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Owner of lost/stolen gun may be in deep doo-doo after WA shooting

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Since 2018 we've had a slew of bad gun laws on the books in WA, starting with I-1639 (approved by voters) which among many things makes gun owners liable if their firearms are not secured and they end up in the wrong hands. A Snohomish County man might be the first to be charged under this new law if he can't give a good explanation to the police as to how a Glock he owned somehow got lost or stolen, and weeks later was used in a fatal school shooting.

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If this kind of crap law stands then automobile owners will be liable if a 'joy rider' kills someone with their car. Even farther, a thief breaks into your home and steals a knife and kills with it. You didn't secure that knife block so you're on the hook. This is sheer idiocy (IMHO) to hold previous possessors liable for subsequent uses.
Shakespeare was right. Lawyers first. Then the political class.
 

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Does the WA state define reasonable standards of gun storage?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sounds like it sucks to live in Wa and yeah since it was a school shooting instead of normal street thug crime they will probably ruin the former owners life over it.
But tell me something. If he reported it as lost in time and says he had it in a lock box or similar is he ok or what?
My understanding of the law is, if it was secured in a lock box that was broken into, and the owner reported it to the police within 5 days of discovering it then he's off the hook. But if it was simply in a sock drawer and one of his kids' friends found it and took it he's in trouble.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Does the WA state define reasonable standards of gun storage?
Nope. No specific requirements. It's up to the prosecutor to decide if it was secure enough.
 

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Well, according to the article, the owner reported it October 28 as "lost," and the shooting happened November 8, so the article indicates itself that the owner complied with the law. The authorities would have to prove some type of connection to have a crime, i.e. the suspect says he bought it from the owner, and has proof, or something similar. This article is just stirring the pot, demonizing gun owners, and justifying the stupid law!

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if he can't give a good explanation to the police as to how a Glock he owned somehow got lost or stolen
Define good? If it was stolen, that's pretty much it. Do victims of car theft owe the people for property damage later when the stolen car is wrecked? Of course not.
 

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Since 2018 we've had a slew of bad gun laws on the books in WA, starting with I-1639 (approved by voters) which among many things makes gun owners liable if their firearms are not secured and they end up in the wrong hands. A Snohomish County man might be the first to be charged under this new law if he can't give a good explanation to the police as to how a Glock he owned somehow got lost or stolen, and weeks later was used in a fatal school shooting.

Giving any further explanation to the police will just give them and the DA/County Attorney a story to pick apart. He or she should stand on his or her right to remain silent and consult an attorney if needed.
 

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Nope. No specific requirements. It's up to the prosecutor to decide if it was secure enough.
And of course a locked front door and a pre-existing law against burglary will not suffice. The prosecutor will be out for blood. Particularly since the midterms are over and they now have carte blanche for another two years.
 

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Once Upon A Time...

Up North in MI, a gent kept getting his cottage burgled. He decided to leave only his old war surplus rifle there, but not the ammo for it..

As you'd expect the same morons broke in (again), and this time found the rifle and ammo and swiped it all.

Cops arrested him, and I believe he was sent up for "manslaughter" and "negligence" - because the freakin' thieves stuck the wrong stolen ammo up the wrong stolen rifle and it blew up in their face.

Yup, they blamed the home-owner.

Shizzle like this is why I figure yer further ahead not even trying to be nice.
 

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If this kind of crap law stands then automobile owners will be liable if a 'joy rider' kills someone with their car. Even farther, a thief breaks into your home and steals a knife and kills with it. You didn't secure that knife block so you're on the hook. This is sheer idiocy (IMHO) to hold previous possessors liable for subsequent uses.
Shakespeare was right. Lawyers first. Then the political class.
The thing is that they do not care about any of that. They just want to take your guns away, plain and simple!
 

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From the news story. "...report it to law enforcement within 5 days of learning or should have known the firearm is missing, ..."

Is the "should have known" real?
If so do you have to take inventory every four days??? Only semi-kidding on this.
They put stuff like that in there so that rich people with access to slick lawyers have an out.
 

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Well, according to the article, the owner reported it October 28 as "lost," and the shooting happened November 8, so the article indicates itself that the owner complied with the law. The authorities would have to prove some type of connection to have a crime, i.e. the suspect says he bought it from the owner, and has proof, or something similar. This article is just stirring the pot, demonizing gun owners, and justifying the stupid law!

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Sooner or later, they will get a case egregious enough to where they can establish precedent that "lost" in and of itself is not a legitimate excuse.
 

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Sno Cty prosecutor is already pursuing charges against a Monroe corrections officer who put her pistol in a kitchen drawer, where it was retrieved by her twelve year old son, who committed suicide with the pistol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Once Upon A Time...

Up North in MI, a gent kept getting his cottage burgled. He decided to leave only his old war surplus rifle there, but not the ammo for it..

As you'd expect the same morons broke in (again), and this time found the rifle and ammo and swiped it all.

Cops arrested him, and I believe he was sent up for "manslaughter" and "negligence" - because the freakin' thieves stuck the wrong stolen ammo up the wrong stolen rifle and it blew up in their face.

Yup, they blamed the home-owner.

Shizzle like this is why I figure yer further ahead not even trying to be nice.
Any sort of entrapment is illegal. Booby-trapping your house, arming yourself and waiting for the bad guys to show up, etc will get you into trouble. Store owners have done both of those and ended up in jail over it.
 
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How many prosecutions have there been for the tens of thousands of guns including fully automatic rifles that have gone missing from ATF and othe law enforcement agencies. Including guns that were scheduled to be destroyed and reported as having been destroyed? Or the fast and furious guns that were used to kill a federal officer?
 
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