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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After detail stripping the new Government and closely examining each part, I don't think any of them are MIM, not even the slide stop, thumb safety, or the grip safety. So I called Colt, and the rep said they did try a few MIMs earlier, but went back to all cast parts. I'm not 100% on this since I haven't seen them make one of these guns with my own eyes. I'm just saying that my conclusions about the parts agree with what the rep said.
 

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did your sear appear to have small burs on it, right at the point? All the parts inside my new one are stainless colored, whatever that means *shrugs*..it shoots..lol
 

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If you look at some of the Colt parts, you'll see a small circle where the cast part comes off the "casting tree". (What, you didn't know sears DO grow on trees? :)

If you're in a gunshop, look at the hammer on a Kimber, it has what looks like a "sinkhole" mark on the face. Some other internal parts have the same mark. I assume that's the mark of MIM, though I don't see why they don't make the part a little over sized on that area and then machine it lightly so it looked better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My sear doesn't have burrs on the nose, but the engagement surface is not the smoothest or straightest I've ever seen. It doesn't look to have been ground, like you'd see in an aftermarket sear. The rest of the internals appear to be either stainless or in the white. I also see the casting circles and the molding lines.
 

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Well, I'm not sure of the exact production process, but current Colts have the sear, disconnector and magazine catch produced by a casting process.
They are SUPERIOR parts. I use nothing but Colt disconnectors for my trigger jobs, on which I extend a 'Lifetime Warranty'.
On a Colt, I'll also use the factory sear and hammer. Perhaps the tool steel sears are a bit better, but I've never seen the need.
And I do a LOT of trigger jobs.
Of the clones, Kimber and Springfield included, the fire control components are definitely INFERIOR.
Unlike many of the more outspoken members of this forum, I am a professional pistolsmith.
I have supported my family for 15 years by means of my 1911 work. Check my profile and go to my PhotoPoint albums, the proof is in the pudding!
Approach me with an unlimited budget, ask me for a 'best grade' gun.....I'll recommend a 1991A1 as the base.
As to Colt's use of plastic parts, both the trigger and the mainspring housings are MORE than adequate, and in many circumstances, actually SUPERIOR to aftermarket products. The triggers are molded to the trigger bows, I have never seen one seperate. I add an overtravel set-screw and a set-screw top and bottom to eliminate excess play. It only takes a few minutes and you have a lightweight, self-lubricating trigger the equal of any of the aftermarkets.
My personal LW Commander is fitted with the original Colt plastic mainspring housing. It also is self-lubricating and more wear resistant than an aluminum housing. I have never seen one fail.
The series 80 safety system is a GOOD thing, and in the hands of a competent smith, poses no obstacles or potential failures. To the user of a series 80, simply PAY ATTENTION while reassembling and check function by means of a pencil down the bore.
Those who 'knock' Colt's are simply ignorant and/or misinformed.

Chuck Rogers
Rogers Precision

CHEAP-FAST-GOOD
Pick any two!
 

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Excellent post Chuck. I just bought a new Colt 1991-A1 SS. The parts looked more substantial to me vs. the Kimber parts that I have seen. I am not a professional pistolsmith so I figured what the heck do I know. Nice to know that my novice notion was correct. I own Colt, Springfield, & Kimber pistols. My new Colt is an awesome pistol. More people should consider Colt when looking to buy a new .45 style pistol.

Shooter Ready?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Check out Chuck's pictures, some pretty radical custom jobs there. Chuck, I take it one of your interests is building custom comps?
Thanks for your info about the internal parts. I agree with you that the plastic triggers hold advantages over any other material. I do think they're ugly though. They would look much better if they had a pattern or holes cut out in their center. Or if they were shorter.
 
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