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Nice.
Bluing used to be a staple of virtually every gunsmith, but now it's rare to find someone who can do it without making things worse.
I took a gun to a local shop, with the surface finish I wanted, already, and the guy not only rust blued it, killing the polish I'd applied, but took "rust" too seriously, and left pitting all over it.
 
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First I want say that is a beautiful roll mark fix and blue job, nowadays a disappearing art. I would recommend a minor modification to the slide stop to make it one go in a bit easier as well as make it less like to slip an cause a scratch. Just a bit of file and stone work. I don’t like reposting people’s pictures so I will link to a post. If you want I can take a picture of my Heinie 1911 where this was done. Best wishes and would love to know how she shoots for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
First I want say that is a beautiful roll mark fix and blue job, nowadays a disappearing art. I would recommend a minor modification to the slide stop to make it one go in a bit easier as well as make it less like to slip an cause a scratch. Just a bit of file and stone work. I don’t like reposting people’s pictures so I will link to a post. If you want I can take a picture of my Heinie 1911 where this was done. Best wishes and would love to know how she shoots for you.
Many thanks for that information. I've got a three or four slide stops in the parts bin and a set of new needle files. I'll give it a try.

Mike
 

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Nice.
Bluing used to be a staple of virtually every gunsmith, but now it's rare to find someone who can do it without making things worse.
I took a gun to a local shop, with the surface finish I wanted, already, and the guy not only rust blued it, killing the polish I'd applied, but took "rust" too seriously, and left pitting all over it.
Up till a few years ago, there was a small local shop with a blue tank. I'd do my own polishing or glass-beading and let them tank it. They charge me like $40. Soon after I started dealing with them , they asked me to show them how I did slides. Told them ya need a FLAT surface, I use a granite surface plate. Depending on what the surface looks like, I'll start with anywhere between 600 and 1000 grit silicon carbide wet/dry paper backed by the cardboard back from a legal pad. Then 1200, 1500, 2000. Wet the paper with oil. Then I use an old piece of thick hard leather to back a piece of canvas or denim with progressively finer polish. I use a straight piece of wood as a guide. NO BUFFING WHEELS!!!!!! You can get a nice flat mirror finish with no waves. They showed me a slide they tried to clean up on a surface grinder, dry! :whistle: I coulda told them it was gonna warp like ****!

I did know a guy that did outstanding slow-rust bluing. But he's passed on.
 

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I've posted this before, but here is the info again... There is a company that makes a small, thin piece of plastic that sits over the frame that prevents idiot scratches. The site is "idiotscratch.com" and the device is very inexpensive. As someone said earlier, if you strip and clean your 1911s often enough you are bound to scratch one or two guns.

This device does work, so take a look at the site. Good luck...
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
I've posted this before, but here is the info again... There is a company that makes a small, thin piece of plastic that sits over the frame that prevents idiot scratches. The site is "idiotscratch.com" and the device is very inexpensive. As someone said earlier, if you strip and clean your 1911s often enough you are bound to scratch one or two guns.

This device does work, so take a look at the site. Good luck...
Thank you for helping me help myself! I tried going to their site but, apparently, I can't get there from here. I'll try later.

Mike
 

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At some point most of us cause a "stupid scratch." If you field-strip and then reassemble your 1911s enough, you'll probably get one. Saying that, the internet warriors will chime in and say that only an idiot causes a stupid scratch and that they've never, and will never cause one. Well, bully for them. If you've got a tight and strong plunger tube protrusion, it's tough not to cause a small one. Don't beat yourself up if you do it again. Just be as careful as you can.
I've done it more than once. I've found that blued pistols scratch much more easily than parkerized finished pistols.
 
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Back in June, I spied a brand new Colt Gold Cup at a LGS and, since I'd wanted one for years, I snagged it. The price was MSRP minus a discount for being a veteran. When I got it home and field stripped it; after a proper lube job, I started the reassembly process. When it came time to reinsert the slide stop, I couldn't get it to seat. In my efforts, I managed to scratch it ever so slightly. Mad at myself, I reasoned that, since I didn't like the finish anyway, I'd just get it reblued. After a bit of research, I found a gentleman about an hour from me and took it to him. It was inspected carefully and, after I showed him the scratch, he said, "That's nothing but, I'm with you. The finish is not too good." The price was set and he said, "I'll call you in three months or so."

Unfired & slightly scratched, it looked like this:
View attachment 651254
On every roll-mark, you could feel raised metal. That surprised the 'smith that Colt didn't do a bit more surface prep. He said he'd fix that without marring the depth of the roll-marks. He called the other day and said it was ready. Here are the results of his efforts:
View attachment 651255
The raised metal around the the roll marks is gone and the finish is now similar to Colt's Royal Blue. He did a fine job.

Mike
Very nice. Even with the less than optimal original finish.
Colt sure has disappointed me a bit in the last 10 years. My 12 year old Series 70 (not GC or NM) is Very nicely finished, I don't know what they're doing nowadays...
 
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I regrettably traded off a 70’s Colt GC and to me that finish was flawless.
I ended up purchasing another one over 2yrs ago and the finish was just like yours. I was disappointed as it was nothing like my previous one.

I thought the Gold Cups were Colts flagship 1911’s as the Pythons are to their revolver line.

Your refinish looks great! I may follow suit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Gotta tell you gentlemen, I went to the range yesterday and fired just over 200 rounds through the Gold Cup. I adjusted the factory-set sight three clicks to the right and chewed up the bull's eye at 15 yards. I used a mix of range ammo trying to find out what it liked as I had heard/read that Gold Cups could be finicky. It chewed up everything I fed it. Not one hiccup! When I got home, I cleaned 'er up and properly lubed/greased it. When it came time to position the slide stop for installation, I was able to snap it into place. No muss, no fuss. It just needed a little breaking in. Just goes to show that all of my luck isn't bad!

Mike
 

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Back in June, I spied a brand new Colt Gold Cup at a LGS and, since I'd wanted one for years, I snagged it. The price was MSRP minus a discount for being a veteran. When I got it home and field stripped it; after a proper lube job, I started the reassembly process. When it came time to reinsert the slide stop, I couldn't get it to seat. In my efforts, I managed to scratch it ever so slightly. Mad at myself, I reasoned that, since I didn't like the finish anyway, I'd just get it reblued. After a bit of research, I found a gentleman about an hour from me and took it to him. It was inspected carefully and, after I showed him the scratch, he said, "That's nothing but, I'm with you. The finish is not too good." The price was set and he said, "I'll call you in three months or so."

Unfired & slightly scratched, it looked like this:
View attachment 651254
On every roll-mark, you could feel raised metal. That surprised the 'smith that Colt didn't do a bit more surface prep. He said he'd fix that without marring the depth of the roll-marks. He called the other day and said it was ready. Here are the results of his efforts:
View attachment 651255
The raised metal around the the roll marks is gone and the finish is now similar to Colt's Royal Blue. He did a fine job.

Mike
Great Job! Who was the Vendor if I may ask.
 
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