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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Back in June, I spied a brand new Colt Gold Cup at a LGS and, since I'd wanted one for years, I snagged it. The price was MSRP minus a discount for being a veteran. When I got it home and field stripped it; after a proper lube job, I started the reassembly process. When it came time to reinsert the slide stop, I couldn't get it to seat. In my efforts, I managed to scratch it ever so slightly. Mad at myself, I reasoned that, since I didn't like the finish anyway, I'd just get it reblued. After a bit of research, I found a gentleman about an hour from me and took it to him. It was inspected carefully and, after I showed him the scratch, he said, "That's nothing but, I'm with you. The finish is not too good." The price was set and he said, "I'll call you in three months or so."

Unfired & slightly scratched, it looked like this:
Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory

On every roll-mark, you could feel raised metal. That surprised the 'smith that Colt didn't do a bit more surface prep. He said he'd fix that without marring the depth of the roll-marks. He called the other day and said it was ready. Here are the results of his efforts:
Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Gun accessory Rectangle

The raised metal around the the roll marks is gone and the finish is now similar to Colt's Royal Blue. He did a fine job.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
At some point most of us cause a "stupid scratch." If you field-strip and then reassemble your 1911s enough, you'll probably get one. Saying that, the internet warriors will chime in and say that only an idiot causes a stupid scratch and that they've never, and will never cause one. Well, bully for them. If you've got a tight and strong plunger tube protrusion, it's tough not to cause a small one. Don't beat yourself up if you do it again. Just be as careful as you can.
When I told a good friend what I'd done, he said, "You idiot." He bought my lunch, though, so we're good!

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Flat surface polishing like that took at least an hour. So add what you paid to have it polished and blued to the MSRP to see what it MSRP would be with that finish from the factory.
Well, I went to their Custom Shop options and saw this:

Royal blue - $675.00
National Match blue - $525.00
Standard blue - $425.00

I suspect my Gold Cup had the standard finish. If I use the price I paid for the pistol and added the standard finish, the Custom Shop 1911 would be right much more that what I have in it.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
First I want say that is a beautiful roll mark fix and blue job, nowadays a disappearing art. I would recommend a minor modification to the slide stop to make it one go in a bit easier as well as make it less like to slip an cause a scratch. Just a bit of file and stone work. I don’t like reposting people’s pictures so I will link to a post. If you want I can take a picture of my Heinie 1911 where this was done. Best wishes and would love to know how she shoots for you.
Many thanks for that information. I've got a three or four slide stops in the parts bin and a set of new needle files. I'll give it a try.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
I've posted this before, but here is the info again... There is a company that makes a small, thin piece of plastic that sits over the frame that prevents idiot scratches. The site is "idiotscratch.com" and the device is very inexpensive. As someone said earlier, if you strip and clean your 1911s often enough you are bound to scratch one or two guns.

This device does work, so take a look at the site. Good luck...
Thank you for helping me help myself! I tried going to their site but, apparently, I can't get there from here. I'll try later.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Gotta tell you gentlemen, I went to the range yesterday and fired just over 200 rounds through the Gold Cup. I adjusted the factory-set sight three clicks to the right and chewed up the bull's eye at 15 yards. I used a mix of range ammo trying to find out what it liked as I had heard/read that Gold Cups could be finicky. It chewed up everything I fed it. Not one hiccup! When I got home, I cleaned 'er up and properly lubed/greased it. When it came time to position the slide stop for installation, I was able to snap it into place. No muss, no fuss. It just needed a little breaking in. Just goes to show that all of my luck isn't bad!

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Just wait 'til you scratch it again... ;)

Okay that was mean. :sneaky: Seriously, it looks great and you're quite fortunate to still have an actual gunsmith near you who can do a great job refinishing firearms. Most gunsmiths nowadays won't even handle a refinish job unless it's a basic beadblast of stainless or a shake n' bake coating. And that's the ones aren't simply idiots who only know how to snap together a Glock or AR.
Yes, that was mean but apropos!:) I do stuff like that, as you know!

You're correct about the competent 'smiths these days. My initial visit to the gunsmith just prior to getting that Gold Cup refinished, I was concerned about the surface preparation "eating" into the roll marks too deeply. The 'smith said, "Don't be concerned. We can fix that." We have a few "shake 'n bake" guys around here, too. One worked for 22 years in the Marine Corps and was an armorer after his infantry days were over. He saw my Gold Cup and asked if I'd introduce him to the 'smith. I made the appropriate call and got 'em together yesterday. By the way, that old-but younger-than-me gunny told me on the ride yesterday that he rarely talked to Army pukes but, since I'd served in combat, he'd make an exception. He went on to say he wouldn't loan me money, though. Gun shop humor.

Mike
 
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