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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just place the order for my first gun - a P16-40.

It should arrive at the range in a couple of weeks.

My question is what do I have to do to the gun before my first shoot?

Do I need to do a field strip? Or can I just do a quick wipe down on the gun to get rid of any oil that might be on the surface?

TIA
 

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I actually DETAIL strip any new gun I get before shooting. If you are comfortable doing this, it is a good idea to lube all the internals which may or may not have got greased at the factory. Generally, most factory guns are suitably lubricated out of the box, but I do it for my own peace of mind.

I also get rid of all the factory lube (since I don't necessarily know what it is) and replace it with a known, trusted lube. Para has been shipping with TW-25 lately, and that IS a good lube. I prefer Brownell's action lube, so I prefer my parts to break-in/seat with the lube that I will be using in the future.

Of course my wife (and a few others on the forum) think I'm pretty anal
, so the advice I've given you is probably overkill - but it works for me.

You may also want to run a patch or two of Hoppes #9 down the bore, just to clean it up a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Shane,

Thanks for the quick replies. I should have guessed that a fellow Canadian would be the first to come to my aid. :)

I'm not comfortable detail stripping the gun. Do I need to send it to a gunsmith to do it, or can I go with doing it for a while.

Since this is my first gun, I'm totally new to a lot of this.... What do you mean by getting rid of the factory lube? Are you talking about the surface oil?

I have tried my hand at field stripping and cleanning once. When I did it, I used "gun oil". Am I do use the TW-25 instead, or is it for something different?

TIA

Nick
 

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Shane was talking about personal preferences where the oil was concerned. You should at the very least inspect your pistol before you shoot it. Check the bore to be sure that it is clear. It has been factory fired, so you will most likely see a little residue in the barrel and on the breech face. No need to be worried though. You can shoot it right out of the box. After your first shooting day, it would be wise to clean it. I think Para is shipping a small tube of TW-25 lube with the pistol, so you will have some to lube it up when you assemble it after cleaning. BE SURE TO READ YOUR MANUAL BEFORE YOU USE THE PISTOL. That's very important.
And of course, report in here how it worked for you, and we'll take it from there.....and welcome to the forum!!!!


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Really interesting....Don't ya think??
 

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Good advice from Newton too.

As for as detail stripping, check out this site for detailed instructions. www.m1911.org.
Lots of good info there. Also, www.wilsoncombat.com has a handy disassembly/maintenance booklet.

Don't be afraid to ask questions here either! You'll get some great advice. Take it slow and easy, and get to know your gun. You will not need to send it to a gunsmith, if you understand how all the parts fit together. It's not that complicated really, but it certainly can be intimidating at first.

My comment about getting rid of the factory lube, is simply what I do with a new gun. I degrease all the internal parts, and re-lube with the oil/grease of my choice. The TW-25 shipped with your gun is a good choice. You may end up finding your own favourite over time however. There are several good lubes that all work fine - it all comes down to personal preference!

Like Newton said, my original post was simply my personal preference. You should definitely do a field strip first, and make sure the slide rails are well-lubed. You can always learn about the internals of your gun once you've fired it and had a bit of fun first.




[This message has been edited by shane45-1911 (edited 07-16-2001).]
 

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Congragulations on your choice of gun. You should field strip before shooting and make a few passes through the bore to get whatever they packed in there to perserve the rifling out. Reassemble and shoot. It will possibly take 500 or so rounds to properly "break in", meaning don't panic if you have a few malfunctions in that time.

Now that you've gotten started, be prepared for the stuff that goes with shooting. Reloading, the incessant "need" for more guns, competition...
 

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Well, before the pistol gets there you need to order a 10mm Auto barrel for the P16 and a .357 Sig to boot.

Then when your new pistola arrives, you break it down fit the barrels (if they need fitting) and then take that puppy to the range and break it in with all 3 calibers!

Derek
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all the good advice, one and all.

Newton - Would you happen to know how many rounds the factory normally fired for each new pistol?

I downloaded the manual from Para's web site, and have been reading it diligently.

BTW you don't happen to be shooting up at United too?

Shane - I have heard about the Wilson book. Been meaning to but just haven't gotten around to ordering one.

PK - I will do just what you suggest with field striping and cleaning the bore.

viesczy - the other barrels might have to wait a little longer... :)
 

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I can't say how many rounds for non-LEO for sure, but I do know it's at least one mag including Proof Loads. MHO is probably 1 flawless mag to guarantee all functions and feeding. No pistols go out unless they pass a perfect mag shot test. I've been up to United in Gormley a few times, but I'm not a member there. Actually took my course up there.

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Really interesting....Don't ya think??
 

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first gun, eh?

Cleaning kit (lots of patches)? I like breakfree clp for cleaning and lube.

Holster?

Quick access safe (minivault or multivault)?

Safety course (good way to meet new shooting friends)?


Is the gun to be used for self defense? Most prefer some kind of hollowpoint round for this purpose...you should be aware that not all hollowpoint round feed 100% in 1911-style guns. You should proof the gun with the type of ammo you plan to use for this purpose, in addition to the practice ammo (generally cheaper ball fmj) you use at the range.


Just some thoughts, n2299. Re: the field strip/detail strip...seems daunting at first, you'll be doing it blindfolded before long. I've got a p16, too. Like it a lot.

Good luck and give us a range report!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Newton - What's a "Proof Load"?

If you don't mind me asking.. where to you do your shooting? Is there another place closer to the city then United?

hammer4nc - I picked up a cleaning kit made by Gunslick. Is this a good brand?

Holsters - can't used them till I get my IPSC Black Badge at the range. Conceal carry? Totally out of the question for this Canadian. :)

Safety Course - took a couple alrady. 15hrs for the government and 3 for the range.

Safe - I was looking at a Stack-On. Any comments about them?

Ammo - Newton and Shane would know for sure, but I think we can only use FMJ up here.
 

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Proof Loads are high pressure loads used to break in and test a barrel to make sure it is sound. It also is a reliable test for a new pistol to make sure it can withstand stresses above and beyond what will normally be subjected to the pistol. Proof Loads are always the first thing that gets fed to a new built pistol. (By the manufacturer or custom smith...not the user)
Personal defense ammo is a non-issue in Canada since it is unlawfull to protect one's self with a firearm in Canada.
As for what you use at the range for competition, it's goverened by the competition, and Canadian Law. Wad cutter, semi-wad cutter, hard ball, etc. Hollow point, as far as I know, has some limitations in Canada. Hunting, and Law Enforcement is about it I think.
As for shooting clubs in and around the city, I'm not sure, but I can ask around, and maybe post a list if I can find one.
Hope this was helpfull.
Hey...be proud and publish that you're from Canada eh...


*Canadian Flag URL was "STOLEN" from Shane 45-1911* (Had to add that.....thanks Shane!!!)
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Really interesting....Don't ya think??

[This message has been edited by Newton (edited 07-17-2001).]

[This message has been edited by Newton (edited 07-17-2001).]
 

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Originally posted by Newton:
Personal defense ammo is a non-issue in Canada since it is unlawfull to protect one's self with a firearm in Canada.
But I hope no one is stupid enough to break into my house and try to harm my wife or daughter in order to test that theory!


Thanks for the good info Newton, and I'll only add that HP PISTOL ammo is only for LEO in Canada. We all know that you can't hunt with a handgun in the Great White North anyway! HP rifle ammo is still legal - for now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Newton - while we're on the topic of different ammo... All I have been shooting till now have been range reloads FMJ. I have been reading a bit about lead bullets. What's a lead bullet? I have read that it should not be use in certain guns like Glocks. Is it ok, to use it with mine?

It's will be great to have a list of shooting club around town.

Shane - How about jacketed hollowpoint? Are they illegal for us as well?
 

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Originally posted by n2299:
Shane - How about jacketed hollowpoint? Are they illegal for us as well?
Sorry Nick, our government has decided that you will become a complete raving, foaming-at-the-mouth lunatic if they give you access to any kind of hollowpoint ammo, so - yes - they are illegal too. (Lead or FMJ only for you my psycho friend!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Originally posted by shane45-1911:
Sorry Nick, our government has decided that you will become a complete raving, foaming-at-the-mouth lunatic if they give you access to any kind of hollowpoint ammo, so - yes - they are illegal too. (Lead or FMJ only for you my psycho friend!)


You think I can convince them that a "complete raving, foaming-at-the-mouth lunatic" is my normal state of being. :)

what's the difference between FMJ and Lead bullet?
 

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FMJ is a brass or copper covered lead bullet. When someone refers to a lead bullet, they are speaking of unjacketed, or partial jacketed. The reason they don't recommend them is that they foul the barrel quicker than jacketed. Another consideration is Lead Poisoning. Some people who shoot a lot can get lead poisoning, and can get it a lot more severe and quicker when using lead bullets. As far as I know, all bullets contain lead (consumer available ammo).
If you plan on shooting a lot, you should get a respirator to protect yourself from any potential poisoning. I think if you do a search in General Gun Discussion, you can find a thread or two on that issue.
As for the bullet makeup, if you review your safety course book, you'll find some great reference material on the topic. Hopefully your instructor has pointed out the benefits of each type of ammo according to the type of shooting you intend to do.

On the subject of can you use lead bullets....Sure you can....but why would you want to? Unjacketed lead will mushroom and break apart upon contacting or penetrating a surface. Messy stuff....afterall, you can only use your pistol for sporting....why would you want a messy unjacketed bullet?
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Really interesting....Don't ya think??

[This message has been edited by Newton (edited 07-17-2001).]
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Newton,

I did take a look at the firearms safety course book. I guess the part that confused me was that it showed a Lead Round Nose. And as far as I can tell it look the same as the FMJ round nose. Plus the fact I know that all bullets contain lead, eg, in the primer.

Would you remcommend using a respirator even if I was shooting FMJ?

And what would be your defination of "shooting a lot"? 500 rounds a week?

Thanks again for all the good advice. :)
 

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Guys, the thing to remember with lead, is that most of the contamination comes from the compound used in the primer itself, not from the lead bullet itself. Most modern ranges have a down-draft ventilation system that sucks the smoke and air-born contaminants DOWN RANGE, away from the shooter.

Lead is safe if you wash your hands after handling it. It is also a LOT cheaper to shoot than jacketed. You'll go broke pretty fast shooting factory FMJ!!!
 
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