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Discussion Starter #1
Yesterday I bought another Cobra. Dated at '69. It's blue, about 95%, and looks as if it was fired very little. At $275 out the door, I couldn't pass it up. The issue is: In cocking the gun slowly it locks up tight over 4 holes just before the piece is cocked. However over 2 holes it is just a tad shy of lock up as the gun achieves cocked position. But upon pulling the trigger (as the gun achieves full lock up) the two chambers in question move into lock up before the hammer falls. Is this acceptable? Any answers would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Yesterday I bought another Cobra. Dated at '69. It's blue, about 95%, and looks as if it was fired very little. At $275 out the door, I couldn't pass it up. The issue is: In cocking the gun slowly it locks up tight over 4 holes just before the piece is cocked. However over 2 holes it is just a tad shy of lock up as the gun achieves cocked position. But upon pulling the trigger (as the gun achieves full lock up) the two chambers in question move into lock up before the hammer falls. Is this acceptable? Any answers would be greatly appreciated.

popeye,

I can't really understand what you mean by "four holes". FULL lock-up of the cylinder is achieved when the trigger is pulled all the way back in the back in the trigger guard just after your revolver goes bang. That's when the "cylinder lock bolt" or the "cylinder stop" is pushed upward to it's fullest when the trigger is pulled by your finger for firing. Your description sounds right as being acceptable. If your not sure it's best to have a smith look at it. Any used gun I buy is checked out by my smith before I do anything.

In either case you have a fantastic revolver as I collect Colt "snubbies" for my collection. Anything in the "D" frame is a catch to my eye. Currently I'm looking for a Colt "Commando" to seat along side my "Agent".

Good luck,

rimfire,22
 

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Discussion Starter #3
By "four holes" I used a euphemism for chambers. So lock up occurs when the gun is cocked over four chambers. Over two chambers the bolt does not snap into the arc shaped recesses in the cyl. until the trigger is pulled. I've been buying revolvers for 40 years, and I don't keep as many as I used to. I am still a great S&W fan. With a Smith, the cyl. positioning mech. and it's operation is different. I have decided on the Det. Spec. format as my carry gun with the short frame, no eject. rod shroud Cobra as my favorite. My latest acquisition is my 3rd Cobra of this type and vintage. I also have a Det. Spec. long frame dated '66 as I remember. The other Cobras and Det. Spec. all lock up as I would expect. I feel that I have enough experience to state that the newest gun is safe to shoot. Thank you for your reply.
 

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popeye,

Your knowledge of revolver mechanism is vast and well beyond me. My only solution to you question is to have a good smith look at it. I remember Colt still has parts in stock that might fir your bill if necessary. From your description it's been lightly used if any and most likely it'll run as is but for safety sake I'd still have a smith check it out for you.

Usually for myself I'd clean mine up and give it a shot or two and clean it up again for storage. I can continue to collect Colts til I pass away. Colt just doesn't make em like they use to and I can only hope they'll be very strong in the near future.

Take care,

rimfire,22
 

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Discussion Starter #5
popeye,

Your knowledge of revolver mechanism is vast and well beyond me.

rimfire,22
That's probably not true. I hope my last post was not taken as if I was a " know it all". I didn't mean to offend. If it was taken that way I apologize. I'll either keep this gun as it is as a shooter, or sell it at an upcoming gunshow.

Take care, and always wear clean underwear, Jim
 
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