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Discussion Starter #1
I shot my new NRM 1991 from rest yesterday - it prints about 4"-5" high. That seems a bit much. Is this typical?

It only has about 200 rounds through it - should I wait awhile and break it in some more or send it back?

How is Colt's customer service?
 

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Sounds like you need to shoot even farther out. I know a guy with the new gun, does'nt want to hear that. But hey, you shoot it enough, you wont use the sites anyway...
 

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DamnedDirtyApe

I agree with Kahn, shoot your pistol some more. The point of impact should be a little high at 25 yds, assuming that you placed the top of the front sight in the center of your target. 1911 sights are regulated so the point of aim will be the point of impact at 50 yds. So this means that the point of impact will be a few, usually 3 inches, high at 25 yds due to the arc the bullet flies to the target. When shooting at 25 yds, for best results place the black part of the target on top of the front sight; Bullseye target shooters call this floating the ball. When you have fired more rounds, and the barrel and slide seat in to each other, the point of impact may come down a little. Once you have fired around 1,000 rounds if the point of impact is still off, taking the arc into account, then give Colt Customer Service a call.
 

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Str8_Shot,
I had recently posted that my stainless 1991A1 shoots ~3" high at 15 and 25 yds, and that as long as I use a classic 6 o'clock hold (as you pointed out) that I'm okay. So from what you are saying my Colt's sights are properly regulated, but this doesn't really make sense to me (15yds seems more practical). Has Colt always sighted in their 1911s at 50yds? Where can I read about this (a Field or Tech. Manual, I presume)? And what is there rationale for this?
 

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RGL01

The rational is the pistol was designed to be used in combat, and the shooter needs to be able to effectively hit his opponent as far away as possible. When the 1911 was developed, handguns were considered a necessary tool and the ranges that were common for using a handgun from the Civil War through the Morro Uprising in the late 1800s was 50 yds and farther. I expect that when the Army was developing the criteria for the then new sidearm an effective range had to be determined, so the Army or Colt/JMBrowning decided on 50 yds. Later, this standard carried over into Bullseye Target shooting and all manufacturers continued to use this as the basis for sights. Now it is just the way it has always been done.
 

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ROKLOK

If both of your pistols are worn in (at least 1000 rnds each), adjust your sight picture as noted above, and try different brands of ammo. Different brands of ammo will fly to different points of impact due to slight variations in each manufacturers pressure loadings.

Str8_Shot
 

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Str8_Shot,
Thanks for the information. That's quite an education. I hadn't known this in the four years that I've owned my Colt. ;)
 

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Colt XS

I owned a Colt XS LW Commander that I bought new from a local dealer (big one). At 25 yards, it also shot pretty high(6" or more?). At my local range, we have Bianchi plates at 25 yards. I had to have the gun at a 6 o'clock (actually lower) hold to hit the targets.

I think that Colt sights the guns in high since I have a Colt SAA that shoots high at 25 yards (I also use a 6 o'clock hold). To me that was weird because most SAA guns come with a tall front sight so the gun will intentionally shoot low (and you file down the sight to adjust the gun's point of impact to your load).
'
Every Colt that I've owned (4 of them, 3 purchased new, one used) seem to shoot high for me at 25 yards. I think the factory must sight them in that way.

I have a Kimber, and I used to own a Springfield Armory 1911 and both of those guns shoot/shot point of aim for me at 25 yards.
 

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One other thing...

If you want to modify your point of impact, try using different weight bullets.

A heavier bullet (230gr) tends to shoot higher than a lighter bullet (185gr).

You might try some factory loads that have lighter bullets and see if you can move the point of impact down.

for instance, in my colt SAA if I use standard 250 or 255 gr Colt rounds, the gun shoots high at 25yards. If I use 225 grain rounds, the point of impact moves down at the same distance.
 

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A strange nuance of Colt guns. My Glock 21 in pretty much POA/POI at 15 & 25 yds.
As far as loads, they're "non-negotiable". 230gr hardball or Hydra-Shok is all I'll shoot in my 45s.
 

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My NRM Commander shoots 2-3 inches high at 10 yards with S&B 230 gr. ball. I switched to Win. white box 230 gr. Now it shoots to POA. This is with a six o'clock hold. Before you do anything to the gun or sights, I'd try different brands of ammo. Just my $ 0.02.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you for the replies and good info, everyone. I shot the Gov some more today, and realized I had gotten very used to the 6-o'clock hold....it seems to be more natural than my SA Mil-Spec's 12-o'clock hold.

I've got a Gold Cup on layaway now - posted about this on another thread on this forum-and I can't wait to try out the Bomar adjustable sights.
 

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DamnedDirtyApe,

Are your groups tight? The reason I asked is that I just bought a new Colt Combat Commander. I want it to shoot to POA at 10 yrds.
 
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