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A friend came by with his father-in-law 1911 with the shoulder holster (stamped US) asking what it is worth. He is just getting into guns and had this in the back of his closet. Both the gun and holster is in great shape. I field stripped the gun and the pin that holds the lug in came out but it was clean. Is that normal? I would rate the gun around 95%. It even had 7 rounds of ammo in the gun. Looks to be from that era.

Then he pulls out a German Luger (FIL had it dated to 1936) asking about that gun. It has aS/42 on the top slide with 3 marking on the frame.

Anybody help out dating the Colt and maybe how to find out some history on the Luger?
 

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You'll find all the help you need, along with expert advice offered up willingly, and research resources second to none, right here on this site. For your part, all that's required are photos.
 

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You will need a tad better lighting and try to get close ups of all proof marks, stamps and numbers. These are the pesky details that the Wizards in here use to read the 1911 Crystal ball to tell you all there is to know about these possibly fine Pistols.

Take a look at other posts inquiring the same help. You will find good examples of the type of photos that may be needed. Additionally, these sample photos will help you know exactly where to look, for those pesky little hidden prof marks that most of us novices don't even know are there.
 

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Rough to work from these images but the M1911 appears to be an arsenal rebuilt 1919 Colt.

All small parts appear to be early parts, grips are WWII Colt. Parkerized finish would be correct for an arsenal rework. I can't see any marks on the M1911A1 barrel, but I'll betcha it's marked HS. I don't see any arsenal stamps. The grips and barrel have me thinking 1945-1952 rebuild.

Going rate for reworks has been in the $800 - $1,200 range for a while now. Based on what I see, I'd be in the middle of that range at around $1,000.

Better pics showing all markings would help a lot.
 

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http://www.lugerforum.com/

About sixty years ago when I was a teenager I bought a Luger in a drugstore for $20. A few years later a friend offered me $40. Doubled my money. Live & learn.
I remember two things about my Luger:
* The last two digits of the serial number were stamped on many of the small parts.
* It "stovepiped" more often than not, catching spent cartridges upright between chamber and bolt.
At the time I sold it I was glad to be rid of it. Who needs a gun that doesn't work?
Live & learn & regret.
 

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Lugers like to be fed fairly warm ammo loaded to max OAL. Short and/or underpowered ammo is guaranteed to make them choke. The Germans fed theirs the right stuff so malfunctions weren't much of a problem as long as they were kept reasonably clean. These days however finding Luger-friendly 9mm ammo is pretty difficult. If you have a shooter-grade Luger that you take out regularly you probably just roll your own.
 

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A friend came by with his father-in-law 1911 with the shoulder holster (stamped US) asking what it is worth. He is just getting into guns and had this in the back of his closet. Both the gun and holster is in great shape. I field stripped the gun and the pin that holds the lug in came out but it was clean. Is that normal? I would rate the gun around 95%. It even had 7 rounds of ammo in the gun. Looks to be from that era.

Then he pulls out a German Luger (FIL had it dated to 1936) asking about that gun. It has aS/42 on the top slide with 3 marking on the frame.

Anybody help out dating the Colt and maybe how to find out some history on the Luger?
On the Luger aspect, you might want to visit this forum site:
http://luger.gunboards.com/forum.php?
I'm pretty sure there are Luger experts there to give information about your friend's Luger. The site has discussion on Imperial Lugers, Weimar Lugers, Third Reich Lugers, Commercial/Foreign contract Lugers.
 

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The M1911 is as described above. It is not unusual for the barrel link pin to be loose. When the pistol is assembled it's trapped and can't come out. You just have to careful when it's being taken apart. Any gunsmith can quickly peen the lugs on both sides to tighten it up.
On the Luger, there's a tremendous amount to be learned before any assessment can be made. The link already given is the place to go to get started.
 

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The slide on the M1911 predates the frame, but such mismatches are common.
My Luger experience says it's something other than ammo power that affects reliable function.
I have a .30 Luger that perks along on loads of 85grs @ 1150fps, and that's a much lighter load than any factory 9mm.
 
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