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Discussion Starter #1
I have a SA with a parkerized finish that is looking a little worn in a few places. I'm thinking about buying the chemicals and re-parkerizing this gun. Will I need to remove the existing finish before doing so?

I appreciate the help.
 

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http://www.brownells.com/TechCorners/SearchCriteria.asp

Go to that URL then do a search on "parkerize". It should tell you everything you need to know.



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Discussion Starter #4
As of yesterday, I had not received a response to my question, so I started looking at older posts. I ran across one of Ned Christiansen’s posts entitled "Parkerizing over existing blue on Kimber." I sent my question to him directly, and he was most helpful. We exchanged a few e-mails, which I’ve compiled below.


Q: I have a parkerized Springfield that is looking a little worn. I installed a new S&A grip safety, and wanted to file away some of the frame to blend it. I would like to use one of the home parkerizing kits to refinish the pistol when I'm done. Do you know if I will need to have the frame bead blasted before I re-parkerize it, or can I just do it over the existing finish after de-greasing it?

Ned: It would be better if you could blast it all first. You could probably get an 85% good job just re-Parkerizing the bare spots, as long as the frame was really, really well degreased. I'd rinse and brush it with mineral spirits and then get it in some good strong, hot dishwater before putting it in the tank. The dishwater (lye even better) would remove anything left by the mineral spirits.

The Brownells Parko stuff is a little more complicated than the stuff I use.
The name and number for my supplier is Palmetto Armory - 864-246-3836. It's fairly easy to do, not a lot of bad fumes, etc., but you need a tank.... for one job of one frame, I believe you could even get away with a large coffee can. You need a thermometer too.

Q: Would a degreaser work as well as the mineral spirits and lye?

Ned: I think the final degrease should be something not petroleum based: Acetone or denatured alcohol maybe.

Q: I was planning on using a metal pot over my stove (I have been following
PvtRyan’s project and saw that he did this). Is there a problem with this approach? Will it stink up the house?

Ned: A big metal pot would be fine. A little ventilation would be a good idea, but it's not bad at all. A range hood would be more than adequate.


[This message has been edited by Hays (edited 10-25-2001).]
 
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