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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
45 years ago I used air/acetylene for silver brazing with a “B” tank. Worked. Sometimes had to stack charcoal around the pieces to retain heat. Bigger things like the bottom bracket on a bicycle frame made from scratch.

40 years ago I switched to a fairly big oxy acetylene torch. Used it with MAPP gas for 20 years. I came to like MAPP. Tank would last forever. Now using oxy/acetylene.

As I have aged, harder to do very precision work with silver braze and a very large torch (very small orifice tip).

Girlfriend has ordered up a Smith jewelry torch for my birthday.

Any suggestions for gas? I do have a spare regulator or two around here. Dedicated tanks to the small rig? I know that jewelers frequently use hydrogen/oxygen but I think that is mostly required for gold.

I have used tig for brazing with brass in the distant past. Worked slick but I was much younger. Anyone try tig for silver braze?

Therapur got me back into itty bitty silver braze projects. I have been doing “gold” (brass) beads with my big torch but it is a bit unwieldy with my big torch. Just trying to retain my hand skills.

Thanks in advance.
 

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I picked up a small brazing head for my oxy/ace work. It works great and is easier to maneuver, sorry but I don’t remember the size. Tig is the way to go, just not so portable. I am looking into a setup to add to my welder but getting a cooling water unit is slowing me down. We had some great units at work but I retired so I’m missing it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You must have done a lot of tig if you needed the cooler. I got by without the cooling unit.

I haven’t flipped the switch on my tig in 10 years. I should fire it up.

I always preferred a traditional torch to tig. Could be that I grew up on gas welding. No doubt that you can do things with tig that are pretty difficult, if not impossible, with gas.
 

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I learned welding with the oxy/ace torch, and it is the easiest form of welding to take into the field.
Yes, I did most of my professional welding with Tig, it’s unrivaled for precision work. I suppose I could run without a cooler, just hadn’t thought about it because it was the only way I welded. Much of my work was with stainless specialty fittings and pipe work.
These days my Lincoln Mig Welder is my main machine, along with my oxy torch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have an old (heavy) Lincoln Ideal Arc 250 tig welder. Bought it forever ago when a vocational tech school closed. Minimum setting is 8 amps. Worked well for what I was using it for at the time. I am a creature of habit. Silver has worked well for me for a long time. Goes slow too, which helps. I use mig mostly on things that don’t matter much like garden tractors. I suppose that I could try tig on some old thumb safeties to bring new life.
 

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i used a Lincoln IdealArc for years back, i retired in 2010, we had the water coolers on a pair of them. also had a midsize Linclon Mig machine, don't remember the Amp size. our IdealArc's were each ste up for stick and Tig, water and multiple Bottles of Argon and Argon/Helium, i think. man, i miss those days...
i used to do a lot of Aluminum with the Tig. one of my friends brought in 6 Chevy intake manifolds. i removed and welded some ports, the added some in a different configuration, turned regular V-8 intakes into Corvette intakes. i was pretty proud of those, it was nearly impossible to tell they were modified. had some pics but have no idea where they ended up...
 

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I Tig welded for over 30 years, the great thing about Tig is it’s flexibility. Stainless and Aluminum are it’s main use but brass is it’s beauty. Silver and copper are possible with specialty rods but all Tig welds come out pure and shining because of the inert gas shielding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I tried out the Smith torch. Looks like acetylene is the way to go. More versatile according to the instructions. Hydrogen would work fine according to the booklet. I decided to use an old “B” acetylene tank and an adapter to get to the standard regulator thread. Went with a 60 cubic foot oxygen cylinder. Welding gas place didn’t have the small tote size set up. Just as well I suppose. If I had that, I would be using it at my coffee table in the living room. I probably should have just used my bigger gas bottles and been done with it. Smith torch is really tiny. It is growing on me.

I tried some low voltage DC fuse welding. Homemade set up was unimpressive. I may try making a current limiter for my TIG. That is going to have to wait for bad weather. Snowy day experiment.
 

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I tried out the Smith torch. Looks like acetylene is the way to go. More versatile according to the instructions. Hydrogen would work fine according to the booklet. I decided to use an old “B” acetylene tank and an adapter to get to the standard regulator thread. Went with a 60 cubic foot oxygen cylinder. Welding gas place didn’t have the small tote size set up. Just as well I suppose. If I had that, I would be using it at my coffee table in the living room. I probably should have just used my bigger gas bottles and been done with it. Smith torch is really tiny. It is growing on me.

I tried some low voltage DC fuse welding. Homemade set up was unimpressive. I may try making a current limiter for my TIG. That is going to have to wait for bad weather. Snowy day experiment.
Is this what you are using? Looks pretty nice.
 
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