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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
24 hours of violence
Police have found no connection in Friday incidents
By Tim Hrenchir
The Capital-Journal
Published Tuesday, January 23, 2007:

"...Police declined to name the person they were looking for in connection with that case, or the name of a would-be robber shot just before 9 p.m. Friday [1/19/2006] at Payco Phillips 66, 2525 S.W. 29th.

Payco Phillips 66 owner Dean Yee was working when two youths entered. One pointed a gun at Yee, 39, and demanded money. Yee hesitated, and the youth demanded money a second time while continuing to point the gun at him, Gish said.

Meanwhile, Gish said, store customer Michael Mah, 57, drew a handgun and told the would-be robber to drop his weapon. Mah then shot the man once.:rock:

The shooter has an Oklahoma permit to carry a concealed weapon. Gish said Kansas Attorney General Paul Morrison concluded this month that Kansas will accept the validity of concealed-carry permits issued in 22 other states, including Oklahoma, that require permit owners to meet requirements similar to those mandated by the state of Kansas.

Gish said the gun used by the would-be robber was found to be stolen.

He said the second teenager fled and was last seen running south on S.W. Randolph. :rock: Police haven't arrested that youth, who was described as a Hispanic male about 18 years of age who wore a black coat, white T-shirt, blue jeans and a red do-rag.

Kansas Sen. Phil Journey, R-Haysville and author of the law that took effect Jan. 1 allowing the issuance of concealed-carry permits, said the incident proves permit holders are capable of using lawful and deadly force in a reasonable way to protect other individuals.:rock:

"Hopefully this will put other criminals and thugs on notice that Kansas is a different state today than it was just 20 days ago," Journey said Monday.":rock:

I am unaware of whether any Kansans have actually received their CHL/CCW permits. But in less than one month the law did exactly what it was intended.

I lived in Topeka most of my life. I was LE in KS in another county- as a historical note, one year Topkeka almost won murder captial of America with almost 100 murders for a City of about 130,000.

BTW- I've often seen the "what would you do?" posts on the forum describing this exact situation, I guess Mah's answer is shoot the $h!+-bird!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1763839/posts

Kansas ' Recognition of other states' Conceal Carry Licenses
KansasAG.com ^ | 1/6/07 | Kansas Attorney General

[http://www.ksag.org/Concealed_Weapon/Recognition_of_other_states.htm] - doesn't work any longer

Kansas ' Recognition of other states' Conceal Carry Licenses

On July 1, 2006 Kansas joined 47 other states allowing qualified citizens to carry handguns in a concealed manner. In addition to licensing qualified residents, the Kansas Personal and Family Protection Act (KPFPA) granted authority to the Attorney General to determine which other states' concealed carry licenses would be recognize in the state of Kansas, and to authorize a licensed non-resident to carry a concealed handgun within the borders of Kansas. The KPFPA, found in S.B. 418 (as amended by H.B. 2118), will be codified as K.S.A. §75-7c01 et seq.

According to K.S.A. § 75-7c03(c), the determination of the states recognized is accomplished through an “equal to or greater than” standard. The Attorney General determined that if a state's concealed carry laws contains the following requirements, that state meets the “equal to or greater than” standard;

the state requires a national fingerprint-based background check on its applicants;
a pending arrest/charge for a disqualifying act would subject an applicant/licensee to denial/suspension pending the outcome of that arrest/charge;
formal training on legal issues and the safe handling of firearms is required prior to licensure;
a live fire exercise must be completed to determine an applicants firearm handling and shooting capabilities; and
that the applicants must be at least 21 years of age at the time of application.
Based on a review of the applicable state laws and conversations with officials from each of the respective states, the following 22 states satisfy the requirements listed above:

Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
Colorado
Florida
Hawaii
Kentucky
Louisiana
Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri
Nebraska
Nevada
New Jersey
New Mexico
North Carolina
Ohio
Oklahoma
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
West Virginia
There is one (1) additional state Wyoming that is pending a determination of whether it will meet the criteria for recognition.

A review of applicable state laws and discussions with state officials from each of the respective states, the following 24 states do not meet the minimum requirements as outlined above:

Alabama - Does not meet age, training, live fire, or pending charges requirements
California - Does not meet the age requirement
Connecticut - Does not have a live fire requirement
Delaware - Does not meet age requirement
Georgia - Does not have either training or live fire requirements
Idaho - Does not have a live fire requirement
Indiana - Does not meet age requirement
Iowa - Does not meet age requirement
Maine - Does not meet age requirement
Maryland - Does not meet age requirement
Massachusetts - Does not have a formal shooting requirement
Mississippi - Does not have a training requirement
Montana - Does not meet age requirement
New Hampshire - Does not meet age or background requirements
New York - Does not meet training requirement
North Dakota - Does not meet age requirement
Oregon - Does not meet the live fire requirement
Pennsylvania - Does not meet training or live fire requirements
Rhode Island - Does not meet training requirement
South Dakota - Does not meet age requirement
Utah - Does not meet live fire requirement
Vermont - Essentially, no requirements at all (no license is issued)
Virginia - Does not meet live fire requirement
Washington - Does not meet training or live fire requirements
 

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This seems to be an answer to this thread:

Protecting someone else's life?

The scenario that went down in Kansas was very similar to the one presented in the above thread, except the robber didn't shoot first.
 
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