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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Where would be a good place to order emory cloth, and any other super fine polishing(with some grit) cloths. I have checked all the auto parts stores in my areas with no luck. I want to erase small idiot marks and shine up some of my stainless steel autos. Flitz seems to say that their cloths and waxes contain no abrasives at all.
 

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Flitz does a good job of polishing. Try hobby shops, and machine shop suppliers. Brownell's is a good source also, shop supplies are in the back of the catalog.
 

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Your local hardware store should carry Crocus cloth. My understanding is that it is fine red rouge polishing compound on paper. The color of the paper maybe brownish red. I am not sure what grit that would be the equivalent of. I think white polishing compound is the next finer.

I have taken Mothers mag polish and applied it to small strips of leather and used it to polish a surface. Works pretty well, but loads up quickly.


Tom
 

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I found emory cloth (up to 600 grit) at Home Depot in the paint department They also had lapping compound --Ryobi brand--in the hardware department. Several different flavors on the lapping/polishing compound depending on the material it was being used on.
 

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Hard to beat Simichrome; will polish plexiglas. Available @ bike shops and @ Brownell's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Appreciate the replies. Have some good tips to follow as always.
You fellers always come through, I'll start my hunt again tomorrow.
 

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Three common fine polishes:

1) Simichrome (mentioned)
2) Flitz Polish, not the other products
3) Mother's Mag and Aluminum Polish

All are very gentle polishes (meaning, very lightly abrasive). Good for use on SS but won't remove scratches - they are all too fine. From my experience, they all work about the same, so I use Mother's which is easier to find and considerably cheaper than the other two. If there's an auto shop in town, it probably has Mother's and possibly the other two, also.

Crocus cloths and lapping compound, as mentioned, are also great options - the crocus cloth and emery are good if you have some slightly deeper marks the fine polishes won't remove.
 

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Crazy, I know...

Actually toothpaste is a very low abrasive polishing compound. I have been surprised how effective it can be (no particular brand, but old white toothpaste is my preferred type).

Also, you can try jeweler's rouge, or auto glass polishing compound/paste.

With all efforts, start slow with very little pressure, and expect to take a little time for best results.

Take care, Steve
 

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Automotive wet-or-dry sandpaper is commonly available wherever you find automotive paint and bodywork supplies. Not all auto parts houses will be selling paint and bodywork supplies. Wet-or-dry sandpaper is available in grits up to 2000 or thereabouts.
 

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I have sandpaper at my shop starting at 150 grit all the way to 8,000 grit. My last sandpaper order was about $700 - no joke.

I'm having technical difficulties finding the website for the company I buy my fine paper from. If you call me this weekend, phone number is on my website. I know the name of the business is on the package I have some of the paper stored in.

Give me a call and I'll set you up with the contact info this weekend.
Bob
 

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What exactly do you need to do?Emery is rough and crocus is still course depending.I do body and paint and once the files and fine stones are done I grab 600 - 1200 auto wetodry 3M paper and use oil instead of water.It breaks down the paper quicker than water but you're working steel not paint so either way you're wiping out the grit quick.1500 feels like a piece of writing paper in an everyday notepad so unless you want to polish up the sides of a slide or frame forget the finer stuff untill you work out the flaws from 600 up and don't like the 1200 look.Then a hit with 1500 and a good polish with 2000 is where most people are happy but another good workout with 3000 (your fingers are courser after 2000 slid across them) is..... Now get some Flitz and buff her up and it will hurt your eyes to look at it,might even finda zit on your nose after you admire it .
 

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http://www.maasinc.com/

"Dear Ms. Maas;

Recently I had occasion to use one of your fine products, and I wish to inform you of the results. A few months ago I inherited a used Model 39 Smith and Wesson handgun, a fairly old model, in nickel finish. The gun was in fine working condition, but the finish was marred and scratched. I showed it to a firearms dealer and was told that there was nothing I could do to improve the gun’s appearance, aside from completely refinishing it, which would be quite expensive.

I then called Smith and Wesson, the manufacturer, and was told that refinishing was out of the questions, as the piece was too old and they would not accept liability in case of damage. The representative also told me that there was no product that would safely remove the scratches. After trying Brasso and another polish with no success, I was ready to just forget the whole matter. In short, the results were amazing. Virtually every scratch was removed and the gun now has a brilliant, clear shine-just perfect! I showed it to the dealer and he was quite surprised at how the finish was now flawless. He also informed me that the piece had now nearly doubled in value.

I am so pleased with your product that I now recommend it to my friends. It has many uses (my wife is now sprucing up her silverware), and the results are just great. It is worth the price many times over.

Ms. Maas, I do not know what special ingredients you use in your formula, but it certainly gets the job done. Congratulations and thank you!

Sincerely yours,

J. L. Evans"
 

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That's the place!! I just couldn't think of it...

Thanks for chiming in and helping me through my memory malfunction.

You can still call me if you want. I can spare a few pieces of paper if you like. I can cut a few strips of some high grit stuff into a few post card sizes and send you a few small samples to try. I'll put them in a mailing envelope and just mail it to you. If you like what you try, then you can call Rio Grande and order whatever you like.

Take care,
Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Once again, you fellows have come thru! Dr. Bob, that was very nice to offer your samples like that. Several of my gun buddies are also needing some assorted grits, and ddg4238 answered that query. We'll all get together and see what we need, and then order from Rio Grande. None of the auto parts stores, hardwares, or hobby shops had what we desired. So now we have a source. Bob, appreciate the offer much!!
 

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Once again, you fellows have come thru! Dr. Bob, that was very nice to offer your samples like that. Several of my gun buddies are also needing some assorted grits, and ddg4238 answered that query. We'll all get together and see what we need, and then order from Rio Grande. None of the auto parts stores, hardwares, or hobby shops had what we desired. So now we have a source. Bob, appreciate the offer much!!
Just let me know what grits you think you want to try and I'll send out a few samples to try.

The Auto Parts store and other places charge a couple or 3 dollars a sheet at times so buying from Rio Grande is going to save you a little money. They are also not very "spread out" on their availability as you are already aware of.

The higher grit stuff is in a micro fiber so it's a little different, but it's really neat stuff. I'll write down with ones are the pieces in correspondence with the grit size.

I'll hear from you this weekend? You have to call on the weekend because I only go home on Friday, Saturday and Sunday - the rest of the week I am out of town at school.

Take care,
Bob
 

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Lapping compound...

....Make sure to stay away from silicon carbide lapping compounds. It will embed in the metal and it keeps on cutting long after the initial lapping procedure. The silicon carbide types are usually sold in auto supply or machine supply warehouses. Look for non-embedding compounds like garnet...
Barry
 
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