1911Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
817 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Turret or progressive?? I know how the progressive machine works. I'd like to know the procedure to use the turret presses. Do you first go through all your shells and resize and de-prime,install new primer, then move the turret and then expand and fill shell with powder, then move turret again and set bullet and crimp? Or is each shell loaded one at a time? I've saved my money up and can now almost get the Dillon 550 progressive, but I'm not going to be shooting 5 to 10,000 rds. per year. I'm probably looking at 2-5,000 per year, right now. If I go turret, it's going to be the Lee, if I go progressive, Dillon 550. Even if I go Turret, I'm still going to have to invest in the primer tool, the powder measure, and God only knows what else.
Let me add one more item here. I'm not going to have a lot of time to sit down and load 200 at a time if the turret take a lot of time to provide the finished product. With the progressive, I can leave it set up, and come back the next evening and knock out 10 rds or 500 rds depending on time. I gues what I'm trying to say here is that I don't want to have half completed shells setting around until I can get back to them.

[This message has been edited by ScottsGT (edited 10-15-2001).]
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,948 Posts
The Lee Turret Press is probably the quickest "semi-progressive" press available. I actually removed the auto-index mechanism that rotates the dies with each stroke of the handle. This way, it allows me to use one die function individually for all my brass - I like to decap and size all my brass first. Once sized (and hand primed), I then only have two dies to worry about switching back and forth between. Of course, the turret press will allow you to completely load 1 cartridge at a time if you desire.

I agree with your decision to get a hand primer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
I say get the 550 if you can afford it. I guess some folks get into reloading so they can doodle with the components, but I'm into it so I can shoot more. If time is important, the Dillon gets two votes.

Since primers come 100 to a box I load in multiples of 100. It just isn't worth the hassle trying to load some other multiple. You open a primer box and load it. Got some more time? Load 100 more.

I didn't load and burn 10k+ rounds per year until I got the reloader that could do the work. And it ain't like I'm unemployed or got nothing else to do. After the first 4 pulls on the 550 you're making a completed round every pull. How much *more work* are you gonna do on a turret press? I've got better things to do than pulling a lever over and over (plus a hand priming step?) to make one shot.

Of course, if tinkering around with reloading components and steps pleases you and you don't want the fun to be over too fast, by all means get a turret press. By golly they work and they still allow you the time to develop that personal relationship with each and every round.


The only thing I reget about getting the 550 is that if I'd known how good it was gonna be I'd have bought the 650 instead.


[This message has been edited by WalterMitty (edited 10-15-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,845 Posts
A hand primer is the way to go with the Lee press.

Although I use a separate press to size cases, you can easily either "half-stroke" the press to keep it from indexing, or jusr do like Shane and remove the "thingy" as that only takes a second.

After you have primed cases, use a second turret (not necessary, but nice) set up with your expander, seating, and crimp die for semi-progressive loading. Fairly relaxed loading can result in 200 per hour and you could load here and there as you wished. I would dump any powder in the measure between sessions though.

I've hit 350 per hour with this machine, but it's not much fun. 250 per hour suits me just fine and since I load often I can keep up with my shooting with no problem.

With the Lyman or RCBS turret press, then you would be basically batch loading and just avoiding having to change dies. My Lyman turret press is loaded up with rifle sizing dies just for that purpose.

I'm wierd in that I rarely use my Dillon 650 unless I'm desperate for ammo. I think I'm of the type who wants to become "one with his ammo".



[This message has been edited by Walking Point (edited 10-15-2001).]
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top