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Discussion Starter #1
I bought the Otis cleaning system with the Loaded coupon. The instructions stress the importance of having a tight patch. I've read the instructions, visited their web site and watched the video. I'm using the larger of the 2 slotted tips and pinching the patch at the 5:30 position as per the web site to create the largest 'cone'.

I haven't found a way to use the supplied patches to form a tight patch in my .45, other than wrapping one around the bronze brush. Not as tight as a rod and jag, nor even as tight as a .45 BoreSnake. Any techniques for using this product?
 

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I'm wondering the same thing you are. I "won" one of those Otis kits as sort of a door prize at the last match of our season, last Sunday. I eagerly read the instruction booklet (no video provided) and set for to clean my guns. I followed their directions as best I could (IMO it's not a very well written "how to" booklet). They say to use a two patch thickness to get a tight patch. Using the "B" slot and a 6 o'clock pinch created a pretty tight patch. At least it took a lot of effort to pull it through the barrel. After each pass with the patch you have to "rearrange" the patch on the slotted tip to have a clean portion of the patch. They say each patch will give six clean patch passes, but it seemed to me after about two passes the patch was used up. Then, according to instructions, after a couple of solvent patch passes, I pulled the wire brush through the barrel a couple of times. Maybe if you're shooting jacketed bullets this technique may work to clean your barrel, but it didn't do anything to remove the leading in my barrel from my lead bullet reloads. I gave up and gave the barrel a couple of passes with my usual "rod" having some ChoreBoy strands wrapped around an undersized brush and the barrel was gleaming clean.

I'm not quite ready to give up on the Otis System, but I'm pretty disappointed with it right now. And the kit I got only had enough patches for about 5 or 6 cleanings. Have to order additional patches from Otis at a cost higher than normal cleaning patches.

Not sure if I just don't understand how to use the system effectively, or if the system just doesn't work any better than the conventional rod, jag, & brush system.

Let me know if you figure out how to use it effectively.

Good shooting.....Rod.
 

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I find the system works extremely well. For .45, I use the thicker panoply patches, and need only one for a tight patch. I do three uses per side of the patch, which is why they say six (three uses per side). the only thing is that the panoply patches have two different surfaces, so I may or may not use all three uses on both sides.

To get the tight patch, you insert the jag, pinch at the spot appropriate for the caliber you are cleaning, and pull that pinched part back through the jag. Tthen sort of brush the whole thing in the opposite direction from the cable, and you have it.

It sounds and looks a whole lot harder than it really is once you see what to do, and once you do get it, it works great. I threw out all my conventional rods and never looked back.

Ben
 

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Ben,

Tell me a little more about the panoply patches that you mention. I'm not familiar with them. Is that a brand name or a type of patch? Where can I get them?

Another question for you satisfied users. The instruction booklet say to "twist" the patch (and also the brush) to clean the chamber corners. Do you do this? I've not had much success trying to "twist" a flexible cable.

Thanks for the tip about using three patches on .45acp. :)

Good shooting.....Rod.
 

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Rod, the panoply patches are made by Otis. They are thikcer thatn the regular patch, so you do not need to double them up. They cannot be used on the smaller calibers, by the way. One side is rougher, for more agressive cleaning, and the other side is softer. Because they are not intended to be used on small calibers, they have only one set of three holes in thiem, instead of two sets of three like the standard patches.

Yes, I do twist to clean the chamber, but I know what you mean. At first, it seems as if the cable just twists and the patch does not. Keep at it--twist that sucker like you mean it, and it works fine.

I guess there is a bit of a learning curve with this kit, and one might say there is no need to do so for something as basic as cleaning, but I think the convenience and performance of this kit is worth a little bit of effort to get used to the way it works.

BTW, nothing against Otis's CLP, but I do use my kits with FP-10, which I really like as well.

Good luck--let me know if I can be of more help.

Oh, one last thing, Rod. There is no video tape provided with the kit. It is a very short video you watch on their web site. I found it a bit helpful, not completely so, but worth the time to go see.

Ben
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Ben,

Thanks for the information.

It seems to me that Otis could easily make some type of jag or slotted attachment for larger calibers that would prevent having to use 3 patches.

In fact, in about 5 minutes I made a system out of a 00 size rubber stopper. I drilled a hole in it (but you could also buy one somewhere pre-drilled), cut it so the diameter was almost the same size as the .45 bore, and threaded a piece of nylon rope through it. I put a hole in a SINGLE normal patch, threaded it on the cord, and pull it through the barrel. It's tighter than anything I've achieved with the Otis kit, and I can recut the stopper to any tightness I want. The only issue I have is whether the cord might get embedded with crud that could scratch the barrel.

I'll use the Otis bore brush but will have to experiment with the patches. If I can't get a better result than my homemade solution, why use the expensive Otis patches?
 

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I have been using the Otis kits for a while and I love them. Yes you do need to double up on the patches to get a tight fit but they work really well and minimize the possibility of damage from a rod. FWIW, it's not nesessary to use only the Otis patches. Just use your regular cotton patches and cut a small slit as in the Otis patches. Works great and you can use all those bulk-bought patches. I still use my normal solvents and lubes instead of the Otis branded stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
If I can't get a better result than my homemade solution, why use the expensive Otis patches?
I misspoke. I meant 'use the Otis system'. Their patch doesn't seem to be any different other than the hole. The Otis panaply patches are supposed to have different scrubbing characteristics on opposite sides but I don't see it on the patches in the kit. They may be a different story...

By the way, the video referred to is at:
http://www.otisgun.com/instr_videos.html (2MB)
 

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Ben & others,

Thanks for all the really good information. This is a prime example of why I keep coming to the 1911Forum website. The opportunity for learning is endless.

I believe in the concept of "pulling" through the barrel, rather than pushing, so I'm going to continue on my Otis "learning curve". And, I also use FP-10 on the Otis patches. :)

Thanks again guys, and good shooting to all.

Rod.
 

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Considering how short short a 1911's barrel is, what's the dificulty at pushing a brush or jag and patch through the barrel? Why mess with all this other stuff?
Just wondering smity
 
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