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Hi, I would like to hear from anyone who has taken this course. I have owned my Springfield 1911 MilSpec for about 8 years. Fired about 2500 rounds at the range. Took a Defensive Handgun course about 5 years ago and learned a lot. I just want to get occasional training from a variety of sources to learn what I can and avoid developing bad habits.
 

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Hi, I would like to hear from anyone who has taken this course. I have owned my Springfield 1911 MilSpec for about 8 years. Fired about 2500 rounds at the range. Took a Defensive Handgun course about 5 years ago and learned a lot. I just want to get occasional training from a variety of sources to learn what I can and avoid developing bad habits.
It’s very fundamental, heavy on gun safety, covers different kinds of pistols, parts of a pistol, ammunition, grip, sight alignment, breathing, etc. I taught it for several years as a requirement for Ohio CCW.
 

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It is good to have Certificate from that course, it opens doors to online CC permits (no live fire required).
You can also go farther after that course and become NRA Basic Pistol Instructor.
But like Plug Run Arms mentioned, this is a basic stuff, focused on shooting fundamentals. It has nothing to defensive shooting nor bullseye shooting. There is a lot of theory, talking, discussing. Live fire is just extension to the stuff you just learned. But do not expect you will shoot better after this course. It only prepares you for next levels and these next levels will help you to get good habits and "avoid developing bad habits".

To visualize this course look at the final evolution - to get the Certificate you have to pass written exam (not big deal at all) and put 20 holes in 4" circle from 10 feet. ;)
 

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It is good to have Certificate from that course, it opens doors to online CC permits (no live fire required).
You can also go farther after that course and become NRA Basic Pistol Instructor.
But like Plug Run Arms mentioned, this is a basic stuff, focused on shooting fundamentals. It has nothing to defensive shooting nor bullseye shooting. There is a lot of theory, talking, discussing. Live fire is just extension to the stuff you just learned. But do not expect you will shoot better after this course. It only prepares you for next levels and these next levels will help you to get good habits and "avoid developing bad habits".

To visualize this course look at the final evolution - to get the Certificate you have to pass written exam (not big deal at all) and put 20 holes in 4" circle from 10 feet. ;)
And there are levels above that that enter into the marksmanship levels of quallification. One can go as far as they want, or stop at any point. As far as classes, there are also some classes that cover laws on self-defense (and the tactics of it) in your locality like Personal Protection in the Home and Personal Protection Outside the Home that go into more advanced techniques and strategies of home defense and self-defense. Additionally, many of these instructors can recommend good advanced instructors in self-defense, like Rangemasters, Thunder Ranch, Vickers Tactical, Gunsite, and many others. Start with the fundamentals, and the rest will progress with practice and good instruction.
 
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I took the course many years ago as it was being offered at my range and figured it couldn’t hurt. I was already a seasoned and experienced shooter that shot weekly and expected nothing new. But what I discovered is that it was good to review the basics - and doing so actually tightened my groups a tad. YMMV.
 

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Hi, I would like to hear from anyone who has taken this course. I have owned my Springfield 1911 MilSpec for about 8 years. Fired about 2500 rounds at the range. Took a Defensive Handgun course about 5 years ago and learned a lot. I just want to get occasional training from a variety of sources to learn what I can and avoid developing bad habits.
Yes, I took that class late last millennium. Then a refresher of it to certify for teaching it, ~15yrs ago.

"NRA Basic Pistol" put my handgun skills on an upward trajectory. That class was the beginning for me to correct some self-taught bad practices. Well worthwhile if you and the instructor make it so. It is geared for being the 1st class a new pistol shooter takes. But several times I've done what it reads that you're planning: taking a less advanced class, to get new perspectives on the training covered.
 
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I am a member of a group that has been teaching this course since the mid 1970s. I joined about ten years ago (with 38 years of law enforcement history and LE firearms instructor certification for 28 years). We teach the NRA Basic Pistol Course from the NRA lesson plans. We also provide basic marksmanship training as part of our course. The students fire 200 rounds over four nights, one night a week. An additional night we have an attorney cover what you can do and cannot do within Wyoming State law. We provide this course four times per year coordinated through our local community college and our county sheriff's department.

We also offer the next level of training, personal protection in the home, again following the NRA lesson plans, twice a year. These students also shoot 200 rounds of the next level of training. We introduce concepts of defensive shooting with the reminder that we are introducing concepts that the students must follow up with individual practice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks to All who took the time to reply. Great input, very much appreciated. I am fine with a refresher on the basics, especially safety-related habits. I own firearms for the purpose of self-defense. A self-inflicted injury would be the ultimate failure, eh!
 

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Basics are always good. Maybe see if there is a self-defense instructor or course in your area you could take some training to sharpen yourself with. I suspect if you have that many rounds down range you may lose interest quickly with just the basics. I learn something valuable every time I take a different course. I took a self defense refresher just before the Cofu with a guy who was special forces then a LEO for 20 yrs. I had to really coax him to do it since he does not teach as a thing. His input was invaluable.
 

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We teach it at our range. (We also offer a lot of other NRA classes, non-NRA classes and private, one-on-one instruction and clinics).

As noted, it is very basic and is geared for new gun owners or folks who have never received any firearms handling training. It does include basic marksmanship fundamentals: grip, breathing, sight alignment and sight placement, and seated bench and standing firing positions (Isosceles and Weaver). It does give a sound foundation to build on or a good refresher for anyone who's perhaps a bit "rusty" or looking to identify some bad "habits" for correction. Pretty much any new handgun owner should take this course (or one very like it) unless they have some good friend or family member who can teach and mentor them in the basics.

IIRC, taking the basic pistol course is also a pre-requirement for the other NRA Basic Personal Protection in the Home, NRA Basic Personal Protection Outside the Home, and the NRA Defensive Pistol Courses.

These are all good, "basic" courses, but, like all such things, the proficiency and experience of the instructors is a factor in the "richness" of specific classes. All of the NRA courses follow very standardized curriculums and lesson plans, so you can expect at the least a very uniform presentation that meets the specified standards. They are not the "be all, end all" on the subjects covered, and are all really just intended to provide a good foundation to build later training upon.

Honestly, though, I wish our range master and facility owner required completion of the NRA Basic Pistol course for any of our CWP students that can't document previous, formal firearms training or instruction. We won't pass any CWP students who egregiously violate any safe handing rules, but the live fire range portion of our CWP course is very "regimented." It's pretty difficult to screw up bad enough to get a "no-go" based on a safety violation.)

(CWP course curriculum in our state, SC, has certain minimum required content, but the overall course design is open to each instructor. The instructors must submit their course lesson plans to the State Law Enforcement Division for review and approval before they, themselves, are certified as state-approved CWP instructors. However, the minimum requirements are very "minimal." Perhaps as they should be, but still...)

Anyway, the NRA Basic Pistol course is sound fundamental training.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Input regarding the background and style of the instructor are right on target. I have taken several courses at Trident Firearms Academy in Central California. Dan Gray and Gene Whisenand are outstanding instructors. I can never have too much training...or ammunition. :) I don't allow myself to get bored with the basics. Getting reinforcement via different instructors always results in me finding another opportunity to improve my shooting or at least builds confidence in my skills. Thanks for taking the time for making a thoughtful reply!
 
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