1911Forum banner
1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
79,852 Posts
Consider the cost of making molds and such. Remington discontinued the Nylon 66 in the late 1980s because the original tooling and molds were worn out, and it was decided that continued sales wouldn't be able to justify the cost to completely re-tool. As neat as the Nylon 66 is, it's a very dated design and as you've likely seen the values of existing examples haven't exactly gone through the roof. You can easily find a clean one without too much trouble for less than $500. The rifle still has its fans, but more from the point of nostalgia than anything else.

BTW from what I've been reading the Henry AR-7 isn't made very well, at least compared to the originals from decades past. However it's a pretty cheap design to begin with so I doubt to cost to tool up and make it again wasn't that great.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,776 Posts
I still have my Mohawk Brown, but it doesn't get out much.
Having to completely remove the magazine tube to reload is just funky.
 
  • Like
Reactions: zach141b

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I've got a Seneca Green one going on 50 years now, and it's definitely not been a safe queen. Not much original finish left on it at this point but, the stock has held up well. It rode for many years in my truck's toolbox and now sits in the house ready for varmint action if needed. Still grab it today when I take a walk down to the creek. It's been a fun little rifle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
Since we have mentioned several niche .22 rifles here, I will bring up my favorite. It is the Browning SA .22 rifle. I have two of them. They are well designed high quality wood stocked rifles that can even be broken down for easy carry. They are simply beautifully little rifles.
Air gun Trigger Wood Revolver Shotgun
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
988 Posts
The first gun that I ever owned was a Seneca Green Nylon 66. I lusted for this thing for several years until I finally wore my parents down and they let me spend my paper route money on a used one from our local LGS. I spent my youth shooting the heck out of that thing. I did something with it just about every day for years. It was my most prized possession.

One day, after having reached an age when I would start thinking about such things, I decided to clean it (yeah, I know, but I was a kid). I pulled it apart for the first time after I can't even guess how many thousands of rounds had been through it. It had as much black sludge packed in there as could possibly be made to fit. I don't think that you could pack another hundredth of an ounce of sludge in there if you tried. I dismantled it and cleaned it cat whisker clean fore and aft. I put it back together, and that gun that I don't think ever malfunctioned prior to this, never emptied another mag full without at least one, if not a couple stoppages. Go figure. Looking back, it is a pretty complicated gun to take apart and put back together. I probably put something back wrong, if the truth be known. But, at the time, it made me very leary of cleaning guns. I got over that, eventually, thankfully.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I was enamored by the Nylon 66 back in the day but, quite frankly, I couldn't bring myself to buy a "plastic" gun. Heck, back then I thought my Crosman PowerMaster BB gun was pretty cool and it was built like a tank but the thought of shooting a real gun made of plastic just didn't appeal to me back then.

Maybe other manufacturer's thought they couldn't compete with Remington's Nylon 66 because it had such a cult following.

When I came of age to buy my own rifle I bought a Ruger 10/22. I've seen a few Nylon 66's in my local gun shop and looked at a couple but I just can't get myself to buy one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
988 Posts
I was enamored by the Nylon 66 back in the day but, quite frankly, I couldn't bring myself to buy a "plastic" gun. Heck, back then I thought my Crosman PowerMaster BB gun was pretty cool and it was built like a tank but the thought of shooting a real gun made of plastic just didn't appeal to me back then.

Maybe other manufacturer's thought they couldn't compete with Remington's Nylon 66 because it had such a cult following.

When I came of age to buy my own rifle I bought a Ruger 10/22. I've seen a few Nylon 66's in my local gun shop and looked at a couple but I just can't get myself to buy one.
I hear you. Back when I got mine, it was the only plastic gun that anyone had ever seen, or thought about. I spent my days telling detractors (there were more than a few over the years) that it merely represented the way of the future. As a twelve year old I predicted that there would come a day when plastic would be common on guns. I guess I was one of the pioneer plastic gun owners.

Fast forward to adulthood and the eighties. Plastic guns did indeed start hitting the shelves. You couldn't then, and you could not now give me one of the foolish things as a gift. I totally despise plastic in guns. Won't buy one if it has even a piece of plastic in it, unless I can switch it out to steel with a aftermarket part.

Our view of the world, and our thoughts about things in it changes and we grow older, I guess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
461 Posts
I was 12 years old when I had earned enough money cutting grass to buy my first new .22 rifle. I had my heart set on a nylon 66, but when I compared it to the Remington 572 BDL sitting next to it the decision was made. The gorgeous wood sold me. FWIW, that was over 50 years ago and I still have not bought a plastic gun. And the 572 still works as new! Danny
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
There was a clone made in the '90's, but it didn't sell well. My recollection was it was made on original Remington equipment and were very good quality, but no one wanted a Nylon 66 that wasn't made by Remington.

The Nylon 66 as a concept comfortably ran its course. It was a very cool idea when it came out and it was a very cool .22 for many years. But now you can produce a much higher quality .22 for much less money, and the Nylon 66's never were barn burners for accuracy. So the only real market for them would be retro minded people. Now retro sometimes does sell, but I'm not sure about that one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Being without a .22 rifle for many years, I've begun to think that I'd like to get back into that again. I traded a N66 for a 10/22 twenty or so years ago and regretted it almost from the get go. Compared to the Remington, I unexpectedly hated the Ruger and got rid of it a few years later. As usual for me, I want what I don't have and don't appreciate what I do. Thanks for the replies. I'll be on the lookout at my local gun shows.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
79,852 Posts
I wanted one as a teenager back in the 1980s, but I had to wait until about 15 years ago when I finally found a clean one at a LGS. Honestly it sees very little use, but it's such a neat little rifle I intend to hang onto it. Super lightweight and reliable. Downsides are the complicated disassembly (definitely DO NOT take it apart beyond the field-strip level), the fact that you have to count rounds as you load them in the magazine, and most of all the fact that mounting a scope is a complete waste of time due to the fact that you can literally flex the entire rifle if you hold it too tight.
Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Gun accessory Composite material
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Top