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Para Ordinance Black Ops, Kimber Ultra II SS, Colt Gold Cup National Match 70’s and 80’s Serie, misc
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wood Gas Metal Auto part Titanium
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Hand Finger Thumb Nail Auto part
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Hand Trigger Gesture Finger Wood
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Bumper Grey Automotive exterior Automotive tire Gas
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Hey guys thanks for accepting me to the forum not a crazy gun guy but know love and dabble with 1911’s just expanded my inventory by quite a bit from my Para Ordinance Black Ops Double Stack and Kimber Ultra Carry II, to go along with my duty Springfield XD, all in .45s (like there’s any other way of shooting a 1911) the new additions to the family are:
Colt Gold Cup National Match 70’s Series
Colt Gold Cup National Match 80’s Series
And a unknown 1911 that I need some help identifying the frame appears to be a 1913 colt 1911 the slide appears to be colt to but the surprising part is they have stamped serial numbers. If you guys have any insight it would definitely help!!! Thanks Crew I appreciate it thanks!!
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Air gun Wood Trigger Wood stain Gun barrel
Air gun Wood Trigger Wood stain Gun barrel
 

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The slide is a Colt postwar replacement, 7790314 is a blueprint number not a serial number. 2229 is the terminal four digits of the match pistol the slide was originally fitted to. I think I see the same on the barrel. Is the bushing numbered or branded?

The receiver is bogus. That is not a Colt or any other USGI serial number and the United States Property stamp is crooked and the wrong font. Best to assume it is an aftermarket copy.

I hope it shoots well, because it is no sort of "collectable."
 

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Para Ordinance Black Ops, Kimber Ultra II SS, Colt Gold Cup National Match 70’s and 80’s Serie, misc
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah shoots amazing it was used in leg competition for a long time just got them transferred from my buddy's grandfather yesterday who was in the Airforce like I said I’m trying to get as much info on it as possible thanks
 

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I would not write off that frame so fast. It's known that left-over and incomplete 1911 (not -A1) frames were in with tooling in storage at the outbreak of WWII. Didn't Ithaca cut the finger clearances into a bunch of such frames?
 

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The frame is likely WW1-vintage, probably a Remington-UMC. Unfortunately the original serial number and most markings were filed off and somebody crudely stamped a new serial number on it. Technically a frame with a bogus SN like that is a no-no according to ATF, but honestly the chances of anyone noticing (let alone caring) is small.
 
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I would not write off that frame so fast. It's known that left-over and incomplete 1911 (not -A1) frames were in with tooling in storage at the outbreak of WWII. Didn't Ithaca cut the finger clearances into a bunch of such frames?
Yes , but this isn't one of them , the US property mark wouldn't have been in that location , someone is trying to fake something there IMO
 

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probably a Remington-UMC.
Agree. Slanted USP stamp and E on trigger guard match.
But Remington didn't make 50000 guns, so the number is a total fabrication.
But there IS a serial number present and the registrar is unlikely to know the background.
 

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Welcome to 1911forum.
 

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I imagine it would shoot extremely well since I think it is a match pistol that probably was put together by a military shooting team armorer or member. The 'AF' on the slide and barrel is interesting and there is one more letter after 'F' I can't make out. I wonder if it came out of the Air Force. That would be a very interesting piece to take apart and examine.
 

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The frame has obviously been sanitized at some point for whatever reason. We can confirm that there's a pre 1924 frame and a post 1947 replacement slide. The question is whether this was the work of a military armorer or just something someone threw together later. Either way, it looks pretty well done.
 
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