in a driving snow ... things change I guess


Of course 20 years ago is pretty long to remember but I tend to pay attention in the presence of the Col. - now if I could just remember where I put my glasses
I should add that this could have been Chuck Taylor, who was Operations Officer and the #2 instructor in that class who was actually doing the talking at the time.

Much agreement on the "failure to stop". You don't have to pull the gun down to know that there is still a threat visible around the sight.

I have all but abandoned the "standard response" of two shots - too many folks seem able to withstand multiple hist from 9mms and .357 magnums. Nowadays I stress *at least two shots* but then there is no use spending an excessive amount of time so 3 or 4 on 1 target (and then only if there were no more visible threats) without effect and we better be going to "plan B".

The pelvis sure ain't plan B, people shoot well from prone. One of Tom's men got shot in the abdomen (hit the pelvis) with a .357 mag. He did go down but was able to perfectly place his shot on his assailant who was gleefully running away with the loot when the bullet overtook him


Persevere!
Jim Higginbotham




[This message has been edited by JimH (edited 03-13-2001).]
 

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In the Colonel's words:

"As time passes we discover that there are a good many readers who have not been to school and who are puzzled by our reference to "The Mozambique Drill."

"I added The Mozambique Drill to the modern doctrine after hearing of an experience of a student of mine up in Mozambique when that country was abandoned. My friend was involved in the fighting that took place around the airport of Laurenco Marquez. At one point, Mike turned a corner and was confronted by a terrorist carrying an AK47. The man was advancing toward him at a walk at a range of perhaps 10 paces. Mike, who was a good shot, came up with his P35 and planted two satisfactory hits, one on each side of the wishbone. He expected his adversary to drop, but nothing happened, and the man continued to close the range. At this point, our boy quite sensibly opted to go for the head and tried to do so, but he was a little bit upset by this time and mashed slightly on the trigger, catching the terrorist precisely between the collar bones and severing his spinal cord. This stopped the fight.

"Upon analysis, it seemed to me that the pistolero should be accustomed to the idea of placing two shots amidships as fast as he can and then being prepared to change his point of aim if this achieves no results. Two shots amidships can be placed very quickly and very reliably and they will nearly always stop the fight providing a major-caliber pistol is used and the subject is not wearing body armor. However, simply chanting "two in the body, one in the head" oversimplifies matters, since it takes considerably longer to be absolutely sure of a head shot than it does to be quite sure of two shots in the thorax. The problem for the shooter is to change his pace, going just as fast as he can with his first pair, then, pausing to observe results or lack thereof, he must slow down and shoot precisely. This is not easy to do. The beginner tends to fire all three shots at the same speed, which is either too slow for the body shots or too fast for the head shot. This change of pace calls for concentration and coordination which can only be developed through practice.

"Mike Rouseau was later killed in action in the Rhodesian War. May he rest in peace!"

Cooper's Commentaries, I,I
 
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