1911Forum banner

81 - 100 of 303 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #81 ·
Bullhunter-amazing work..Greg, we have tons of stainless parts..

http://shopwilsoncombat.com/Bullet-Proof-Parts/products/223/

Everything but a stainless sear and disconnect..we even have stainless extractors and firing pins..if you search for struts on the site we also have a stainless billet strut.
Thanks again, I still need to call in for the ejector and maybe a few more parts.

I am trying to think why you might need it but maybe clearance for an integral or already installed plunger tube? All you need to do could probably be done without flipping the frame but just something to think about.
For most operations, the plunger tube could be installed out. One operation I can think of where the plunger tube would need to be installed toward the fixture would be to machine countersink the slide stop hole for a recessed pin. Then there are other custom jobs where being able fixture the frame that way would be handy, like engraving and repairing holes, etc..

I am interested in how you plan to drill and pin the extractor (Wilson Rep, are you listening?).

I see their frames come shaped for their proprietary extractor, but without pin holes (as far as I can tell). Does your jig allow for this? What are the specs for the hole placement?

Wilson Rep, are your frames sold with your extractor installed as an option? (or standard is a plus).

The frame is beautiful so far and my next gun will be a home-build. I have the know-how, but none of this fancy equipment.

Once again, Kudos on a great thread!!
Thanks for the compliment. To put a nice pistol together without a mill and lathe is possible if you buy parts that don't need machine work, which is relatively easy if you are going with the .45 acp. If you buy parts that are fully machined how you want them, you can concentrate on the hand fitting and finishing aspects with cheaper and simpler hand tools.

I haven't given drilling the ejector any thought, as it is not much of a challenge for me given my experience and the tools I have on hand. Earlier in my life, I'm sure I could have messed it up with the best of them. The fixture I built and the refined versions I now plan to manufacture would not be of any help specific to drilling the ejector, other than the fact the frame can be mounted and laid flat. With a mill and the right cutter and technique, the frame could be used as a jig to located and make the hole through the ejector. It's a less demanding job than the standard 2 legged ejector situation where the cut is off center on the round leg.

A little information just for fun, a fixture locates and secures a part or material. A jig often is a fixture too, in that it locates and holds the part, but it also is built to locate and or guide the tool or tools.


Bull, for the ignorami among us (me) you are going to have to explain what you meant by "as good as I could get it" on the probe readings. The readings are identical across the board, so what would you like to have seen different?

That looks great btw.
That was just my dry sense of humor when I said that. If wasn't going to take a photo of that screen for the whole world to see, I might have settled for a tenth or two difference. I got lucky on the first setup and it was close at 2-3 thousands, and only it took a few (4 or 5 maybe) more adjustments to get it at "zero" according to the probe.


BullHunter, I noticed the DMI logo in many of your pics. I believe I have one of your arrow rests.

Really enjoying this thread and look forward to seeing the finished product.
I wondered if someone would see that and put two and two together. Thanks, I'm glad your enjoying the thread! It makes it more worthwhile, as it takes time to do take the photos, upload them and try (I'm not a natural story teller like some are) to make a story out of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,968 Posts
Bullhunter;
I must say, as a life long precision geek, it is most refreshing to read and see your posts. The pistolsmithing profession has been slow, in my opinion, to embrace the benefits of precision machining. The benchrest crowd has been light years ahead of us for a long time..
I have zero back ground in CNC and not capable of reading or writting the first factor in G-code..and it's too late for me to start now...I enjoy reading about it..and seeing your photos.
I expect to see great things from you in the future..:):)
Jerry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #83 ·
Bullhunter;
I must say, as a life long precision geek, it is most refreshing to read and see your posts. The pistolsmithing profession has been slow, in my opinion, to embrace the benefits of precision machining. The benchrest crowd has been light years ahead of us for a long time..
I have zero back ground in CNC and not capable of reading or writting the first factor in G-code..and it's too late for me to start now...I enjoy reading about it..and seeing your photos.
I expect to see great things from you in the future..:):)
Jerry
Jerry, thanks for commenting, from what I read you are a very talented and respected gunsmith, so when guys like you and some of the other skilled craftsmen of the industry have commented favorably it makes this seem worthwhile. I have taken notice of your postings and photos, and admire your tools and abilities too. CNC's are a great tool in my opinion, for some operations especially so. But, they can not totally replace a skilled craftsman, of which there are fewer and fewer it seems as time passes. I think a lot of pistolsmiths and the people who covet their works appreciate the finer handwork, as do I. My personal thoughts are to use CNC machine for what they do best, and compliment that with handwork when it is best, as to me it is the final results that matter.

I am not the best teacher, but I could have you writing basic G code in less than an hour. When I first started it was overwhelming, but I caught on without a teacher, I had no internet then and was one of the very first to have a CNC in western Montana.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
Great thread.... I'll be glued to this one for some time...

This was as good as I could get it,
Oh paleeeeeeaze :) ... couldn't spare a tenth for the camera, eh?

The finish on your mills cuts is amazing....

mind sharing what CAM suite you generate your code in?

truely inspiring work.... thankyou for sharing it with us
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #87 ·
Great thread.... I'll be glued to this one for some time...



Oh paleeeeeeaze :) ... couldn't spare a tenth for the camera, eh?

The finish on your mills cuts is amazing....

mind sharing what CAM suite you generate your code in?

truely inspiring work.... thankyou for sharing it with us
If it will make you happy, next time I'll let a tenth slip by. :) Actually, the numbers the probe writes to the offset registry can be manually overwritten, so it would be easy to fake it.:biglaugh:

I don't know what alloy the frame is, but it does machine well. Since the alloy was unknown to me I was conservative. Sometimes with just a few or a single part slower is faster. Took 3 passes down the center with a 4 flute .3125 end mill at about .1" depth, 1850 rpm and 8 ipm, then cleaned up the sides and bottom with finish passes.

My CAD/CAM currently is One CNC XR4, for a few simple cuts like the ramp channel and VIS finger CAM works fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,351 Posts
When I was a lad there were always kids that had neat stuff and we all liked to go to ****'s house to play. I have to say that after reading posts by several members here ( Logman, Jerry K, Chuck Rogers, ...et al. so as to save time typing, not to slight anyone...) I'd love to come and play at your all's house! :rock: :biglaugh:
Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #89 ·
When I was a lad there were always kids that had neat stuff and we all liked to go to ****'s house to play. I have to say that after reading posts by several members here ( Logman, Jerry K, Chuck Rogers, ...et al. so as to save time typing, not to slight anyone...) I'd love to come and play at your all's house! :rock: :biglaugh:
Joe
We are less than 3,000 miles away, swing by when you get a free afternoon. :)

I used CAD software to draw this trigger up, it's a simple part but now that I have in on file it is easy to modify and do new designs. I have some other ideas I will make models of. I'll order a couple of tools I need for these and make a few to try. I might have to make dies to build trigger bows, and some tooling to join the parts.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,351 Posts
Cool look to the trigger. Don't forget us guys with short fingers.:biglaugh::biglaugh:
Brownells sells a trigger bow mandrel that is pretty substantial. Also with several threads mentioning over long bows, QC on the finished bow is seemingly important. At least the mandrel will give you a jumping off point.
Any more thought on fabbing up the stainless hammers?
Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,018 Posts
WOW are you going to keep this as a hobby or is there a Bullhunter Customs in the future. Bullhunter Customs I like the sound of that:).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #92 ·
Cool look to the trigger. Don't forget us guys with short fingers.:biglaugh::biglaugh:
Brownells sells a trigger bow mandrel that is pretty substantial. Also with several threads mentioning over long bows, QC on the finished bow is seemingly important. At least the mandrel will give you a jumping off point.
Any more thought on fabbing up the stainless hammers?
Joe
Joe, the trigger shoes are a simple part and so I have been thinking there is no reason why I couldn't manufacture several lengths, shapes, and styles of triggers to supplement what is out there now. I would need production quality dies for trigger bows though, and I'm not sure that a tool from Brownell's will fill the bill, but perhaps I'm wrong. I did look for it, but so far I haven't found the magic search words to be successful, will try again latter.

I haven't forgotten the hammers.

WOW are you going to keep this as a hobby or is there a Bullhunter Customs in the future. Bullhunter Customs I like the sound of that:).
Right now I am exploring options, but I believe the possibility of being involved in the business in some way or another is there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,378 Posts
If it will make you happy, next time I'll let a tenth slip by. :) Actually, the numbers the probe writes to the offset registry can be manually overwritten, so it would be easy to fake it.:biglaugh:

I don't know what alloy the frame is, but it does machine well. Since the alloy was unknown to me I was conservative. Sometimes with just a few or a single part slower is faster. Took 3 passes down the center with a 4 flute .3125 end mill at about .1" depth, 1850 rpm and 8 ipm, then cleaned up the sides and bottom with finish passes.

My CAD/CAM currently is One CNC XR4, for a few simple cuts like the ramp channel and VIS finger CAM works fine.
Stainless Frame 400 Series forging 26-30 RC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Great Build going on! Just curious about your fixture a little bit. Any reason you made it out of aluminum instead of steel besides the obvious weight differences? Also what aluminum is the fixture 7075,2024? I'm a machinist a nerd for this kinda stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,351 Posts
I can see the stamping or laser cutting, or even water jetting would be the first step. The rest is magic to me. I would like to see an episode of "How It's Made" devoted to 1911 triggers! Is the die not precise enough to use for QC at least?
Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,656 Posts
Is the die not precise enough to use for QC at least?
Joe
The Brownells die is tapered so it can be used to straighten the trigger bow regardless of its length. That same feature prohibits its use as a "go" or "no go" gauge unless you were to mark some horizontal lines showing how far down onto the die a properly sized trigger bow would go.



Triggers are one of the least expensive parts to buy and a fairly complicated part to make. I'll continue to buy mine ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
This is an awesome build. Not only for the 1911 content, but the precision machining content as well.
In for more. I have 2 stainless frames on their way to me from Caspian/Foster right now.

Thanks.
 
81 - 100 of 303 Posts
Top