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Hello, all. NOS Colt replacement slide came in today. From what I understand, there are fully hardened. Is that correct? I'm wanting to use it as "shooter" slide on my WWII frames. And also, about what time frame were these issued? Is the Korean War-era correct, prior to the 7790314 marked units?

Thanks in advance, and happy Thanksgiving.


 

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According to Clawson, hard slides were introduced by Colt in 1947. In 1962 the government introduced the 7791435 National Match slides. The manufacturers name or five digit code was applied to the right side of the slide
 

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Yours is a Korean War-era replacement slide, and yes they're fully hardened. The ones with the Colt rollmarks on the LH side are quite sought-after... in fact I tried for years to pick one up, only to be outbid on eBay or Gunbroker every single time.
 

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Yours is a Korean War-era replacement slide, and yes they're fully hardened. The ones with the Colt rollmarks on the LH side are quite sought-after... in fact I tried for years to pick one up, only to be outbid on eBay or Gunbroker every single time.
Could you expand on that a bit? By rollmarks do you mean some specific area of the marking or the entire Colt marking? On mine, the left side marks are much lighter than those on the right.

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Sorry if the question is a stupid one. I'm just trying to understand what "rollmarks" entails since I've found other posts where people refer to specific areas of the markings and not the entire marking itself.
 

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The left and right side roll marks on your hard slide are consistent with Colt Government Model (commercial slides) manufactured from 1949-1955. The same marks were used on Colt (USGI) replacement slides
Google up Colt Government Model slides from 1946-mid 1947, 1948-1955 and then 1956 onward. You'll see the changes in the corporate name, the location of the rampant Colt, calibre to caliber, and the type font used.
I know, this is a clear as mud. I finally understood it when I researched/bought Government Models dated 1946-1956 and the slide markings were different
 

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The left and right side roll marks on your hard slide are consistent with Colt Government Model (commercial slides) manufactured from 1949-1955. The same marks were used on Colt (USGI) replacement slides
Google up Colt Government Model slides from 1946-mid 1947, 1948-1955 and then 1956 onward. You'll see the changes in the corporate name, the location of the rampant Colt, calibre to caliber, and the type font used.
I know, this is a clear as mud. I finally understood it when I researched/bought Government Models dated 1946-1956 and the slide markings were different
Ok, I did see pictures of the various changes in Colt slide markings over the years so it makes sense. My 1911A1 came from CMP but has no arsenal rebuild marks. I assume the slide was changed at unit or Depot level during a refit/repair. So, at some point, the government used these as replacement slides.
 

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The government got caught in a jam when Korea got hot and turned to Colt for some replacement slides. Since this was an emergency, the standards for government markings were waived. Colt took slides from the assembly process for their current pistol after they were roll-marked but before polishing/bluing and Parkerized them, which resulted in an acceptable non-glare military finish. These were the first fully-hardened slides to be used by the military. Later, when the government went out to contract for more slides, Colt also provided some but they were marked more in accordance with the standards, having only the Colt 'address' on the RH slide and the drawing number on the LH side. All other contractors had to use the five-digit 'cage code' on the RH side.
It is possible that a slide like yours was actually issued on a regular Government Model after polishing and bluing and was later Parkerized and put on a U.S. frame. This gets dicey because the only way to tell it was originally used on a Gov Model is that it was polished after roll-marking, which leveled the roll mark and in many cases weakened it. Looking at one like pictured above, you can easily see the steel that was displaced by the die pushed up around the edges of the characters. So, for what it's worth, these slides are getting more and more rare all the time.
 

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The government got caught in a jam when Korea got hot and turned to Colt for some replacement slides. Since this was an emergency, the standards for government markings were waived. Colt took slides from the assembly process for their current pistol after they were roll-marked but before polishing/bluing and Parkerized them, which resulted in an acceptable non-glare military finish. These were the first fully-hardened slides to be used by the military. Later, when the government went out to contract for more slides, Colt also provided some but they were marked more in accordance with the standards, having only the Colt 'address' on the RH slide and the drawing number on the LH side. All other contractors had to use the five-digit 'cage code' on the RH side.
It is possible that a slide like yours was actually issued on a regular Government Model after polishing and bluing and was later Parkerized and put on a U.S. frame. This gets dicey because the only way to tell it was originally used on a Gov Model is that it was polished after roll-marking, which leveled the roll mark and in many cases weakened it. Looking at one like pictured above, you can easily see the steel that was displaced by the die pushed up around the edges of the characters. So, for what it's worth, these slides are getting more and more rare all the time.
Thanks. That explains how the slide came to be put on my pistol. It has been under USGI control since the original RR frame was delivered after manufacture. Not sure when the slide was replaced but it had to have been done within the Army system.
 

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The dead giveaway for a GI slide is the horizontal machining marks across the flats, which your slide has. On a commercial slide the flats are polished mirror-bright, removing all traces of the machining marks.
 

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Good point about the machining marks on the flats. Also the conclusion of when it met the frame, because the slides bought by the government didn't get into civilian hands in any significant numbers until at least the first DCM/NRA sale, and you know your pistol came directly from government stores. If the pistol has been in civilian circulation, you can't be sure.
 
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