1911Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recently loaded a batch of .45 ACP using 230 grain Hornady XTP HP's to an OAL of 1.25". The XTP's shoulder is a bit long and it contacts the rifling, jamming the pistol. I've found that the proper OAL should be 1.20".

I also found that while they passed in my case gauge, had I also tested them in the barrel, I could have avoided this.

I've already taper crimped them so I'm wondering if it's safe to reseat them to the proper OAL.

Any advice on this would be appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
800 Posts
Neck tension.

In question is sufficient neck tension, reseating bullet could have a effect on neck tension. Something to check for. If it were me after reseating, chamber a few to check neck tension against setback.

dc.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,889 Posts
It's safe enough, whether you have issues doing so really depends on how much crimp you applied. Personally, I wouldn't have a problem re-seating them, but I would use them as practice rounds, and not for self-defense or competition purposes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the quick replies. I'll definitely test a few and check neck tension.

I loaded these so I'd have some cheap HP's to run through a new pistol but they failed in all three 1911 barrels (two Colts and a Metro Arms). As long as I don't have a setback issue, they'll be fine for that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I certainly don't consider Hornady XTP's cheap bullets. :)
They're definitely not cheap bullets but my reloads are a heck of a lot cheaper than buying 100 factory rounds. I'd be in the poor house pretty quickly if I had to pay those prices.

On the other hand, factory loads would most likely function in my pistols. :)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,388 Posts
I'd reseat them without a second thought. The chances of losing case neck tension are tiny.
But to be prudent you should check the reseated cartridges just like you would inspect any other ammo you load.
One assumes you crimped normally, not some super duper crimp half way into bullet diameter.
:)


I know you've learned your lesson, I won't rub it in.
In addition to checking in your chamber,
load 5 and actually shoot them before proceeding with a new load.
That gives you a complete evaluation prior to loading many more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks, Nick.

This was my first time loading XTP's. I've reloaded countless 230 gr ball and 200 gr LSWC with no problems and have always relied on my case gauge. I did one of the worst things we can do as reloaders: I got complacent.

While I do feel that I've learned my lesson, I'm always willing to listen to others with more experience. I've learned a lot from the fine folks on this forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,973 Posts
As Nick said... if you over crimp and then push the bullet farther you'll push lead above the rim and you'll be tossin' all them bullets..

I just went through a bunch of 308... had been running FL dies.. figured I'd go to neck only... after prepping 100 and loading 60 I chamber checked some... No Go..!! Been pulling and FL sizing...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,744 Posts
No deeper than you will need to seat (reseat) these bullets I doubt you will have any issues. The case below the bullets present position has not been expanded excessively and should apply enough neck tension. That being said I'd follow snow's advice and use the reseated round for practice.


Grumpy
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,889 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,913 Posts
I also found that while they passed in my case gauge, had I also tested them in the barrel, I could have avoided this.
If I had a nickel for every one of these or similar statements I've seen in various reloading forums, I could buy a new Les Baer. A lot of this revolves around not understanding what the numbers in loading manuals really mean but that's a subject for another thread.

It's never a smart thing to load a whole batch, whatever that is, without knowing if they actually fit and feed in your gun but it's usually not an oops you make twice. This is especially so if you now have to pull the bullets plus resize and expand the cases. Before you just push all the bullets in deeper, try 14 and see if you have any setback issues before you do the rest. No sense in repeating the "whole batch" oops twice.

Incidentally, if your gun has a custom or semi-custom barrel, I would have a 'smith confirm that both the chamber and especially the leade were cut to final dimensions.

Just for Sh*ts and giggles, how did you determine that 1.250" was the correct OAL for your gun and find out later that you were fifty thousandths off?

:):)



Bruce
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,032 Posts
As others have said, you should have no problem seating the bullet deeper but adjust slowly to find the correct OAL.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Just for Sh*ts and giggles, how did you determine that 1.250" was the correct OAL for your gun and find out later that you were fifty thousandths off?

:):)



Bruce
It's actually 1.230". I was looking at what I'd written on the load info sticker and apparently I can't read my own writing. The info came from a friends Hornady handbook (which I've since returned so I can't say which edition). The recommendation to seat to 1.200" came from a website where others had the same problem. I know to take that with a grain of salt and only seat to an OAL that works in my pistol.

I've seated 10 cartridges to an OAL of 1.210" and they pass a drop test in all three of my barrels. I'm going to test these on my next trip to the range before I do the rest of the batch.

Thanks to everyone who responded.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,311 Posts
I'm a little late to this party, but I'm going to offer up what's sort of a different opinion. I realize that the topic can explode when it's brought up, but my personal opinion is that the purpose of a taper crimp is simply to remove the case mouth flare from the belling operation. It's not to help hold the bullet. Therefore, I only bell cases enough to allow the bullets to get started seating. The area between where the case starts to flare and the bottom of the bullet is what's going to provide the case tension on the bullet when it's seated. The area above where the case starts to flare does not provide tension on the bullet. Taper crimping just makes the bullet wall and inside case wall parallel, but it does not add significant tension to help hold the bullet. In this particular example, seating the bullet deeper in to the case should increase the total tension between the bullet and case because there is tension over a greater area. So my answer is that not only is seating the bullet deeper not a problem, it should actually help decrease the odds of getting a setback.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
---------------------------------------------------------

I'd reseat them without a second thought. The chances of losing case neck tension are tiny.
But to be prudent you should check the reseated cartridges just like you would inspect any other ammo you load.
One assumes you crimped normally, not some super duper crimp half way into bullet diameter.:mummy:
I know you've learned your lesson, I won't rub it in.
In addition to checking in your chamber,
load 5 and actually shoot them before proceeding with a new load.
That gives you a complete evaluation prior to loading many more.

I've never practiced the " super-duper " crimp . that's a good thing - right ? :hrm:

















Yep, pretty sure ........................................................
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
690 Posts
Good thread, I have a bunch of Hornady 230gr XTP HPs that I want to load and it sounds like I should have a 1911 barrel on the bench next to the machine.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top