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Discussion Starter #1
Hey folks,

Recently purchased NIB Springfield GI SS. Love the feel and look of this gun and can not wait to take it out on a date to the range. I have a question: for first cleaning, would you recommend full disassembly or just the slide, barrel, etc.

Also, from what I have read most folks clean their 1911s after a trip to the range (I do this with all my striker fired pistols and revolvers) but do not do full disassembly. Full disassembly after few hundred/thousand rounds.

Your advice on that will be greatly appreciate it.
 

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Personally, I would take her most of the way down, just to get rid of any heavy oil/grease that SA may have used as a preservative. Then I would Militec it and go shoot. Just be sure to oil it very well for the few hundred rounds and you should be ok. Oh and yes I usually clean after a range run, unless I know that I will be back the next day or so. Congradulations to your new found illness.
 

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Field stripping is all that's necessary for cleaning and normal use.

A complete disassembly is only required to replace broken or worn parts,
or if the weapon were dropped in mud, water or similiar substance that
would invade the internal workings.

However, since the 1911 is so easy to completely dis-mantle, a lot of
people do it after about 1000rds or maybe once or twice a year.

It's not necessary but it's fun to do and you learn how everything works
and may get a heads up on a failing part.

But remember, more guns are damaged/worn by excessive and improper
disassembly than will ever be by firing.
 

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For a new 1911 I will only field strip after 200 rounds, and then after 600 rounds. After that a detail strip is in order. Detail strips after that come once a year.
 

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Unless it looked like it was gummed up with old lubricant, I would just take it out to see how it runs. Afterwards I would field strip it, clean and lube. I wouldn't be in a hurry to tear it down. Just shoot and enjoy!
 

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I would detail strip the slide, just because it's easy to do. A flush with brake parts cleaner then some Break-Free will do. As far as the frame, I wouldn't completely disassemble unless you've done it before and know how. I'd remove the grips, give it a good BPC flush, a lube and go shoot it..
 

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Cam 03 With the new CNC tight tolerance's, and S/S subject to Gailing,their has been a move to LUBE THE FIREARM. I mean till it is dripping down the slide on the first 50+ rds. This helps take all S/S Micro pcs/chips out of action. Put the lube to it. I did it to my Springfield Loaded S/S Champion and it cycles like a sewing machine. Try keeping lube away from grips. It will be dirty, crappie looking, but the end result is great.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you all for your help. It is greatly appreciated!

AZ Husker, thanks for posting the videos. Very helpful!
 

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Always standing by to help! You're welcome.
 

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Probably not necessary but I usually will detail strip if I am not too anxious to shoot the new gun and have the time, but will first chance I get.
 

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Field strip is a must because it's not ready for shooting. They prepared it for shipping and gun storage!

Detail strip is fine too, if you know how. I always go the detail route, as I like checking out the WHOLE gun.

Enjoy shooting your new pistol!:rock:
 

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I've done it both ways with success. But always done a detail disassembly, clean, and lube after the first 100 or so rounds. The first range session is really just to see if it works and how close the sights are.

You cannot overlubricate a M1911. Glug on the CLP and wipe off that oozing out with a rag for the first couple of boxes of ammo.

Detail strip and complete removal of any and all lubricant and preservative follows my first range session. I only use CLP. FP10 is a good choice. Militec 1 is merely a lube. Lubes well though.

Do not use Simple Green. Carb cleaner works well.

If you didn't replace the full length recoil guide with standard parts before test firing, now is the time to do it.

-- Chuck
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thank you all for your advice. At this point, the GI is field stripped (just did it). It was pretty straightforward.

When I took it apart, though, I noticed the unmistakable sign of the GI being fired. Does SA test fire their weapons and then ship them like that to the dealers? It is either that or this might have been a returned GI? I bought it from Budsgunshop which has quite a reputation. Besides the black fouling (not much but there) inside the barrel, the slide, and the rails, the gun has no other signs of being used. It really came new in a box, with the SA tag around the trigger, manuals, holster and mag holders, the whole shebang!

Any thoughts on that, folks?
 

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Detail strip, lube, shoot.

Firearms are not lubricated prior to shipping. They are preserved, different kind of petroleum product. Grease, yes. Lube, no.

Detail strip it, clean and properly lube it. For the next year or so, field stripping should be the only requirement. I deatail strip once a year, maybe six months if it's been an exceptionally high round count.
 

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New guns

Guns are "proofed" before they leave the factory. They get shipped with anti-rust material and there is minor fouling from the proofing process. You DO NOT have to detail strip your gun anytime soon. At the very minimum would be at the 1,000 round mark. Fied stripping a 1911 that has not been broken in thoroughly is asking for trouble unless you are experienced and have a lot of patience. I would gather that a lot of finishes are marred by "gotta detail strip this thing" people who did not even have the right tools (brass punches) for the job in the first place. FP-10 is a good lubricant and can be applied to all the right places without detail stripping a 1911.
 
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