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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read several posts where people here advocate removing the screw entirely on a defense gun...for some Murphy protection.
I'm leaning towards this...and want to know about any possible mechanical problems this would cause. Some have said that some beavertail engagement areas are too relieved, thus requiring the use of an overtravel screw.
Thanks for any insight.
 

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I guess what they're saying is that absent an OT screw sometimes the grip safety acts as a trigger stop. I think some of the old-timers set them up that way on purpose and I can't see anything wrong with it except that the trigger bow is a bit delicate, and theoretically anyway I'd think a person could distort it by pulling the trigger real hard; it would tend to compress the bow.

But there are a few things that can be a prob if there's too much OT. Most guns without an OT stop don't seem to suffer from these but some do--

The trigger can travel far enough back that the bow's rear section, at the bottom, will touch the sear spring and lift it off the sear. Result: the sear is not pushed into engagement with the hammer even though the sear has been "disconnected" from the trigger-- result of the result, the hammer will not stay cocked and would either follow or the gun would run away on you-- I don't really know as the few cases of this I've experienced were on the bench and not on the range. This phenomenon is why some triggers have the rear section of the bow chamfered off at the bottom. Another fix would be to bend the sear spring such that it sorta goes out and comes back in, missing the trigger bow.

Another prob I've seen is where the trigger movement winds up being stopped by the disconnector binding. I've seen a lot of guns where if you were to retract the slide with the trigger pulled fairly hard, it will be stopped on the forward stroke when it touches the disconnector tip-- because with the trigger pulled the disconnector is bound solid. The trigger is pushing the bottom of it rearward, it's pivoting in the middle on the sear pin, and up at the top it's trying to rock in the disconnector hole but can't. Or it may not even be on the pin, maybe it's just bound in the hole at the top. I always thought this condition should lead to broken disconnectors but have not actually seen this.

Personally, I love a trigger OT stop, but I hate screws in guns when they're someplace where they can do harm if they come loose. Even when they're held with LocTite, they are not to be trusted (as far as I'm concerned). What I do with triggers fitted with a screw is adjust it, cross-pin lock it (usually with a 1/16 split or roll pin), then drill out the hex socket so somebody can't come along after the fact and try to adjust it and bugger everything up. Triggers without screws, I fabricate a piece that gets pinned or rivetted to the trigger to form a solid stop that is adjusted by mill or file and that's it.

An easier hobby shop method would be to take the screw out and grind or file some shallow flats on it 180 degrees apart on the stop end. Put it back in, adjust overtravel, then take the trigger out. If the flats are vertical already you're good to go, if not, back the screw out until they are (this would be 1/4 turn max) and stake some trigger shoe material into the flats. While I don't believe in LocTite as a stand-alone locking method, it won't hurt to put some on the screw in addition to this..... before you install the screw of course. "Wicking it in" after assembly is a second-rate method.

Remember that an OT stop on a Series 80 gun might prevent the firing pin block from getting far enough out of the way and cause misfires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Mr. Christiansen...as always, thank you for your insight.
 
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