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Discussion Starter #1
I am 99.9% that the problem is the magazines but I still wanted to bounce it off of you guys. My new CQB is having problems (about 50% of the time) feeding the first round of a full magazine. A light tap on the bottom will normally get it back into action. I have 6 Wilson 10 round magazines and they all seem to do it....sometimes. And, I only put 9 rounds in them. I have tried just about everything I can think of to isolate the problem. I did not have any problems at the range with ball ammo. I mixed in a few Silvertips and they fed fine, buy I probably didn't put many, if any on top. I unload all of my mags over the weekend and rotate the mags weekly. It seems to happen more often with the slingshot, and less often when I release the slide stop. I have only put around 250 rounds through it, so it may just need some more break in time!?! I truly don't think it is the pistol, but I don't want to spend a bunch of money on Tripp mags unless absolutely needed. Wilsons are supposed to be top of the line anyway, right?

Anyway, I still love the pistol, I just want to eliminate this problem completely. Neither of my .45 ACP Baers do this. Do you think 38 Super is the problem? I hope not, cause I'm hooked on the caliber!!
 

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Looking more and more at 38 Super being my next pistol, curious to see what others say your issue is.
 

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.38 Super should, if anything, feed more smoothly than a .45. I'd be suspicious of the +1 mags.
 

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.38 Super is a fantabulous round, don't leave it! Try this, keep 1 in the pipe,throw in a full mag,pull the hammer back and let fly. My Colt used to bite into the first round of a fresh mag every once and a while,and that was exactly the problem........the top round would get all the spring pressure focused on the rear of the casing, but the front could just wiggle up and down grossly(i don't mean just a little). New mags solved my prob. and I started off with stock Colts and replaced them with stock Colts.
 

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I don't know, but you should leave your mags loaded. The constant loading and unloading is what effects the spring. Leaving the mag loaded is just as good as leaving it unloaded.
 

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Fringe said:
I don't know, but you should leave your mags loaded. The constant loading and unloading is what effects the spring. Leaving the mag loaded is just as good as leaving it unloaded.
Unless you can back that up, I have to call B.S. My understanding is that springs get weaker due to a process called "creep", or "time dependent deformation of materials under constant stress".

Magazine springs are good for many thousands of fatigue cycles, which is what you are referring to. Another few hundred here or there will not contribute to failure even a whit.
 

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Guns with fully supported, ramped barrels sometimes need a bit of extra work to ensure reliability. What you are describing can be caused by a too-steep ramp, or a too-heavy recoil spring. Silvertips should feed 100% through your super. I have found Wilson mags to be OK in .38 Super but not as reliable as Metalform round follower mags or even factory Colt mags but YMMV. I replace my Wilson .38 mag spings with ISMI springs. I lose a round, but they work better and lock back with more authority. Before you send your gun back, try that approach.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Update on the problem.....

I went to the range today to try a few more things. I loaded all of my magazines with 7 rounds of ball and then two silvertips on top. I didn't have enough duty ammo to use only silvertips. Most of my mags are Wilson 10 rounders, but I can't get 10 rounds in them.

Anyway, I did this for 150 rounds of ball and about 40 rounds of silvertips. I went through all of my magazines at least twice. All of them worked perfectly everytime except for one of the nine round magazines. The top silvertip would chamber and when fired, the second silvertip would hang just a bit. A light tap of the bottom of the mag would make it chamber. I tried that magazine again, but only loaded 8 rounds (6 ball, 2 silvertips) and the problem seemed to be solved. The pistol is a blast to shoot too!! Thanks Bill Wilson!

I guess I don't really have much of a problem after all.
 

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Just for giggles try the ISMI springs and resign yourself to loading 9 rds in the mag. Work great in all of my Supers and 9x23's.
 

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I would try a few hundred more rounds and if the problem persists, send the dirty gun and mags back to Wilson. You should have a perfect bottom feeder back in 1 week.
 

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Tim K said:
Unless you can back that up, I have to call B.S. My understanding is that springs get weaker due to a process called "creep", or "time dependent deformation of materials under constant stress".

Magazine springs are good for many thousands of fatigue cycles, which is what you are referring to. Another few hundred here or there will not contribute to failure even a whit.
Have a look at this article:
http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0BTT/is_163_27/ai_99130369
 

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Sullybr549 said:
At first glance, I think I might disagree with the author of that article as well. His contention is that creep does not occur in magazine springs. Consider this, a new mag springs has some free length. The very first time you load up that magazine, the spring takes a permanent deformation or set and the free length is reduced. This is a clear illustration that the springs are being operated at or near the yeild point for the material. Creep is accelerated under two conditions, elevated temperature or very high stress. Temperature is obviously not an issue for us, but I think the stress level might be plenty high for creep to occur.

One thing I hadn't considered was the potential for fatigue in spring life. The number of cycles a mag spring sees in its lifetime is insignificant in normal fatigue calculations. However, due to the aforementioned high stress levels, mag springs might be experiencing something called low-cycle fatigue which occurs when an engineering material is subjected to relatively few cycles at stress levels near the yield point. Interesting.

Upon reflection, I'm guessing that both processes are at work in the degradation of mag springs, and that constant compression (leaving the mag loaded) and cycling (loading and unloading) contribute.

My apologies to the original poster for the hi-jack. It's an interesting subject to an old engineer.
 

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...and one that has been discussed to no end. I think it is prudent to treat the mags as they were designed, to be loaded and in a gun to deliver rounds to the machine that fires them.
Springs will eventually wear out and need to be replaced, but one should not loose sleep on whether or not the bullets in their mag have been in there too long and are stressing the spring. They should worry about how they will proceed in a defensive situation and practice, practice, practice.
All this while maintaining a well kept firearm.
Merry Christmas and as above, sorry for the OT>
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Well, it seems a simple change from a 12 pound recoil spring to a 14 pound recoil spring solved the problem. I double checked with Wilson to see if the extra two pounds was a problem and they advised "as long as it runs with it, it won't hurt it". The 9 round magazine that always caused a FTF on the second silvertip, worked perfectly.
 

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Unless you can back that up, I have to call B.S. My understanding is that springs get weaker due to a process called "creep", or "time dependent deformation of materials under constant stress".

I agree with Fringe.....I have fired many hundreds of rounds out of mags that were loaded in WWII, sat for 60 years, and functioned perfectly. My Wilson mags need the springs replaced after a few thousand rounds.
Springs fatigue after constant use.
 
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