1911Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
404 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I want start reloading, but I have met some resistance from the wife. Before I invoke my male executive rights... I hope she does not read that :rolleyes:... I would like to answer her questions. First how stable is the powder? She believe it will blowup out without an ignition source. I have tried to explain the ignition point in terms of fire science, but it did not work. I will not reload more then a few hundred rounds a week. I am not sure how much power I would keep on hand, but I would not think a lot. She is also concerned about safety, and I have tried to tell her that it is as safe as the reloader. I thought this would be good enough since I am a perfectionist with my work. Any help in this area would be great!

I also have a question about which reloader. I am planning on getting a Lee model. I know that these are not the most liked product, but I believe it will meet my needs. I am looking at their single press kit that is about 75.00 or their progressive pro 1000 reloader that is about 125.00. I have searched this forum and have found the pro 1000 does have some primer issues, but I will be moving slow anyway. I do not foresee me reloading more than 300-400 rounds a week, so I believe the Lee pro 1000 would be my best choice. Does anyone else agree?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
To help answer your questions, the powder is safe as long as it's away from open flame and so forth. I finally disposed of powder in cans that were my grandfathers from the late 60's or so, when it was sold in 8 oz metal cans. Your powder will never be out in the open, meaning that the lid will always be on, and if not in the original can, it will be in the power hopper. Just don't smoke when you are throwing charges. As far as other safety concerns go, I always wear eye protection when trimming brass or seating the bullets. When trimming brass, sometimes you'll get a tiny sliver of brass fly at you. One landed in my eye after blowing out the case. Oops. As long as you take your time, and really pay attention to what you're doing,and avoid distractions, it is safe and very rewarding.

As far as equipment goes, I don't have any Lee items, but for the price, they're not bad. I spent a little more money and went with RCBS and have been happy. Also, if Lee has a "kit" of the basic items, ie press, trimmer, powder scale, etc., that is the way to go as far as cost is concerned. I bought the RCBS Rock Chucker kit and saved a fair amount of money as oposed to buying each item sepearately. Ebay is also a really good place to get components such as dies and miscellaneous items at really good prices.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
Take a look at the turret press that Lee offers. It may be a little slower than the progressive, but does not have the problems with priming.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,607 Posts
The Rock Chucker is a great way to get started. I have had one for 25+ years. You can produce 100 rounds per hour at best. If you see yourself doing a lot of reloading get a Dillon 550. Don't waste your money on any other brand of progressive loader. I can get 500 rounds per hour with my 550.
Reloading is safe. I have loaded well over 500,000 rounds in my life time. One rule to remember, "If in doubt throw it out". If you even think a double charged round may have gotten in with the rest throw all of them out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
305 Posts
ccw:

Smokeless powder will not explode ever, but it is combustable. The gasoline you keep in the garage for the lawmower is both combustable and explosive, and therefore much more dangerous than smokeless gunpowder.

The reason people think it is explosive is because when fired out of a gun it makes a loud bang and propels a projectile at terrific speeds. The only way that it does this, is because it is CONFINED in a rifle or handgun chamber than can withstand pressure of up to 60,000 psi. The modern powder containers are made of cardboard or a plastic and if the powder is ignited the top will come off or the container split, and the powder will burn. Many years ago the NRA did experiments with taking cartridges and heating them until they went off. The projectile stayed put, and the case ruptured releasing the pressure.

The powder, if carelessly taken care can be a fire hazard, but remember it has to be started first, it will not start itself.

Before you start buying equipment buy a manual, with instructions in reloading. I like the Speer #13. This will give you the answers to most of your questions. I know nothing of the Lee presses, but you might want to consider the RCBS rockchucker. It is more expensive but worth it. Mine has been going strong for 30 years, and I think it will be working fine for my son's grandchildren. If you doubt it lift it, it is very strong. I have seen Lee's presses praised and cursed, go to a gun/reloading shop and compare presses, and make up your mind. But buy and read the manual first.

300 to 400 rounds per week is a lot of ammo. Unless you are in a pistol league and practice a lot, it is doubtful you will need this much consistantly over a year. If you get a progressive press, make sure it can handle any calibers you plan on loading for now and the future, some progressives don't like certain calibers. My Rockchucker can handle up to 200 rounds in a week, spreading the loading sessions over a week.

Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
404 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thank for the info. What everyone is saying seems to be what I was thinking.
It looks like the progressive press will be the way to go for me because I shoot a lot. When I say a lot I mean never under 200 rounds a week and normally closer to 300. I do want to start shooting competition also so I am sure this number will stay the same.
I have looked at the Dillon and know someone who has one and loves it.
I think I will take your advice dodgestdshift and pickup the Speer #13 manual.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,845 Posts
The Lee turret press is probably the best press from Lee. It's not suitable for use as advertised since the priming "system" is primitive at best, but if you use a 3 hole turret with sized and primed cases, then the speed is significantly better than just using a single stage press.

I could easily keep up with a 500 round a week habit, but a true non-Lee progressive would be even better.

I'd advise just getting a Dillon 550 to start with because you'll end up buying one anyway before long if your round count increases at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
300-400 rounds a week on a single stage?!!! I'm wore out thinking about it. I really like my Dillon 550, but there are other fine ones also ie RCBS and the Hornady LNL. If you're able, try to actually see the ones you're interested in, pull the handle, see how they work etc. Let us know on what you decide.
Bronson7
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
516 Posts
Like all the others said, gun powder is very safe if stored and handled correctly. Common sense helps to. Safe storage in the home goes a long way as well. I keep mine seperate from the loading bench in a closet on the highest shelf. I keep the primers on the shelf below it. I only have the powder container I am using to load with on my bench. NO chance of mixing powders when done that way.
This board is really Pro Dillon stuff. There is a reason for that....it works as advertised, well made and has a great resale value. If you are going to load over 1,000+ rounds a month. Look at a progressive press. Each time you pull the handle of a progressive press 4-6 operations occur (depending on the model of press). A single stage needs the handle pulled 4 times to make a round. Size-Bell-Seat-Crimp. You can combine Seat and Crimp in one die----but that is not the best for accuracy. You must also prime the case during this process.
For 1,000 pistol rounds a month the minimum type of press I would consider is a Turret and any progressive (Dillon or not) would be the better choice.
In one years time using your number of 350 rounds a week, you will reload 18,200 rounds of ammo. On a Dillon 550 you would pull the handle about 18,200 times. On a single stage press you need to pull the handle 72,800 times.... Makes my arm hurt just thinking about it...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,686 Posts
As a single-stage (turret) reloader, who shoots 200-300 rounds a MONTH, I also strongly suggest the Dillon 550 for anybody who shoots 2-3 hundred a WEEK.

What are you shooting now? Reloads or factory? Even if you're buying reloads, your Dillon 550 will pay for itself in less than a year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
404 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I am currently shooting UMC 45 at 9.95 a box and some 9mm Winchester 100 round white box at 10.95 a box. I mainly shoot 45 cal and it looks like I could save about half by reloading. I have been saving all of my brass because I knew I was going to start reloading :biglaugh: When I figured it up a month or so ago it would have taken the Dillon 9-10 months to pay for itself. However, I was including the case cleaner and the digital scales in that figure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
404 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
One more question. I know someone that has a Dillon Square Deal-B with the 45 dies for 200.00. His is in like new condition. It looks like it will only do pistol rounds, which would be fine for me. Is this a good price?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,911 Posts
IMO, it's just an OK price. $175 would be a good price.

Yes, the SDB only loads pistol calibers. And it uses Dillon proprietary dies. But, again IMO, you would be much happier with a SDB thank any of the Lee products you are considering.

Good shooting.

Rod.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
516 Posts
A new Square Deal costs $278 + shipping from Dillon. So you are looking a few bucks under $300 for new. Some of the internet guys offer it for 10% under list. Your buds press looks like a deal to me at $200. It will only use the Square Deal dies from Dillon and will not load rifle stuff.... Like the other guy said, the SD press is FAR better than any of the Lee stuff. I would buy it. If you don't like it after using it for awhile----you could make a profit off of it on E-Bay.... Go For It!! :) At $200 for the press with dies and ready to go-----it is the cost of 19 boxes of UMC (including tax).....Or in your case----one months cost of ammo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
404 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I just wanted to take a moment to thank everyone for their time and advice. I think I am just going to go with a Dillon 550b from the start. I told the wife if I am going to do it I want to do it right from the start. I went to a gun show yesterday to try and find the speer #13, but nobody had one, so will check out a couple of gun store this week. I also found this page on building a work bench that looks like it could easily be made into a reloading bench :) http://www.hammerzone.com/archives/workshop/bench/below20xl.html
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top