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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
This is my first post on this board. It seems very informative.
Here is the situation. I just traded a used Sig 226 and two mags for a Loaded 1911 with 3 mags, holster, and ammo. The tritium rear site has been replaced with an adjustable site but is othewise near new in box. I just fired 150 rounds of 230 gr FMJ without failure. He had fired about the same amount before the trade. My other 1911 is a highly modified Norinco. I imediately noticed a sharper recoil than the Norinco. The trigger was bad, with many small burrs that were painful. The diamond checkered grips were less than confortable. However the pain to my wrist (have previous injury) was worse than I ever experianced. Had to ice it down for a few hours.
Is this common for Springfields? My Norinco does not bother me at all. What is the best way to tame the recoil? I have already cleaned up the burrs and put Pachmeyer grips on. I really like this pistol and want to make it work. Any advice?
Thanks
 

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To a small degree, both the hammer spring and recoil spring affect PERCEIVED recoil, because the slide of the gun actually acts as a recoil absorber that spreads the recoil energy out over time. A softer hammer spring lets the slide move rearward (unlock) sooner and a softer recoil spring allows the slide to move more easily to soak up energy at the expense of a stiffer jolt when it hits the frame. Some say the multiple spring aftermarket rod/spring assemblies help, some claim shok-buffs help.

The best thing to do is go to a lighter grain ammo that isn't loaded hot. Try 165 or 180 grain ammo and down load as necessary. That can necessitate using a lighter recoil spring to get good cycling, but recoil will be significantly reduced.
 

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Yeah, I suggest playing with the recoil and hammer spring weights. Wilson has multiple to choose from. The Shok-Buffs may help too. Different ammo, or a grip change may be necessary.

I have not noticed any unusual recoil with my loaded, and the Rosewood grips were very sharp at first, but get much more comfortable with time.

Hershey
 

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Identical loads in different pistols of equal size/weight should feel the same.
 

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Yeah, I'mnot really sure why it would seem to recoil more unless it was modified in some way or something. My loaded doesn't seem to be a stif recoiler. Its almost preferable to my 357 sig and 40 S&W guns.
 

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I found my Lightweight Bi-Tone to kick a bit much. I swapped the grips to wraparound Hogue soft rubber, and I find it far more manageable. It fits my hand better so the gun doesn't bang around anymore. Where even 50 rounds might leave my wrist a little sore, I feel like I can shoot the thing all day now.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks to all who replied. As I stated the recoil seems sharper in the Springfield than the Norinco. I had a few friends try both and it was unanimous that the Springfield was noticibly different in recoil. I enjoy the Norinco and have no problems with the recoil. I will have to try and find out what springs are in the Norinco (bought new in 1994). I might even swap them to see if that's the problem.
Thanks for the responses.
 

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You haven't changed the springs in the Rinco in nine years? That is a regular maintenance item!
 

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OpRN said:
Thanks to all who replied. As I stated the recoil seems sharper in the Springfield than the Norinco. I had a few friends try both and it was unanimous that the Springfield was noticibly different in recoil. I enjoy the Norinco and have no problems with the recoil. I will have to try and find out what springs are in the Norinco (bought new in 1994). I might even swap them to see if that's the problem.
Thanks for the responses.
The firmer new springs will definitely make the recoil feel a bit sharper because it delays slide movement and absorbs less energy at the instant of firing.

I sure wouldn't put old beat dead springs in a new gun, I'd put new springs for the old one.
 
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