1911Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My dad, brother, and I just started shooting again and after reloading about 1000 rounds with my dad’s old RCBS single stage press we decided to upgrade. :) We got our Dillon XL 650, absolutely awesome. Only took about 2 hours to set up and we were off to the races. Our only problem is we are able to reload faster than we can clean brass. We chose to pass on the case feeder partially do to price but on the same note we like having to touch all the brass so be sure it's still in good shape before going into the press.

Just needed to share my excitment with everyone.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,459 Posts
Congrats!







P.S.-----your powder is low. ;) Tracy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,937 Posts
Your obsession with fondling brass will quickly dissipate, if you'll pony up the $$ for that casefeeder. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,613 Posts
I have the case feeder, but still inspect every case before they get dumped into it. Unless you've got an assistant to keep the case tube filled while you crank out the rounds, you really need the case feeder to get the most out of your 650.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,955 Posts
Congratulations, nice picture of the "Gipper" by the way.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
After reoloading a few hundred rounds there is powder all over the turn table and in the unused primer catch tray. Is this normal or is there something wrong?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,907 Posts
Powder on the shell plate usually means you had a round that didn't get a primer. Sometimes the primer bar will not engage properly and you will not seat a primer and then the powder gets dumped the on machine as it makes its way around the next station. Check all your rounds.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have, i did have one bad case that the price didn't seat but there was still some powder on the machine before that. I'll have to clean just pay close attention to see if I can spot the problem.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,939 Posts
I have, i did have one bad case that the price didn't seat but there was still some powder on the machine before that. I'll have to clean just pay close attention to see if I can spot the problem.
Unfortunately, IME, powder on the shellplate is one of the "nuisances" of the 650. It comes from the quick rotation and abrupt stop of the shellplate, causing powder to be "slopped" out of the case. At least that's what happened to me when I first started using my 650 set up for 9mm. The advice I got here was to "stabilize" the case with a finger on my left hand as it rotates into station 3. That technique seemed to help a lot, but didn't completely eliminate the problem.

Because I needed a bunch of 38 special, I converted the 650 to 38 special. With the taller case, and powder charge not anywhere near the top of the case, this "spillage" has become a non-existent problem. I'm going to be re-converting back to 9mm soon, so if someone has a real "solution" for this problem, I'd like to hear it. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,937 Posts
I've found that "powder slinging" can be easily cured by the manner in which I operate my 650's handle. Would also suggest the RCBS Lockout Die, in lieu of Dillon's Powder Check system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,689 Posts
The 650 (and any progressive press) requires a sturdy bench because of the relatively high forces involved. Operation of the press can shake the table and cause powder spillage.

The ideal bench for a progressive press would be one of those concrete picnic tables sometimes seen in public parks. :biglaugh: I don't have that, but I have a sturdy bench, anchored to the floor and located in the corner of the room, where the benchtop is attached to studs in the wall via large steel shelf brackets. I also use a 1x4 "flying buttress" to connect the top of the press to a wall stud.

I spill less than one grain of powder while loading 2000 rounds of .45 ACP. :rock:
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top