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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I picked up a new WWI Repro from a local store today and took it straight to the range.

I am used to shooting pretty tricked out 1911s.

Almost all of my 1911s have had trigger jobs, bomars, checkered front straps, etc.

I was pretty underwhelmed with the performance of the gun. It seemed to shoot about 6" low at 25 yards and the trigger pull is quite mushy. It also had quite a few FTFs and several instances of the extractor picking up a live round.

It reminds me a lot of the Colt Custom 38 super (an El Cen derivative) that I have had for several years and that I have been reluctant to alter as a result of its good looking high polish finish.

Is there anything I can do to get the trigger to a more acceptable pull and get a better rear sight without dramatically altering the appearance of the gun?

It seems like I have seen some higher profile military sights which fit the 1911A1 government rear sight cut.

I could also live with some C & S trigger group parts and perhaps even a STI long bow trigger.

It is a beautiful gun and I don't regret buying it, but I would like to upgrade its performance.

Thanks.
 

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First off, if it shoots 6" low make sure it's the gun and not just you. If you're used to customized 1911's this one is obviously going to feel and handle a lot differently. Nobody else on this forum has reported their WW1 replica shooting high or low, so if it truly does then you might want to consider sending it back under warranty. Perhaps the barrel or bushing has an issue that needs to be addressed.

Regarding the trigger pull, it sounds like all you need is a trigger job done to it by a decent gunsmith. The existing parts shouldn't need replacing. Who knows, once that is done it may automatically solve the POI problem as well.
 

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Have to say I agree w/dsk. If it's for sure the gun and not you, it sounds like Colt has some warranty work to do.

On another note, not to be critical, but I've never understood guys who pay premium prices for a repro, replica, collectible, or whatever, and then spend a bunch more money changing it into something it was never intended to be.
 

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I always thought the WW1 Replica might be a cool base gun for a "retro" custom project, but I gotta agree it's a bit pricey for that sort of thing. I think a better project would be to have one covered in fancy engraving, polished and re-blued in Carbonia, and then given some ivory grips. Yummy...
 

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Ooooh! Now you're talking!:)
 

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Para2 said:
On another note, not to be critical, but I've never understood guys who pay premium prices for a repro, replica, collectible, or whatever, and then spend a bunch more money changing it into something it was never intended to be.
Para2, I share your opinion on this. I own one of the Colt WW2 repros, and I have a WW1 repro on order from my dealer. I will not shoot either of these pistols, but will pass them on, NIB, to my sons.

I would not buy something that the manufacturer clearly intends to sell for its esthetic value, and then talk about modifying it. Colt makes a lot of pistols that would serve admirably as project guns, but I don't think the WW1 repro is one of them.

On the other hand...any pistol should shoot reliably and accurately, and if someone does choose to shoot his repro or other collectible pistol, he has the right to expect it to function properly.
 

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I'm surprised to hear of the FTF issues... new Colts almost always run like tops... I would guess that all your gun needs is an extractor adjustment to solve all the feeding issues. As for the inaccuracy... as mentioned above, that isn't expected and may be a "Colt needs to fix" issue... they'll pay shipping both ways...
 

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The FTF would piss me off big time. You could, and this I am sure you know, improve accuracy simply by putting a NM bushing on the pistol. I think it should remember that the WWI and WWII were combat guns not target guns, a hit at 25 yards was likely relief.

I would use the Repo's for a "Retro" project simply becuase the gun itself is not part of antiquity. It is a copy. A very nice copy other than the roll marks which is part of the gripe that many have against Colt and that is, not maintaining the quality of the past in finish and sometimes function.

These are beautiful pistols and when I have enough Series 70's and post war guns along with another Ed Brown and a few customs, I'm gonna buy one.:p
 

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I got a WWI repro early last week, and shot it yesterday.

I only shot 7 magzines, or 49 rounds. I had two feed failures, both with JHPs. In each case, the round stopped just short of chambering, and a tap on the magazine caused the slide to close. Not perfect, but I didn't think that was too bad.

Regarding sights, mine was a traded-in gun, and the prior owner had replaced the sights. They look like King's Hardball sights, which you might want to look at also. They fit standard dovetails and are retro-looking, as the design has been around forever. I think they look like the sights on early Match guns.

I like the trigger on mine. In fact, all of the reports I've heard or read say the same. Maybe yours has some dried shipping grease/crud that worked loose. Then again, perhaps you got the lemon trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the advice, guys.

I am pretty sure that the gun shoots way low, because after not being able to see where (or what part of the cardboard target - back) I was hitting at 25 yards, I benched it at 7 yards, and it was even way low at that distance.

I also shot my RRA LM, Valtro, SA TRP Opr, STI Range Master and 70 Series Gold Cup, and shot pretty well at 25 yards. I didn't have to make any sight adjustments at all, so I don't think the low shooting on the Repro was shooter error.

I think that I will send it back to Colt, certainly before I let my local 'smith (who does outstanding 1911 customization) do a trigger job on it and insert the Yost rear sight.

I may even evaluate just sending it to Ted Yost and letting him work his magic.

As an aside, I shoot (and enjoy) all of my guns. I went to the Colt Collectors Assn convention about 5 years ago and picked up 5 shiney revolvers. After tripping over them in my safe for several years, because I couldn't bring myself to put a cylinder line on them, I sold all but 1 of them.

Para2 - welcome to the forum and be sure to stick around.
 

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Shoot it and enjoy it. It's a modern made reproduction, not a real war baby. Shoot it, modify it, and enjoy it for all it's worth.

I can see babying a real 1918 dated Colt (I'd have to shoot it a few times), but bang the snot out of a reproduction.

Send it back to Colt with your list of issues and let them do their thing.
 

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Molonlabe 28, thanks! I like it here so far!

Beemerguy53,(almost called you beermeguy!:biglaugh: ) I also agree with the good shooter part. I have a WWII Reissue/repro, and it, and all my guns are shooters. If they don't work right, they get warranty work, or they get traded for something that does work!
 

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GunsnRovers said:
I can see babying a real 1918 dated Colt (I'd have to shoot it a few times), but bang the snot out of a reproduction.
While I don't shoot mine, I agree that the best use for these replicas is to shoot and get the feel for how the original handles. Save the wear and tear on the old ones, because they're still going up and UP and UP in value. These replicas will not climb much in worth until probably when your grandkids are drawing Social Security.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
DSK-

Do you think that there is much of a chance that Colt will make a National Match (perhaps pre-war) repro?

That would certainly be one to add to the collection.

I would also like to see a Woodsman Target Match Bullseye (1st Ed.) repro and an early Service Model Ace.
 

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Poor trigger?

I am realy suprised that you feel the trigger is poor. The trigger on my Repro is a very light 3.5 lbs. (my estimate, not actually measured.) and it is very crisp. Maybe mine was made on Tuesday, and you got a Friday model. I'd send yours back just for this reason.
 

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molonlabe28 said:
DSK-

Do you think that there is much of a chance that Colt will make a National Match (perhaps pre-war) repro?

That would certainly be one to add to the collection.
I wish they would, but I'm pretty sure they won't. Folks will immediately compare them to the originals, which I have to say were the epitome of the 1911. There probably aren't enough guys still working for Colt that are good enough to put them together like that still, and even if there were Colt would have to charge $2000 or more for them. Even the originals were far too expensive for the average working man to afford back in the 1930's, which is why so few were made.
 

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DHart said:
I'm surprised to hear of the FTF issues... new Colts almost always run like tops... I would guess that all your gun needs is an extractor adjustment to solve all the feeding issues. As for the inaccuracy... as mentioned above, that isn't expected and may be a "Colt needs to fix" issue... they'll pay shipping both ways...
My new stainless Series 70 was a tempermental b**ch on its first trip to the range, failing to chamber rounds numerous times. When I got home I discovered the extractor tension was off the charts. Perhaps Colt has a fresh issue to contend with- a new employee who hasn't been properly trained how to properly adjust an extractor.
 

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dsk... yeah, Colts are usually so reliable right out of the box... perhaps their "extractor technician" has had some "off days". :rolleyes:
 
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