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Discussion Starter #1
I was on the phone with my brother last night who when I told him I was picking up my new pistol tomorrow asked how I would "break it in" Now I've heard about running a few hundered rounds through it when it's new, but to me that's more just getting used to the pistol.

However he said he had read for the first 5 shots to clean the bbl after EVER shot. Then clean the BBL every 5 shots until after the first 50. Anyone ever hear of this? He mentioned doing this on his hunting rifle, and I'm wondering if this isn't more of a rifle thing?

Anyone? CD? What's the "right" thing to do?

Thanks in advance for answering the "newbie" question.
 

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200 rounds of FMJ would do fine. Haven't heard of anyone cleaning after every 5 rounds. Just make sure your new CD has enough or not too much lube.

When I picked up my CD and being new to handgun I didn't inspect the gun and just fired away. And worse, I used lead bullets.

Hope this help.

vega
 

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There's nothing wrong with using lead bullets with a new gun.

The break-in routine mentioned is basically only used by shooters with match guns and very expensive barrels. These are all rifle shooters. I've never seen it make a difference on a regular production barrel(many will argue with me) and have my doubts about match barrels (still do it anyway).

If a pistol needs breaking in, then something is wrong with it. I'm going to avoid my usual tirade about the trend toward bullseye tight guns being produced/stocked/purchased as defensive weapons, just so I won't get upset again.

I fire at least 500 rounds through any new handgun, not to break it in, but to test the functioning. If it fails and the failures can't be traced back to a faulty magazine, then that gun goes back to whoever made it or it gets traded off to someone I don't like. This is assuming the gun was properly cleaned and lubed before firing it.

I know I've picked up many giveaway priced surplus rifles from owners who didn't have enough sense to clean the cosmoline out of the working parts and figured they'd just wipe most of it off of the outside and be set.

My understanding is most guns are shipped with a coating of oil(or whatever) that's intended to prevent rust, not to act as a lubricant when shooting. Brand new(and used) guns should always be thoroughly cleaned and lubed before firing them.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Originally posted by Walking Point:
If a pistol needs breaking in, then something is wrong with it. I'm going to avoid my usual tirade about the trend toward bullseye tight guns being produced/stocked/purchased as defensive weapons, just so I won't get upset again.
That is what I was thinking, but wasn't sure if I was correct in that assumption. I've read a LOT about the difference between the "bullseye" tight guns vs. defensive weapons and can clearly see the point. It just makes sense.


I fire at least 500 rounds through any new handgun, not to break it in, but to test the functioning. If it fails and the failures can't be traced back to a faulty magazine, then that gun goes back to whoever made it or it gets traded off to someone I don't like. This is assuming the gun was properly cleaned and lubed before firing it.
This makes sense also. I guess my real reason for running the ammo through my new guns was to make sure they would function. I guess I just thought that's what "breaking a gun in" meant. I also think that if a manufacturer supplies magazines with the pistol, that pistol should work with those magazines. If it doesn't, they fix either problem, the magazines or the gun. Maybe I'm just picky.
 

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Originally posted by jrf:
However he said he had read for the first 5 shots to clean the bbl after EVER shot. Then clean the BBL every 5 shots until after the first 50. Anyone ever hear of this? He mentioned doing this on his hunting rifle, and I'm wondering if this isn't more of a rifle thing?

Anyone? CD? What's the "right" thing to do?

Thanks in advance for answering the "newbie" question.
I remember running across an FAQ which mentioned the same thing about cleaning the bore after a few rounds but I'm pretty sure it pertained to newly purchased rifles. I also remember the author stressing the point that it wouldn't matter much to defensive handguns that wouldn't be used to shoot in the same distances that rifles are meant to.

I don't really know what is the "right" thing to do, but I was lead to believe that when "breaking in" your pistol you should generally use factory FMJ which are known to be more reliable than lead reloads. In this way, when something goes wrong, you've eliminated at least one potential problem factor. It'll then make it easier for you to figure out if your pistol is at fault or whether it was the mags etc., etc..

Hope this helps.
 

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Walking Point----what is the best way (and where) to lube the 1911? the 'users manual' sure doesn't tell much--the book with my S&W Sigma was much better for instructions but I guess these are printed overseas where English is a 'second language'--appreciate any tips
 
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