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Is there a reason that no manufacturer has cloned the Nylon 66? I remember seeing what is now called the Henry AR7 survival rifle available from other makers going back decades.
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Consider the cost of making molds and such. Remington discontinued the Nylon 66 in the late 1980s because the original tooling and molds were worn out, and it was decided that continued sales wouldn't be able to justify the cost to completely re-tool. As neat as the Nylon 66 is, it's a very dated design and as you've likely seen the values of existing examples haven't exactly gone through the roof. You can easily find a clean one without too much trouble for less than $500. The rifle still has its fans, but more from the point of nostalgia than anything else.

BTW from what I've been reading the Henry AR-7 isn't made very well, at least compared to the originals from decades past. However it's a pretty cheap design to begin with so I doubt to cost to tool up and make it again wasn't that great.
 

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I wanted one as a teenager back in the 1980s, but I had to wait until about 15 years ago when I finally found a clean one at a LGS. Honestly it sees very little use, but it's such a neat little rifle I intend to hang onto it. Super lightweight and reliable. Downsides are the complicated disassembly (definitely DO NOT take it apart beyond the field-strip level), the fact that you have to count rounds as you load them in the magazine, and most of all the fact that mounting a scope is a complete waste of time due to the fact that you can literally flex the entire rifle if you hold it too tight.
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The first gun that I ever owned was a Seneca Green Nylon 66. I lusted for this thing for several years until I finally wore my parents down and they let me spend my paper route money on a used one from our local LGS. I spent my youth shooting the heck out of that thing. I did something with it just about every day for years. It was my most prized possession.

One day, after having reached an age when I would start thinking about such things, I decided to clean it (yeah, I know, but I was a kid). I pulled it apart for the first time after I can't even guess how many thousands of rounds had been through it. It had as much black sludge packed in there as could possibly be made to fit. I don't think that you could pack another hundredth of an ounce of sludge in there if you tried. I dismantled it and cleaned it cat whisker clean fore and aft. I put it back together, and that gun that I don't think ever malfunctioned prior to this, never emptied another mag full without at least one, if not a couple stoppages. Go figure. Looking back, it is a pretty complicated gun to take apart and put back together. I probably put something back wrong, if the truth be known. But, at the time, it made me very leary of cleaning guns. I got over that, eventually, thankfully.
The one I bought actually had serious functioning issues when I first went to the range with it. Puzzled, I went home and started taking it apart..... and found several pieces inside the stock that were actually held in place with masking tape. The previous owner took it completely apart but couldn't figure out how to reassemble it, which I assume was why he sold it. Fortunately there weren't any missing pieces to the jigsaw puzzle and I figured out how to put it back together again correctly. It functioned just fine afterwards.
 

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Remington Nylon 11 bolt-action. There was also the Nylon 10 (single-shot) and Nylon 12 (tubular magazine).

Even more funky was the Nylon 76, a lever-action rifle. All of these except for the semi-auto Nylon 66 failed to catch on and were discontinued after a short time, and are quire rare today.
 
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A few years ago I finally bought a 10/22, which I'd wanted for years. By the time I got mine, a plastic stock was about the only choice and, for a purely functional firearm, makes perfect sense.
My 10/22 that I've had since a teenager came with the birch stock. After a few years it was beat up so bad I refinished it. A few years after that it split so I replaced it. Then that ended up getting beat-up as well. Now the rifle wears an OEM Ruger plastic stock. Not pretty, but a helluva lot more practical.

The ad I remember for the Nylon 66 is that guy that shot 100,000 wooden blocks thrown into the air without a malfunction.
That was Tom Frye, who was an exhibition shooter and a Remington employee. As part of the public release of the Nylon 66 he duplicated Al Topperwien's old stunt of shooting at hand-thrown 2 1/4" wooden blocks. Tom shot at 100,010 of them with only six misses. He used three Nylon 66 rifles during that event, and none malfunctioned.
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