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I still have the Nylon 66 Apache Black that I got for my 12th birthday (1967). It's the one with the black stock, chrome receiver and chrome barrel. Mine's still in excellent condition even after so many rounds and so many days in the woods it still shoots great.

Is the '66 a target rifle? ... no ... but it's great plinker for the range and its light weight makes it a great gun to carry all day walking the hills. I wouldn't trade mine for a box of puppies.
 

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The first gun that I ever owned was a Seneca Green Nylon 66. I lusted for this thing for several years until I finally wore my parents down and they let me spend my paper route money on a used one from our local LGS. I spent my youth shooting the heck out of that thing. I did something with it just about every day for years. It was my most prized possession.

One day, after having reached an age when I would start thinking about such things, I decided to clean it (yeah, I know, but I was a kid). I pulled it apart for the first time after I can't even guess how many thousands of rounds had been through it. It had as much black sludge packed in there as could possibly be made to fit. I don't think that you could pack another hundredth of an ounce of sludge in there if you tried. I dismantled it and cleaned it cat whisker clean fore and aft. I put it back together, and that gun that I don't think ever malfunctioned prior to this, never emptied another mag full without at least one, if not a couple stoppages. Go figure. Looking back, it is a pretty complicated gun to take apart and put back together. I probably put something back wrong, if the truth be known. But, at the time, it made me very leary of cleaning guns. I got over that, eventually, thankfully.
The one I bought actually had serious functioning issues when I first went to the range with it. Puzzled, I went home and started taking it apart..... and found several pieces inside the stock that were actually held in place with masking tape. The previous owner took it completely apart but couldn't figure out how to reassemble it, which I assume was why he sold it. Fortunately there weren't any missing pieces to the jigsaw puzzle and I figured out how to put it back together again correctly. It functioned just fine afterwards.
 

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Remington Nylon 11 bolt-action. There was also the Nylon 10 (single-shot) and Nylon 12 (tubular magazine).

Even more funky was the Nylon 76, a lever-action rifle. All of these except for the semi-auto Nylon 66 failed to catch on and were discontinued after a short time, and are quire rare today.
 
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I got to handle a Nylon 76, only lever action Remington made, very cool rifle with a short throw like the Browning BLR. Guy was asking $1,200 for it & I couldn't do that. I shoot my 66 several times a year, I use the clear loading tubes so there's no counting bullets loading on the range, just dump 'em in & go. 66 will also load single round very easily, just lay the round on the side of the bolt & cycle it-that's how we shot 'em in Boy Scouts. Still very popular in Alaska I'm told as they never need lube & won't freeze up, great survival rifle-light, plenty accurate, unaffected by weather, & more rugged than you could imagine.
 

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Thank you @dsk! I would not have guessed from the pictures the stock was nylon. But I did think the end of the bolt looked lot like the "beehive" on the back of my Remington 513T bolt... Danny
I have a 512 and a 511, and I think the Nylon 11 is pretty much the same action. Different disassembly though. You have to drive out a pin at the front receiver ring, separate action from barrel. Lift out the action, the barrel slides out through the front of the stock.

No wonder they weren't all that popular.
 

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The first gun that I ever owned was a Seneca Green Nylon 66. I lusted for this thing for several years until I finally wore my parents down and they let me spend my paper route money on a used one from our local LGS. I spent my youth shooting the heck out of that thing. I did something with it just about every day for years. It was my most prized possession.

One day, after having reached an age when I would start thinking about such things, I decided to clean it (yeah, I know, but I was a kid). I pulled it apart for the first time after I can't even guess how many thousands of rounds had been through it. It had as much black sludge packed in there as could possibly be made to fit. I don't think that you could pack another hundredth of an ounce of sludge in there if you tried. I dismantled it and cleaned it cat whisker clean fore and aft. I put it back together, and that gun that I don't think ever malfunctioned prior to this, never emptied another mag full without at least one, if not a couple stoppages. Go figure. Looking back, it is a pretty complicated gun to take apart and put back together. I probably put something back wrong, if the truth be known. But, at the time, it made me very leary of cleaning guns. I got over that, eventually, thankfully.
I used to spend a lot of time at the beach. Have the skin cancer to prove it. Did a lot of fishing in the surf. My biggest reel was a Penn. The thing about salt water is no matter how much time spent cleaning the reels always seem to get frozen when you go to use them several months later. Took that Penn reel apart and I'll be damned I could not put it back together to save my soul. Put all the parts in a box, mailed it to Penn with a note that said "If you'll put this back together I promise I will never take it apart again!" They did, at no charge. They probably had a good laugh at that rube from Texas.
 

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I always liked the lines of Remington autos, they just seem to be more eye catching than others.
That's why I went with the Rem 552 BDL Speedmaster. I don't mind a tube fed 22. And it will eat any kind of 22 shell you put in it. I picked one up (new in box) a few years ago. It's so pretty, I hate to take it into the woods. LOL
 

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My recollection is that there were abuse ads for the 66 - picking it out of the water in the bottom of a canoe sticks in my mind. Possibly others I've forgot.
I don't remember those ads in particular, but I do remember seeing the Nylon 66 advertised in Boys' Life when it was first introduced, and we (my Boy Scout chums and I) were pretty excited and impressed; we thought it was pretty innovative and "modern"; I don't think the term "state of the art" had yet entered the lexicon, but it would have described how we thought of the Nylon 66.

I would have been happy to have one, but I never owned one. For years my only .22 rifle was a Winchester 69A, with a walnut stock; I still have it, and it's beautiful and extremely accurate.

A few years ago I finally bought a 10/22, which I'd wanted for years. By the time I got mine, a plastic stock was about the only choice and, for a purely functional firearm, makes perfect sense.
 
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Boy's Life! Hadn't thought of that in a very long time. Some great days to be a boy! Today, we'd be in deep trouble. I can recall teachers in grade school asking who had a sharp knife, and most of us did!
'Interesting that you'd mention the knives, which we all carried; Yup, even in school! Nobody freaked out over a kid having a pocketknife. After our Boy Scout meetings, a group of us would "bop down to the Village" (NYC's Greenwich Village) or to Chinatown, and there were blocks where we'd take out our knives and go down the street with our open Scout knives in our hands!
 
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F.I.E. used to make a copy of the Nylon 66.
I never had a 66 but I did have a Nylon 77 (same as 66 but detachable mag). I didn’t much care for it so I sold it at a gun show.
The ad I remember for the Nylon 66 is that guy that shot 100,000 wooden blocks thrown into the air without a malfunction.
 

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Is there a reason that no manufacturer has cloned the Nylon 66? I remember seeing what is now called the Henry AR7 survival rifle available from other makers going back decades.
I've got one from 'way back. The thing I remember most is a GUNSMITH telling my dad, "Never take it apart! I have to look at the book to put it back together..." That could be the reason.
 

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Boy's Life! Hadn't thought of that in a very long time. Some great days to be a boy! Today, we'd be in deep trouble. I can recall teachers in grade school asking who had a sharp knife, and most of us did!
Pocket knife was, and still is, a tool. Haven't been able to walk without one since my childhood in the '50's. Air travel is awful...
 

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They were advertised as a trap line gun and I bought one just for that purpose. Mine was pretty much impervious to the weather. It was not all the accurate but accurate enough for a trap line gun.
The ad at the time that caught my eye was exactly the trap line approach…I remember the picture of a guy climbing up an embankment in the rain with a ‘66 in his hand…I thought it was the coolest rifle ever…I was about 14. Finally got one (and a ‘77 - the magazine fed version)
about 15 years ago…absolutely love the ‘66. The ‘77 is also a great and fun gun - when it functions. Msgs are the problem. All I can find are cheap plastic crap that don’t work no matter what I feed ‘em.
But, oh, that ‘66…she’s a winner.
 
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