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This is a curiosity question for me:

I was replacing an ejector and found that the new ejector legs (C&S) were 0.001"+ larger in diameter than the old ejector legs. The frame holes were a perfect fit for the old ejector and, naturally, would not accept the new ejector.

I ended up using a sander with a flexible belt and very fine grit to manually reduce the diameter. It came out okay -- not great but not bad -- snug, no looseness when inserted, flush to frame.

But it was a PITA to do and took a really long time. Which got me thinking, how do the pro's really do it?

And in general, what do the pro's do for pins slightly oversize for a hole? Do you keep stock of various diameter and make pins to fit holes?
 

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Good question Nogood....and I also live by your axiom.

I'm working on a Foster frame and purchased an Ed Brown and a Caspian ejector. The Brown slides in the holes. The Caspian not a chance.

I had other things that needed addressing so I left it for another day. Now I'll get the answer.

Wilson Combat Rep....If I ream for the Caspian then I'll be held to only Caspian parts if it ever breaks or want a change....No?
 

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Couple different ways to modify the ejector legs--circular interpolation on a CNC can be quick and easy. Boring head on a manual mill or use a shell mill. If you have a lot of time you can set it up on a rotary table and mill the pins that way or jig grind the pin diameters. Most of the time it's easier to just pick another ejector that fits.

Hammer/sear Pins that are too large, I would double check the holes in the frame.
If the holes are not correct, then they get reamed to spec, if the holes are correct then I hand select pins that fit which should be very easy with any quality brand parts. Worst case scenario you have to make new pins from scratch which is time consuming and expensive. There are a lot of different makers of parts for the 1911theoretically they should all interchange. The reality is, for a number of reasons, they often do not. Hand picking and matching components can save a lot of time and fitting.
 
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